Everything We Know About Travis Scott’s ‘Astroworld’

It certainly doesn't feel like 15 months since Travis Scott dropped Birds in the Trap Sing McKnight. The album still sounds as fresh as it did on release day, and Scott has continued to push his music forward at a furious pace.

He's stayed in our playlists with new music—”Butterfly Effect” and “4 AM” alone would mark a successful year for most artists—and been touring relentlessly, often atop his giant birdBut the Houston rapper has also continued to make headlines for the music yet to come. There's a collab album with Quavo that was shipped off for mixing last week (if Quavo is to be believed), and then, there's Astroworld.

The album has become something of a folk tale for the Houston rapper's fans. It's a project closely tied to his city: the name is derived from a local amusement park that closed in 2005, and that closure still stings. “They tore down AstroWorld to build more apartment space,” Scott told GQ in May. “That’s what it’s going to sound like, like taking an amusement park away from kids. We want it back.”  

He's been talking about Astroworld since before BITTSM even dropped, describing one of the best albums of 2016 as a “stepping stone” to Astroworld. So needless to say, we need it. But all Scott gives us these days is one word: “soon.”

Watch the timeline above to hear everything we know about Astroworld​ so far, and check out our new music recommendations for Travis Scott fans below. 

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Migos, Cardi B, and Nicki Minaj’s “MotorSport” Is Here

After months of relentless teasing, the first single from Migos' Culture II has finally landed. “MotorSport” premiered Friday morning on the Breakfast Club shortly after the hosts endured a peculiar conversation with the Hillsong Church guy, just hours after a preview of the track landed on YouTube. 

Migos also teased the new track during their performance at Power 105.1's Powerhouse at Barclays Thursday night.

 

A post shared by Power 105.1 (@power1051) on Oct 26, 2017 at 8:17pm PDT

Check the full version of the soon-to-be-everywhere collaboration, featuring Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, below via Spotify. Murda Beatz and CuBeatz provide production.

Though we still don't have a formal Culture II release date, the arrival of “MotorSport” means we should likely expect the project soon. Judging by Quavo's recent headline-spawning social media activity, the collection may include a variety of additional top-shelf collaborators.

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Donald Glover, Lil Yachty, Drake, Chance the Rapper, Ty Dolla Sign, Big Sean, Travis Scott, and Kanye West have all been either been seen in the studio with Quavo or heard in frustratingly brief clips of already completed collabs. Culture II also boasts a mystery executive producer, with many album hype theorists predicting their identity as being synonymous with 🐐.

 

A post shared by QuavoHuncho (@quavohuncho) on Oct 24, 2017 at 6:09pm PDT

Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, thankfully, also have new projects on the way. For Cardi B, the release will mark her debut studio album and arrives on the wave of hype cultivated by one of the best (and biggest songs) of 2017. 

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Travis Scott’s New Collection With Ksubi Is Finally Here

Australian label Ksubi has released its highly-anticipated collaboration with Travis Scott. The limited 10-piece capsule collection includes tees, jeans, a hooded sweater, a bomber, and an oversized denim jacket.

All of the pieces were designed with Scott's creative direction. The Ksubi and Travis Scott collaboration also features flash-activated paint on the back of the bomber and denim jackets that light up when hit by the flash of a camera. 

The collection is now available in stores and will be up for purchase on the label's website at 12 p.m. ET on Oct. 13. Head to KSUBI.com to cop online or you can visit Barneys, Browns, Farfetch, General Pants Co, Kith, Ksubi, Ron Herman, Ssense, Superette, The Local by General Pants Co., and the Webster to cop in person. 

The collection is expected to sell quickly so if you're planning to buy some pieces make sure you do it quick. Prices range from $120 – $450 USD. 

You can check out the collection below, and get a more in-depth look in the video up top.

Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi
Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi
Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi
Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi
Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi
Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi
Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi
Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi
Travis Scott Ksubi Collab
Image via Ksubi

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Mack Wilds Talks Rappers Stealing Flows on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Mack Wilds joins DJ Akademiks and Nadeska to talk about the balance between rap and R&B in 2017, rappers stealing flows, some O.J. Simpson predictions, and much more. 

 

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Jared Leto Says He “Liked the Challenge” of Going Blind for ‘Blade Runner 2049’

The method actor gives an update on the Joker and talks Travis Scott.

Smokepurpp on Young Thug, Lil Pump, and Dogs

As we learn more about the group of artists first classified as “SoundCloud rappers,” the title feels increasingly inadequate. Smokepurpp is the latest South Florida phenom to break big, recently signing with Alamo Records and landing features from Chief Keef, Travis Scott, and D.R.A.M. for his Deadstar release.

Now that he's fully in the public eye, we wanted to see what Smokepurpp was thinking about during his rise—so we took a trip in Twitter's time machine and asked the Miami rapper what was going through his head when he forgot what a chicken was.  

Watch the latest episode of Trending Topics above, and listen to Deadstar below. 

Catch Smokepurpp live on the Pigeons & Planes stage at ComplexCon, which goes down November 4 and 5 in Long Beach, California. Tickets are on sale​ ​now.​

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Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks Discuss J. Cole’s NFL Boycott on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska celebrate the show's 100th episode while diving into some news, like J. Cole calling for an NFL boycott because of Donald Trump, Kylie Jenner and Travis Scott's rumored pregnancy, and much more. The group also jump into a number of new music releases, including Rapsody, Kevin Gates, and Young Thug

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Quavo Releases New Track “Stars in the Ceiling”

It’s been a good year for Quavo.

In the months following the release of Migos’ sophomore album Culture, the 26-year-old rapper has had a lot of success in his solo endeavors, appearing on cuts by DJ Khaled, Drake, ASAP Mob, Camila Cabello, Post Malone, and many more.

On Tuesday, Quavo blessed fans with another solo track called “Stars in the Ceiling,” produced by frequent collaborator Zaytoven. You can check it out below.

It’s unclear if the song is a stand-alone release or if it's a part of a full-length project. You may have heard that Migos’ label Quality Control is gearing up to release a compilation album, Control the Streets, Vol. 1, which could include “Stars in the Ceiling.” 

Migos is also expected to release Culture 2 sometime next month. And let's not forget about Quavo's highly anticipated joint project with Travis Scott

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Public School on Working on the Air Jordan XV: “It’s a Love It or Hate It Shoe”

Public School is the definitive product of two New York City natives and their go-getter spirits. In less than 10 years since its 2008 inception, founders Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne —who met while working at Sean John— catapulted their own menswear brand to immense popularity with a high-fashion-meets-streetwear approach to design, racking up multiple awards in the process.

While the style and wearability of the apparel made a name for itself, Public School truly claimed its stake as leaders in the fashion industry when it teamed up with Jordan Brand. After working on exclusive friends-and-family versions of the Air Jordan 1, Air Jordan X, and Carmelo Anthony's M10, the NYC-based brand expanded its horizon and launched the PSNY x Air Jordan XII to the public — a dark-grey luxe rendition that resonated with the purest of sneakerheads and menswear enthusiasts alike. The collab was the precursor to three more Air Jordan XIIs that embodied the brand’s hometown of New York City, as well as Paris and Milan.

After a small world tour with the XIIs, the Public School duo is back home for New York Fashion Week to debut their Spring/Summer 2018 collection and a brand new capsule in collaboration with Jordan Brand. Using the black sheep of the Air Jordan lineage, the XV, Public School re-imagined Tinker Hatfield’s original design in ways never seen before. The collection includes Air Jordan XVs for men in black suede, an olive woven material, and for the first time ever, an Air Jordan XV boot for women.

PSNY x Air Jordan XV
Image via Nike

The successful runway show located in the heart of Chinatown was followed up with a nearby pop-up shop, where the footwear and apparel was available for purchase. There, Complex caught up with the PSNY founders, joined fellow Sean John alumnus and current Senior Director of Energy Projects at Jordan Brand Gemo Wong, to talk about the latest drop.

Check out out the latest episode of #LifeAtComplex for a closer look at the star-studded event, inside the pop-up shop, and interview.

How did Public School’s relationship with Jordan Brand first come about?
Gemo Wong: So I’ve known Dao-Yi for a while, we used to work together. As his brand Public School kind of progressed, it felt like the timing was right to do something especially in the apparel space. The partnership started with apparel first and then we kind of explored footwear

After doing your first footwear collaboration, did you know it would become an ongoing partnership?
GW: We just kind of did what we felt was right. It’s all about time, who we [Jordan] are as a brand and who they are as a brand.

What was the motivation behind using the Air Jordan XV for this collab?
Dao-Yi Chao: It’s starts with a conversation. The great thing about working with Gemo and his team is that, there isn’t a set schedule, there isn’t a set plan. We only work when we feel it’s right. When we a great idea, we take it to him and if he likes the idea, he’ll set things into motion. With the XVs specifically, Gemo’s always challenged us to work on shoes that sort of lie outside of the 1s, IIIs, IVs, Vs, VIs, XIs — the really popular ones that iterated a l lot and so we enjoy that challenge. Coming off working on the XII, changing that iconic shoe into something that was definitively Public School, was something that we wanted to carry over on the XVs. It’s a love it or hate it shoe.

Yeah, even Tinker Hatfield, who designed it, has said that it’s his least favorite Air Jordan.
DC: Did he say that?

GW: He’s said that on paper, yeah.

He’s said that on record. Were there any challenges you faced while designing these Air Jordan XVs?
Maxwell Osborne: Not really. Maybe on the women’s side, trying to make the boot.

DC: That was another idea that was born just out of conversation. Like, “Yo, we wanna do it during Fashion Week during the show, but it’s a women’s show. It would be crazy if we turned the XV into a boot!”

It already is kind of chunky like a boot.
DC: Exactly. We wanted to accentuate the obvious things about the shoes. The fold back on the tongue I guess is what you would call it — all of those things we wanted to really build on top of, but make it feel like our own shoe. That’s the point of any good collaboration. You gotta add something to it. It’s already great in its own realm, but how do you add to it and make it something better?

PSNY x Air Jordan 15 Knee-High Boot
the Public School x Air Jordan XV boot for women. Images via Antonio de Moraes Barros for Getty Images

The tongue of the sneakers feature a “WNL” logo. What does the “We Need Leaders” motto specifically mean to Public School as a brand?
MO: “We Need Leaders” for us, was really a call to action. It was for everybody to step up. Us, our team, everybody around the world, just to step up and be better. It also mean when no one’s looking. So, are you the same type of person when the lights turn off and you go home? Are you the same type of person you show face to when you step out of that? WNL mean a lot to us in terms of special leadership and people stepping up to the plate.

When you first released the first grey PSNY XIIs did you expect such a big reaction?
DC: I don’t know, I didn’t know what to expect.

GW: You always have your fingers crossed. You always go in wishing the best. We took a different approach to it, so we were hoping for a good response, especially in [Public School’s] space, the fashion space, it was good overall.

Did the response play a part in following up with the city series or was it already in the works?
GW: Again it all comes down to what we felt was right timing wise, what these guys are into, and making sure the brands are in tune, so as a evolution as the grey we felt like doing the City pack was a good addition.

DC: We say that thing and always felt it was almost boot-like, the way we molded it out, so we just sampled it in a wheat colorway because it felt like a boot. So from there, again, just from the conversation, they put it into work. We it came back we were like, “What if we flip three colors — the Wheat is so New York— what if we created a colorway for Paris and a colorway for Milan?” That’s how it goes, then we try it out. If it don’t feel right then we keep it moving, but if we’re onto something, I think it all clicks with us and we push it forward.

When that release happened launching the collection over multiple cities, it really changed the way retail works. Do you guys plan to do that again, say with this release?
GW: It all depends on the project, the time, how we feel when we all get together.

PSNY x Air Jordan 15 Olive Suede
A sample version of the Public School x Air Jordan XV collaboration, worn by Jordan Brand designer Frank Cooke. Image via Frank Cooker

Gemo, can you explain your role as head of Energy Projects at Jordan Brand?
GW: I’m Senior Director of Energy Projects. That’s everything from what you see here — footwear, apparel, to anything limited and sought after within the brand.

How do you decide on which people to work with like KAWS, Drake, or Travis Scott?
GW: It just all depends on where the brand is at. I don’t want to feel like we have to do collabs. I feel like we should let collabs enhance the brand, rather than we need them for the brand. It takes the pressure off. There is no, “Oh man, I gotta do a collab this month, next month.” As with this project, it’s just timing, where we are as a brand and if it feels right, then we do it.

Why is it important for Jordan Brand to focus on fashion and lifestyle versus just sports?
GW: We concentrate a lot on sports as well. It just so happens that we do some fashion stuff. You look at our portfolio, we still do a lot in the basketball space with athletes like Russ and all their signature shoes, but we also do stuff in the fashion space. Our brand means a lot to everyone, which could be a gift and a curse. As result, we just try to balance it out.

What was it like working with Diddy back during your time at Sean John?
MO: All three of us met at Sean John actually. How did it feel? It felt great! [Laughs] You got Puff’s son behind you.

DC: That brand, that moment in time sort of represented this idea of aspiration. Everything about Puff, even outside of fashion was you should aspire for something better. I think that really stuck with us. That idea of aspiration, doing something unexpected, but always presenting this idea of aspiration to do something better or to make something better. We all went different routes, but that definitely stuck with us.

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People Are Signing a Petition for Quavo to Be Featured on the National Anthem

“The Star-Spangled Banner,” for whatever reason, is the national anthem of the Divided States of America. No offense to anyone into American flag t-shirts and Toby Keith and whatnot, but the song is seriously one of the most boring compositions in music history. In fact, I like to sneak in a quick mini-nap whenever someone insists upon covering it in public.

At least one bold individual, a Kentucky man by the name of Sean Gray, has decided to lead the fight for an improved national anthem by starting a completely reasonable petition. “It's the current year, 2017, and I think the nation should get with the times and feature Quavo on the National Anthem,” Gray writes on his Change.org petition. “He's a feature on everything else, so why not?”

Signees have provided a multitude of reasons for supporting the petition, ranging from “nut” to “Alex told me to” to “Fuck Donald Trump.” Valid causes, all. At the time of this writing, the petition was less than 500 signatures away from its goal of 1,500 supporters after gaining traction with features in a variety of publications, including HotNewHipHop.

In a perfect world, which is quite clearly not the world we're living in now, this petition would immediately be sent to a Trumpless White House and/or whoever's in charge of updating the nation's anthem. After no debate whatsoever, a new national anthem would be commissioned featuring Quavo, Travis Scott, Selena Gomez, and SZA over a track of John Mayer doing some of his finest John Mayering with Travis Barker on drums. Production, ideally, would be handled by Metro Boomin and Mike Will Made-It.

Make it happen, America.

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