Jeff Capel Talks About the Iconic Photo of 2Pac Wearing His Duke Jersey

Earlier this week, the University of Pittsburgh hired former Duke basketball star Jeff Capel—who has spent the last two decades coaching at Old Dominion, VCU, Oklahoma, and Duke—to be their new head coach. Capel will take over a team that finished 8-24 overall and 0-18 in the ACC this season.

As news of Capel’s hiring made the rounds on social media, more than a few people did what they always seem to do whenever Capel’s name is in the news. They shared an iconic photo of 2Pac wearing Capel’s Duke jersey back in the 1990s. The legendary rapper was actually spotted wearing Capel’s jersey on a number of occasions back then, but there is one photo, in particular, that gets shared on Twitter whenever Capel does anything newsworthy.

Despite the fact that the photo has become so iconic that a different Capel jersey 2Pac owned was auctioned off and sold for thousands of dollars in 2017, Capel has not really been asked for his thoughts on the photo—until now.

On Wednesday, Capel held his introductory press conference at Pitt, and he talked about all of the things you would expect him to on his first day on the job. He discussed what he plans to do to turn the Panthers around, how he’s going to attack the recruiting circuit, what he learned from serving as an assistant to Coach K at Duke over the last seven years, and more.

But after that was done, he also took the time to speak with Sean Gentille of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about—you guessed it—that infamous 2Pac photo.

Capel said the first time he saw 2Pac wearing his jersey was back in 1996 when the rapper was on MTV with the jersey on. You can see him talking about the East Coast vs. West Coast beef with Simon Rex in the clip below while wearing his Capel jersey.

Capel told the PPG he thought it was “the coolest thing” to see 2Pac wearing his jersey.

But Capel also revealed that there have been a lot of people over the years who have tried to pour cold water on him by saying that 2Pac wasn’t wearing his jersey. Capel said he’s been quick to shut those people down.

“As I got older, I started seeing the pictures that were out there of him,” Capel said. “There are other pictures of him with the jersey on, and I would always tell people [who said], 'Oh, that wasn’t your jersey.' I was like, 'Look, man, ‘Pac died in ’96. That was during the time—there was no other No. 5 during that time.'”

Capel also admitted that he has learned how to use the 2Pac photo to his advantage. While you could argue that today’s teenagers might not idolize 2Pac in the same way as teenagers did a decade ago, Capel said he’s not above pulling the photo out and showing it to recruits. Capel—who is considered to be one of the best recruiters in college basketball—said he once used it as a recruiting tool when chasing after an unnamed player who was friends with one of today’s famous rappers.

“I showed it to one kid. I did show it to one kid. Because he had a picture with a famous rapper and had a relationship [with him],” Capel said. “I was like, 'Hey, I’ve got one, too. This guy wore my jersey.' So I did do that one time, yeah.”

Pretty cool story overall. But unfortunately, no word yet on what Capel thinks about the time Tyga wore his jersey. Think he uses that for recruiting, too?

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The List of Crazy LeBron James Conspiracy Theories Just Keeps Growing

During NBA All-Star Weekend, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver mentioned that the league is considering potentially altering its playoff system. Instead of having the teams divided by conference—with seeds 1 through 8 in the East and seeds 1 through 8 in the West—the change would mean all 16 teams would compete in the same bracket, with East teams competing with West teams. In theory, seed 1 would play seed 16, much like the NCAA Tournament system.

On the surface, this is a reasonable change that could make the NBA Playoffs more interesting. As it stands now, the first round of the playoffs is pretty…lacking. This would shake things up.

But some people have already asked: Could this possibly all be a ploy to benefit LeBron James? That's the perspective Out Of Bounds host Gilbert Arenas espoused on Tuesday's episode of the show. Check out No Chill Gil's take in the video above. You can also catch the full episode below.

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“Why would you want to change it now? Huh, if Adam Silver knows LeBron James is coming to the West Coast,” Gil said. “If LeBron James comes to the West Coast, this actually makes sense now.”

Indeed, where the King will play next season is a topic of much debate among NBA fans. People have said for over a year that they think he's headed to the Lakers, while others have linked him to the Rockets—both Western Conference teams. Either way, Gil's theory suggests the NBA is trying to set the playoff seedings up so that LeBron would still have a relatively easy path to the NBA Finals, even while playing in the West.

Gil's conspiracy theory is far from the only conspiracy theory that has been attached to LeBron's name throughout his illustrious 15-year career. Conspiracy theories following someone nicknamed “LBJ”? You don't say. (Word to Lyndon Baines Johnson, whom conspiracy theorists blame for the Kennedy assassination.)

Below are some of the wildest LeBron James conspiracy theories we've ever seen.

1. LeBron is headed to the Lakers because of…Space Jam 2?!

It feels like Space Jam 2 is never going to happen at this point, right? However, some believe signing with L.A. would give LeBron the buzz needed to raise the budget for the film. Director Justin Lin has confirmed the sequel is happening. We just don't know when.

2. The Spurs air conditioning conspiracy

The Spurs jumped to a 1-0 lead in the 2014 NBA Finals, and LeBron had to leave Game 1 in a pivotal moment because he cramped up in the fourth quarter. People accused San Antonio of intentionally messing with the A.C. to force the best player alive to check out of the game. That would be downright Belichickian.

3. We have to address Delonte West

Did former Cavs guard Delonte West have an affair with LeBron James' mom Gloria in 2010? We may never know, but West appeared to confirm the rumors in 2014.

4. Did a young LeBron intentionally blow a playoff game against Boston?

The Cavs played the Celtics in the 2010 Eastern Conference semifinals, and some accused him of intentionally blowing Game 6. The theory is that LeBron wanted out of Cleveland and he used that series to show the NBA he simply had to leave because he was working with so little talent.

5. Were he and Kyrie in it together?

All the drama that followed LeBron and former teammate Kyrie Irving this summer was so perfect and theatrical that it seemed staged. Was it possible they worked together to orchestrate a move that was ideal for both of their careers? Some think so.

6. Did he play a role in Eric Bledsoe's trade demand?

Eric Bledsoe demanded to be traded and eventually was—from the Phoenix Suns to the Milwaukee Bucks this past fall. Rich Paul, LeBron's agent and close friend, represents Bledsoe. Some believe LeBron was pulling the strings because he wanted Bledsoe to get out of Phoenix.

7. Really, anything could be turned into a LeBron conspiracy—even wine

Even an innocuous team trip to Napa Valley for a nice wine tasting has proven it could lead to conspiracies. People blamed the Cavs' 2017-18 struggles (which are maybe, possibly, probably over) on their love for the vino.


The Eastern Conference looks up for grabs right now. The Cavs are surging, but the Raptors and Celtics have been good all year. Regardless of how the playoffs shake out, you can bet more LBJ conspiracy theories will hit the internet in May and June—especially after he announces his free-agency decision. Get ready to add to this list.

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The comedian insists that racism is a thing of the past.

Hit-Boy and Dom Kennedy Debate If West Coast Rap Gets Enough Credit on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Dom Kennedy and Hit-Boy join DJ Akademiks and Nadeska to talk about if West Coast rap gets enough credit, how artists stay relevant in 2017, and much more.

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A Last-Minute Guide to Watching the Solar Eclipse If You Forgot It Was Coming

By now, you’ve probably heard someone mention the upcoming solar eclipse. While many of us don't pay much attention to the astronomical developments of our time, this one, my friends, is the eclipse of the century. 

If you’re looking for a quick catch-up or a last-minute refresher, here’s everything you need to know.

What in the world is a solar eclipse?

It’s when the moon passes between the sun and earth, thus blocking part or all of the sun for a time.

How rare is this?

We haven’t been able to see one from the States since Feb. 1979. It’s even rarer for one to be visible from coast to coast. The last time that happened was June 1918. So, yeah—it’s a big deal.

How long will it last?

It will take approximately 90 minutes for the eclipse to cross through the country. No one will see the totality of the eclipse for longer than three minutes.

When is this thing going down?

Monday, beginning at approximately 10:15 a.m. on the West Coast, and ending at approximately 2:50 p.m. on the East Coast.

Will it look the same for all states?

Nope. Most states will experience a partial eclipse. Fourteen states will experience a total eclipse, where the entire sun is blocked by the moon for a time. These states are: Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

How do I know what it will look like and what time it will come through my area?

Use this calculator, fam.

Am I definitely going to see it?

Not necessarily. If it’s rainy or cloudy, you could miss out. Sorry.

Anything I should know from a safety perspective?

Some have cautioned drivers to stay off the roads during the eclipse. At the very least, make sure you have your headlights on and, if you are going to be on the roads, follow this advice to be prepared. Don’t look at the sun during the eclipse, even if the moon is partially blocking it, as this can seriously damage your eyes. If you want to watch it, you need to buy some fancy eclipse sunglasses.

Can I watch it online?

Yes you can, my Millennial friend. NASA will have a livestream and even an eclipse pre-show, which begins at noon EST Monday. Follow the stream here.

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Prodigy’s Official Cause of Death Revealed

Prodigy, the legendary hip-hop figure and one half of Mobb Deep, passed away at the age of 42 on June 20. At the time, it was reported that he had died from complications related to his lifelong battle with sickle-cell anemia.

Now we have an official cause of death: accidental choking. Prodigy was indeed hospitalized to receive treatment for sickle-cell anemia, and he died while in the Las Vegas hospital by choking on an egg, as first reported by TMZ.

The Clark County Medical Examiner announced its determination after completing an investigation. The Clark County Coroner’s office confirmed to Complex that “cause of death was choking and the manner was accident.”

Prodigy's sickle-cell had flared up after a performance in the severe West Coast heat of Las Vegas. Prodigy was performing on the Art of Rap Tour with Havoc, Ghostface Killah, KRS-One, Onyx, and Ice-T.

Prodigy and Havoc met in high school in Manhattan and originally chose the name “Poetical Prophets” before shifting to Mobb Deep. Their second album, The Infamous, which dropped in 1995, was their breakthrough.

They released eight studio albums together and are one of the most critically acclaimed groups in hip-hop history.

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The Game: Meek Mill and Safaree Should Fight One-on-One

Should Meek Mill and Safaree Samuels throw down? The Game is all for it.

Following BET’s Celebrity Basketball Game on Saturday, TMZ caught up with The Game to get his thoughts about the beef between Meek and Safaree. Though the West Coast rapper said he wants to stay out of the feud, he fully supported a one-on-one fight between Nicki Minaj’s exes.

“Why not meet up and fight one-on-one? You know what I’m saying? It’s only fair,” he said. The cameraman went on to ask The Game how he thinks the brawl should go down. Should it go down in the streets? Or a proper boxer ring?

“However they want to do it, man. Let’s get it done,” The Game said.

The beef between Meek and Safaree intensified this weekend during DJ Khaled's pre-BET Awards party in West Hollywood. Footage from that night shows Safaree getting jumped in the street as Meek looks on. Shortly after the incident, the Love & Hip Hop star posted his own video, claiming Meek and his crew were behind the attack.

“Saw Meek, he hopped out [of his car], then I just got snuffed,” he says. “Ni**as jumped me […] Meek, you are the biggest pussy on this planet. You saw me, you ain't do shit, you had your ni**as jump me. One-on-one you can't fuck with me, so that's why you had to do that.”

If Safaree does want to take on Meek, he might have to wait in line. Though The Game said he wasn’t getting involved in this situation, it seems he has his own score to settle with the Philadelphia rapper. The two have been trading shots for a while now—both on social media and in records. There was also that time The Game challenged Meek to a fight. Obviously, that match never happened, but, as pointed out by Baller Alert, The Game is still up for it:

 

Ballerific Comment Creepin —- 🌾👀🌾 #thegame #commentcreepin

A post shared by Baller Alert (@balleralert) on Jun 24, 2017 at 10:44am PDT

 

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How Rhude, One of the Best L.A. Brands, Started With a Single T-Shirt

In 2012, Rhuigi Villasenor designed a black/white paisley bandana T-shirt. “It was a nod to West Coast culture,” says the 25-year-old L.A.-based designer. It was the very first thing he created for Rhude, the brand he founded a year later, and the piece that helped catapult the label.

Kendrick [Lamar] wanted the T-shirt,” says Villasenor. “Snoop [Dogg] was like, ‘I need about 100 of those.’”

Villasenor had no intention of selling the T-shirt at first. “I didn’t want anyone else to have my look,” he says. But he eventually gave it to Lamar, who wore black and red versions to the BET Awards. “It was beautiful,” he says. “It changed my life.”

Kendrick Lamar Rhude Bandana tee
Kendrick Lamar wearing Rhude Black Bandana T-shirt. (Image via Getty)

At the encouragement of his friends Chris Stamp and Guillermo Andrade, designers of Stampd and 424, respectively, Villasenor also made the bandana T-shirt available to the public. “Chris was like, ‘If you don’t make the shirt, I will,’” Villasenor says with a laugh. “I was like, ‘Oh shit! I gotta make this.’” Soon, other brands were making knock-offs of his design.

Since then, Rhude has built a solid fanbase. The brand, which has expanded from tees to a full line, is one of the best men’s labels around. It’s been worn by celebrities—Big Sean, ASAP Rocky, Kevin Durant, Jimmy Butler, Offset, Future, Bella Hadid—and sold at dozens of the best retailers, such as Barneys, SSENSE, Patron of the New, 424, and Union.

Big Sean Wearing Rhude Peace Camo Hoodie
Big Sean wearing Rhude Peace Camo hoodie. (Image via Getty)

Born in Manila, Philippines, Villasenor was always interested in clothing but a career in fashion didn’t seem viable. His father, who was an architect, wanted him to work in the medical field. “The arts is something they frown upon in the Filipino culture,” he explains. “So I didn’t think about that at all.”

But during his senior year of high school, he started working with TISA, the clothing label by producer and Kanye West collaborator Taz Arnold, helping in any way he could. (He met Arnold at one of TISA’s parties in L.A.) “I was consulting, I did videos and campaigns,” he says. He wasn’t being paid, but he considered the experience valuable. “At the time, I thought TISA was the first driving force in L.A. ever. Prices were increasing, and kids were purchasing. After [TISA], it was like a domino effect. You couldn’t see kids spend just $20 on a T-shirt anymore.”

Kendrick Lamar Rhude Bandana tee
Image via Getty

From there, he began taking pattern making classes and assisting stylists for guys like Big Sean. At 19, he interned for British menswear designer Shaun Samson. “At the time, [Comme des Garcons designer] Rei Kawakubo had just said he was an influential designer so I was like, ‘Damn. If Rei Kawakubo is calling him that then I gotta pay attention,” he says. “Shaun taught me so much about design.”

Growing up, his family had very little money and he couldn’t afford the clothes he wanted to wear. So, he decided to make his own. “It was hard to get fresh,” he says. “You had to create your own, start boosting, or wear bootleg. I wasn’t about to be the kid that wore bootleg.” In 2013, he launched Rhude.

Rhude Fall/Winter 2017
Rhude's Fall/Winter 2017 “Motorpsycho” Collection. (Image via Rhude)

Rhude borrows from Villasenor’s personal stories and relationships. The moniker itself honors his family’s tradition of names that start with “Rh.” Many of the collections are extensions of his emotions and experiences. The Spring 2016 “Sugarland” collection—ripped jeans, tees with cigarette burns, and logo-heavy jackets—was inspired by a breakup with a girl he spent a lot of time with in Texas. “I envisioned a kid who was trying to break out of a small city but didn’t really know how to find a way out,” he explains. “The kid ends up joining the military, comes back with PTSD, and is lost.” The theme bleeds into Rhude’s Spring/Summer 2017 “Electric Eather” and Fall/Winter 2017 “Motorpsycho” collections. “‘Electric Earth’ would be the recover from that breakup,” says Villasenor. “‘Motorpsycho would be the, ‘I’m done. I’m hanging out.’ It’s like I’m writing volumes.”

Rhude Spring 2016
Rhude's Spring 2016 “Sugarland” Collection. (Image via Rhude)

Rhude is still a relatively small operation, with only a staff of six full-time employees. But Villasenor has big plans for his brand. In a few weeks, he’ll release Rhude’s trendy track pants, which ASAP Rocky has already been seen wearing. Later this year, he’ll expand the brand to include womenswear and footwear, as well as a possible collaboration with Virgil Abloh’s Off-White label. “Virgil and I are figuring that out,” he says. “That Off-White x Rhude.” (The pair recently made tie-dye hoodies for friends and family only.) He hopes to someday open a flagship store in Sugar Land, Texas, but one more similar to the Prada Marfa, a permanently installed sculpture by artists Elmgreen and Dragset also in Texas, than a traditional brick and mortar.

“I’m about to take over the world,” he says.

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Prodigy Beefed With All Your Favorite Rappers, and Always Held His Own

Albert “Prodigy” Johnson, whose death from complications from sickle cell anemia was confirmed Tuesday afternoon, was a true rap legend. As a part of the duo Mobb Deep with Kejuan “Havoc” Muchita, and on his own (especially when partnering with producer Daniel “The Alchemist” Maman), P made classic music that will stand the test of time.

But almost as much as writing great rhymes, Prodigy loved a good rap beef. His career was filled with battles against many of the greatest rappers of all time, and he usually gave as good as he got.

Here is a by-no-means-definitive list of some of P's greatest rap beefs.

Tha Dogg Pound and 2Pac

In his 2011 memoir My Infamous Life, Prodigy traces his beef with nearly the entire West Coast to one video. He says that the clip for Tha Dogg Pound's collaboration with Snoop Dogg, “New York, New York,” which featured the rappers blown up to Godzilla size, walking through NYC wreaking havoc, was something he took personally.

So Mobb Deep teamed up with Capone-N-Noreaga and made “L.A., L.A.” in retaliation. As the East-West rivalry began to heat up, 2Pac, newly signed to Death Row, decided to get involved. 'Pac went at nearly everybody—Big, Nas, Jay Z, and Mobb Deep, plus a few more people for good measure—on “Hit 'Em Up.”

“Don't one of you niggas got sickle cell or something?” Pac teased on the track. “You fuck around with me, you about to have a seizure or a heart attack.”

P struck back immediately. In his book, he says that the very same day he first heard “Hit 'Em Up,” he went to the studio and recorded the vicious “Drop a Gem on 'Em.”

Sadly, just a few weeks later, 'Pac was killed.

Keith Murray and Def Squad

On the now-famous (and oft-parodied) monologue “The Infamous Prelude,” Prodigy took shots at (nameless) rappers who talk about “how much weed you smoke” and “space shit.”

One rapper who did just that, Keith Murray of Def Squad, felt some type of way. Eventually, they squashed the beef at a video shoot. That is, until Prodigy ignited it again by rhyming about “def kids feeling guilty 'bout the space shit” on LL Cool J's “I Shot Ya”—a record on which Murray appeared as well. 

At that point, Murray got into a fight with P outside NYC nightclub the Tunnel (“Keith Murray and his whole clique/Yeah, you snuffed me in front of the cops, that's bullshit,” Prodigy recalled on “In the Long Run”). The two would continue trading disses back and forth for years.

Jay Z

The “New York, New York” video actually started a second major beef in Prodigy's career. Jay made a passing reference to the clip on his 1998 song “Money, Cash, Hoes”: “It's like New York's been soft ever since Snoop came through and crushed the building.”

It was a line Prodigy took public exception to. “Jay was nowhere to be found when that drama popped off between Mobb Deep, Dogg Pound, Pac, and Biggie,” P told The Source. “That was our little personal beef, not a coastal war… so Jay Z is a bitch-ass nigga for making that quote in his lyrics.”

Tensions that had been stewing for years (there were, P claimed, subliminals thrown back and forth on “Trife Life” and “Where I'm From”) exploded in 2001 when Hov debuted his Mobb Deep diss “Takeover” live at Summer Jam, and included the now-infamous picture of a young Prodigy at his grandmother's dance school. 

“I did like the tactic that Jay used,” Prodigy said years later, about the photo displayed on the Summer Jam screen. “That was pretty slick.” He fired back with “Crawlin'”—and, at least according to his memoir, by nearly beating Jay up at Diddy's restaurant, Justin's

Nas

On “Destroy and Rebuild,” released in 2001, Nas took some shots at P, but in a very Nas-like way: “Prodigy, I got love for you,” he says on the song's outro. “Just get them unloyal niggas from out your circle.” Prodigy claimed in his book that Nas rapped this because “he was mad at me for doing a song with Cormega on which Mega took shots at Nas in his verse.”

But there was actually another, deeper level. P said in an interview on Vlad TV that some of Nas' Queensbridge friends were upset that Prodigy was repping their hood even though he wasn't originally from there. 

“I can't even really be mad at Nas, because these is the people he grew up with,” P said. “I had to distance myself from them, because [Nas is] standing next to someone who's threatening my life… that's how it got kind of crazy.” Nas and P reconciled when Prodigy returned home from prison in 2011.

Saigon and Tru Life

To hear Saigon tell it, the origin of this beef comes from Prodigy double-dipping. 

“Prodigy stole $15,000 from Tru Life. Not stole it, but he did a verse for him, and went and did the same verse and took the money, and then went and did the same verse on some other shit,” Sai told This Is 50. “Tru was like, 'Aight, give me another verse.' Son kept ducking.”

Tru Life and Mobb had serious issues from then on, which were documented in the film Beef. Tru claims he and his crew ran into a Mobb studio session with guns and beat some people up.

Because Tru Life and Saigon were close, Sai got dragged in as things escalated. Not helping matters was an interview where P said he didn't like Saigon—something Saigon saw and promised retaliation. It all culminated in a fight between Mobb Deep and Sai at SOBs in the fall of 2007. The two would continue to snipe at each other well into 2011.

As for Tru, he and Prodigy would finally reconcile in 2016.

Crooked I

While incarcerated, P was still keeping up to date on what was going on in hip-hop. Vibe conducted a poll about the best rapper alive in 2008, and Prodigy was not happy with the results. “Vibe says 920,000 people voted for it,” he wrote in a letter. “I would personally bitch slap all 920,000 of these voters if given the opportunity. Who in the fuck picked Crooked I, Flo Rida, and Rich Boy? How did Vibe approve this?”

Crooked responded by challenging Prodigy to a fight.

Havoc

P's propensity for feuds even extended to his own Mobb Deep collaborator, Havoc. In the spring of 2012, Havoc sent out a bunch of strange tweets attacking his partner in rhyme. He went as far as accusing P of having a homosexual relationship while locked up. “”I got n***as in the jail system to back up that prodigy was fucking homes in jail,” he wrote. 

Havoc then released a statement saying his phone was stolen. But that was proven to be a lie when audio of Havoc going at P was leaked to the Breakfast Club. The group went on temporary hiatus, but reunited the following year.

But today, to mark his passing, it's been all love from the rap world. Prodigy is a legend and he will be missed. 

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Prodigy of Mobb Deep Dead at 42

Prodigy, one half of the iconic rap duo Mobb Deep, has passed away at age 42.

The rapper's publicist released a statement on his death, citing complications stemming from his lifelong battle with sickle cell anemia.

It is with extreme sadness and disbelief that we confirm the death of our dear friend Albert Johnson, better known to millions of fans as Prodigy of legendary NY rap duo Mobb Deep. Prodigy was hospitalized a few days ago in Vegas after a Mobb Deep performance for complications caused by a sickle cell anemia crisis. As most of his fans know, Prodigy battled the disease since birth. The exact causes of death have yet to be determined. We would like to thank everyone for respecting the family's privacy at this time.

Several prominent members of the Queens hip-hop community took to social media to share the news—and their condolences—on Tuesday afternoon, with Nas and his younger brother Jungle sharing posts on Instagram within minutes of one another.

 

🙏🏾 QB RIP King P

A post shared by Nasir Jones (@nas) on Jun 20, 2017 at 10:33am PDT

 

#RIP

A post shared by Jungleqb (@jungleqb) on Jun 20, 2017 at 10:42am PDT

Best known by the average fan as one half of the group responsible for the classic rap record, “Shook Ones Pt. II,” Prodigy was part of countless New York posse cuts and a key figure in the “golden age” of rap in the mid-90s. Thanks to the strength of beloved albums like The Infamous and Hell on Earth, Mobb Deep was at the forefront of New York hip-hop during its most prominent era, standing alongside giants like Nas, the Notorious B.I.G., Wu Tang Clan, and others. 

As part of the city's vanguard, Prodigy was a key figure in the East Coast vs. West Coast battle that overtook hip-hop for the better part of a decade. Along with his partner Havoc, he joined Capone-N-Noreaga and Tragedy Khadafi in the West Coast diss track, “L.A. L.A.,” released just shortly before 2Pac was released from prison. Prodigy's battle with sickle cell anemia later became public knowledge after it was brought up by 2Pac multiple times during their war of words, most notably on “Hit 'Em Up.”

The rapper was forced into a brief hiatus from music due to a stint in prison relating to a gun-possession charge. He would go on to release an autobiography, My Infamous Life: The Autobiography of Mobb Deep's Prodigy, before immersing himself in hip-hop once again. More recently, he was responsible for writing a prison cookbook titled Commissary Kitchenin which he shared his path to staying healthy while being behind bars. The book has since been banned in all prisons within the state of California. 

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