Drake-Kendrick Perkins Beef; Steph Curry Cooks in Return; Raptors Already Done? | Out of Bounds

On today’s episode of #OutofBounds, Gilbert Arenas and the crew discuss the Cavs’ Game 1 overtime win in Toronto and ask if the disappointing Raptors are already done. In another L for the Six, Drake got into two hilarious altercations with Cavs reserve center Kendrick Perkins, who would undoubtedly end him in a fight. Was Drizzy out of line, and does his heckling hurt the Raptors? 

Despite Klay Thompson shooting a miserable 4-for-20, the Warriors beat the Pelicans thanks, in part, to Steph Curry returning from a knee injury and scoring 28 points off the bench. With his stars all back, what does Golden State head coach Steve Kerr need to do moving forward in the series?

Looking ahead to tonight’s Game 2 between Houston and Utah, OOB breaks down the only possible way that the Jazz can stop James Harden and the Rockets’ potent offense. Actually, there are two methods, but one is illegal.

A recent ESPN article pointed to Kawhi Leonard’s new reps — one of whom is his uncle — and the Spurs’ control issues as the source of the beef between the franchise and its star. In “The Pull-Up,” Gil and the guys ask if the Spurs should still offer Kawhi the $219 million supermax this summer. Also, Gil explains how mixing business and family typically goes wrong.

In “Fair or Foul?” the team weighs in on Jaguars owner Shahid Khan’s plan to buy Wembley Stadium and host the Super Bowl in London. Is it a good idea? Also, in discussing the idea of an NFL team in London, Gil explains how a star player’s life would change overseas.

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Guest Matt Barnes Pulls No Punches; Blake Ex Drama; Should Refs Get Ejected? | Out of Bounds

On today’s show, NBA bad boy Matt Barnes joins Gilbert Arenas and the #OutofBounds crew to discuss on- and off-court hoops action. Getting things started, Matt tells the back story of his infamous fake pass at Kobe’s face, which revealed Black Mamba to be as cold-blooded as they come. Next, the guys give their two cents on a lawsuit that Blake Griffin’s former fiancee filed on Valentine’s Day, dragging the five-time All-Star, who’s now dating model Kendall Jenner. The suit claims he’s a deadbeat dad who prioritizes Hollywood celebrity over family. Matt, who played with Blake, shares some observations and words of wisdom about bitter exes. In less ugly V-Day news, Giannis Antetokounmpo put his girlfriend on blast, showing off the sex toy she got him on IG live. The gang decides whether that was fair or foul, and Gil explains how he would make use of the thoughtful gift. Following the ejection of Isaiah Thomas and Rajon Rondo last night, for a skirmish reportedly fueled by shade Rondo threw at IT, the team says the real problem is the refs, and offers a suggestion for how the NBA should deal with bad, whistle-happy officials. Gil and Matt then put to rest the debate over whether or not Warriors coach Steve Kerr disrespected the Suns Monday by letting his players call their own plays. And finally, in “The Pull-Up,” the NBA vets advise the league on how it can fix the All-Star Game and the weekend generally. If the Association doesn’t finish with these great assists, it needs to be sent to the G League.

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Does Steve Kerr Have a Trash-Talking Burner Twitter, Kevin Durant Style?

Back in September, Kevin Durant got exposed for using secret “burner” social media accounts to defend himself in online arguments. He later admitted he felt “idiotic” for using them, and it was widely considered to be one of the biggest social media fails in the sports world in 2017.

With that in mind, you wouldn’t think KD’s own head coach would resort to using a burner Twitter to comment on opposing players, but that’s what some people are accusing Steve Kerr of doing. He tweeted and deleted a shot at James Harden and some NBA referees on Thursday night, and while he may have simply thought better of the tweet after sending it, many are now wondering if Kerr didn’t mean to send the tweet from a different account in the first place.

It all started when the official NBA Twitter account tweeted about Harden just after 10 p.m. ET on Thursday. It featured Harden taking and making a step-back three-pointer against the Spurs during the Rockets’ 102-91 victory over San Antonio.

A short time later, Kerr saw the NBA tweet and had something to say about it. On his official account he suggested Harden traveled on the play. He said it was “an embarrassment” Harden wasn’t whistled for a walk.

The tweet didn’t stay up long. But plenty of people were able to get a screenshot before it disappeared, and they wondered why in the world Kerr would take aim at Harden and the refs like that. Some concluded Kerr simply got caught up in the moment before deciding against leaving the tweet up. But more than a few people suggested Kerr may have meant to send it from a burner account, just like KD.

Kerr hasn’t spoken publicly about any of this yet. But it’ll be interesting to see what he has to say. If he meant to send the Harden tweet from his account, most of the Rockets players are probably going to have the same reaction Chris Paul had to something Kerr said to him during a recent game.

And if Kerr meant to send out the tweet from some secret account he uses, he's likely to get clowned the same way KD did. Either way, we wouldn’t expect Harden and the Rockets to forget about what Kerr said anytime soon.

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Steph Curry, Kevin Durant, and Warriors React to Suffering Worst Loss of Season Against Jazz

The Warriors once again look like the favorites to win the NBA Finals this season. At 40-11, they are heads and tails above every other team in the league. But throughout the course of the season, they have shown that they can be beaten—and even blown out—when they don’t put forth their best effort.

Back in late October, the Warriors sustained a 111-101 loss to the Grizzlies in Memphis, just days after knocking off the Rockets in their season-opening game. In late November, Golden State got trounced by the Thunder 108-91 in Oklahoma City. And earlier this month, the Warriors got their rear ends kicked at home by the Clippers 125-106 in a game that featured Lou Williams going off for 50 points. It doesn’t happen often, but those teams have shown that, if you catch the Warriors on an off night, you can give them a taste of their own medicine.

On Tuesday night, the Jazz were the latest team to unexpectedly beat up on the Warriors. Ricky Rubio notched a double-double with 23 points and 11 assists and Joe Ingles knocked down a career-high six three-pointers on his way to 20 points as Utah jumped all over Golden State at home en route to a 129-99 win. The 30-point loss was the Warriors’ worst loss of the season so far.

After the game, several Warriors players tried to explain what happened. Kevin Durant, who scored 17 points during the contest, put a lot of the blame on himself. He admitted to not doing a very good job on the defensive side of the ball while guarding Ingles.

“I can’t let Joe Ingles get loose on 3s like that and expect us to play well on the road, especially in here,” KD said. “I got to start off the game better if we want to win games.”

Steph Curry, who scored just 14 points on 1-for-7 shooting from behind the three-point line, wasn’t happy with the way his team played as a whole. He revealed that, during the fourth quarter, he told Draymond Green it was one of the worst games he’s ever seen the current Warriors team play.

“I asked Draymond on the bench in the fourth quarter if he could remember that bad of a performance that we’ve had in recent memory,” Curry said, “and we really can’t. You can’t just show up, especially on the road, and expect to win. That’s kind of cheating the game.”

Green, meanwhile, was slightly less concerned than his teammates were about the Warriors’ putrid performance. He said he actually thought the Warriors were going to pull off a massive comeback at some point. And even though they weren’t ultimately able to do it, he didn’t sound too worried about what the loss would mean for his team in the long run.

“I'm just foolish enough to believe that we always have a chance,” Green said. “So even going into that fourth quarter, I'm like, 'OK, here we go. All right, here comes a run. They're playing great, but they can't really get over 16, 18. We can cover that really quick. Here we go.' It just ain't never happen for us. So it's cool.”

But Warriors head coach Steve Kerr wasn’t as forgiving as Green was. He attempted to light a fire under the Warriors by blasting them for their “pathetic effort.” He also referred to the “disgusting basketball” he saw them play while speaking with reporters after the game.

“We just didn’t start out the game with any force defensively,” Kerr said. “We weren’t staying into bodies, they were just stopping behind screens, we were lazy on our switches. We played with no sense of urgency, no sense of purpose.”

The good news for the Warriors is that they should have a good chance to bounce back from their loss to the Jazz during their next game on Friday night. They will travel to Sacramento to play the Kings, and seeing as how the Warriors already suffered a surprising loss to the Kings during a home game back in late November, they should have absolutely no trouble getting up for the game and getting back on track.

The Warriors will follow their game against the Kings with another road game against the Nuggets on Saturday night before returning home next Tuesday night for a nationally-televised matchup against the Thunder.

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Steve Kerr Goes Off on LaVar Ball and Calls Him ‘the Kardashian of the NBA’

Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr has had about enough of LaVar Ball. Prior to the Warriors' game against the Denver Nuggets on Monday, Kerr went on a rant, blasting the media, specifically ESPN, for their coverage of LaVar and the entire Ball family. “Somewhere, I guess in Lithuania, LaVar Ball is laughing,” he said. “People are eating out of his hands for no apparent reason, other than that he's become the Kardashian of the NBA or something. That sells, and that's what is true in politics, entertainment and now in sports. It doesn't matter if there's any substance involved in an issue.” 

Kerr's problem with the Worldwide Leader in Sports in all of this is that, not too long, ESPN laid off a number of journalists who covered the NBA and provided substance by writing about the X's and O's of the game of basketball. However, all of that has gone out of the window, in favor of what Kerr refers to as “sensationalized news.” 

“You can see they’re not playing for Luke no more,” Ball said of Los Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton. “Luke doesn’t have control of the team no more. They don’t want to play for him.” LaVar's remarks must have struck a chord with Kerr since Walton served as an assistant coach under him for the Warriors from 2014 to 2016. 

It's the second time in as many days where an NBA head coach has criticized ESPN for giving LaVar a platform. On Sunday, Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle called the article where LaVar ripped Walton a “disgrace,” adding that ESPNshould back up the coaches.” 

Watch Kerr's rant regarding Ball, ESPN, and the media below. 

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You Buying This Explanation for Why Colin Kaepernick Wasn’t on That Controversial SI Cover?

Earlier this week, Sports Illustrated released one of the most controversial covers they’ve put out in a long time, even though they probably didn’t necessarily think that it would be all that controversial when they were planning it. As a reaction to all of the protests that took place last weekend after Donald Trump came out and criticized NFL players for taking a knee during the national anthem prior to games, SI put together a cover with the title, “A NATION DIVIDED, SPORTS UNITED.” It featured LeBron James, Steph Curry, Roger Goodell, Steve Kerr, Michael Bennett, and Candace Parker on it, among others.

As soon as the SI cover started circulating on social media, the first question most people had was: “WTF is Roger Goodell doing on it?” While Goodell did release a statement and—sort of—distance himself and the NFL from Trump’s anti-protest comments, he hasn’t exactly gone out of his way to support the players who have protested racial injustices and police brutality over the last year. And lest you forget, he’s kept quiet with regards to the petition that a handful of players sent him over the summer asking for the NFL to devote an entire month to social activism. So his inclusion on the SI cover was puzzling at best and downright disrespectful at worst in the eyes of many.

It also didn’t take very long for people to start asking another question once they got a glance at the cover: “Where is Colin Kaepernick?” Kaepernick is obviously the reason that this SI cover even exists in the first place. If he doesn’t take a knee during the national anthem before a preseason game last season, and if he doesn’t continue to take a knee during the national anthem before every regular-season game last year, and if he doesn’t influence other players to start taking a knee during the national anthem before games, and if he doesn’t get blackballed by the NFL in the offseason for igniting the entire #TakeAKnee movement, there is no reason for SI to do a “NATION DIVIDED, SPORTS UNITED” cover. So—where is Colin Kaepernick?

A lot of people asked this question:

Hell, even Curry, who was featured front and center on the SI cover, thought it was completely idiotic for SI to run a cover like this without giving a nod to the guy who is responsible for it existing. He went off on the cover on Wednesday and accused SI of trying to capitalize on the moment rather than actually doing something impactful for the culture.

“That was terrible,” he said. “Just kind of capitalizing on the hoopla and the media and all that nonsense. The real people that understand exactly what’s been going on and who’s really been active and vocal and truly making a difference, if you don’t have Kaepernick front and center on that, something’s wrong. It’s kind of hard to see how certain narratives take place, being prisoners of the moment.”

On Thursday, SI attempted to cover its ass by having Executive Editor Steve Cannella put together a video to explain the magazine’s original intention when they first conceived the cover. And it’s a great video—if you’re a fan of hearing someone use a bunch of buzz words that sound important. You can hear all about the “enduring message” of unity that SI was trying to get across with their cover below or here.

But what about the omission of Kaepernick? Again: Where was he? Cannella touched on that, too, and in doing so, he tried to sell everyone on the idea that Kaepernick was on the cover, even if he wasn’t actually there in the physical form.

“In some ways, even though his picture is not there, Colin Kaepernick is there; I think we all know that,” he said. “Colin Kaepernick—for lack of a better word—was looming over everything that happened this past weekend, and looms over many of the issues in society right now.”

Cannella continued by saying that SI’s intention wasn’t to ignore Kaepernick (for the record, he was mentioned at length in the accompanying cover story). Rather, the magazine wanted to shine light on some of the other professional athletes who stepped up in his absence last weekend—since, again, he has essentially been blackballed by the NFL—and continued to carry out his message.

“I thought what we were trying to capture with this cover was the way new voices emerged this weekend,” he said.

And later, he once again tried to push the idea that Kaepernick was a part of the cover even though, well, he wasn’t.

Colin Kaepernick is on that cover,” Cannella said. “Even if his face and his name aren’t there, we all know who stands behind this movement. We all know who got it started. Colin Kaepernick has many more brothers than he did a week ago.”

The problem with all of this is that by not including Kaepernick on the cover, SI—and those who are in favor of the message SI presented with its cover—are taking the focus away from what Kaepernick was protesting last season and instead turning it into a completely different issue. The “united” approach that SI took when it put its cover together is now leading to protests that really aren’t protests at all.

Kaepernick made it very clear why he was protesting shortly after his first protest went public.

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses Black people and people of color,” he said. “To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder…I have to stand up for people that are oppressed.”

So by pushing Kaepernick out of the spotlight—or in this case, off of the SI cover—you’re also pushing the message that he fought so hard to get out there last season out of the spotlight, too. And you’re replacing it with a different message that is overshadowing the one that should be front and center right now. Just like Kaepernick should be front and center on that SI cover.

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Nick Young Signs One-Year Deal With Warriors, Old Tweet of Him Bashing Their Fans Resurfaces

On Wednesday, Nick Young agreed to a one-year, $5.2 million deal with the Golden State Warriors, according to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski. The move will get Young incredibly close to capturing his first NBA title, but it will also unite him with the fanbase he bashed on Twitter last year. 

As for how Young will fare in Steve Kerr's pass-heavy offense, he's already given us a glimpse into his thoughts on running that type of gameplan in the past as well. 

Now, people are confused trying to understand how Young could go from hating Warriors fans to joining their team one year later.

Hopefully, time heals all wounds. 

Send all complaints, compliments, and tips to sportstips@complex.com.

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The Craziest NBA Finals Game Ever Just Delayed the Inevitable

CLEVELAND — It started off with a crazy 49-point first quarter from the Cavs, who finished with an even crazier 86 points at halftime. That was topped by the craziest third quarter the NBA Finals has ever seen when a series worth of soap opera like drama was squeezed into 12 minutes. 

Game 4 of the NBA Finals was­ wild, ridiculous, and absurd. We saw Cleveland go bonkers on offense in the first half, the refs call 51 fouls, the seemingly random rescinding of a technical on Draymond Green, and some extracurricular activities from superstars and role players alike that will be dissected for the next two days. When it was all said and done, the Cavs were 137-116 winners and extended the series at least one more game with a physical effort we hadn’t seen through the series' first three contests.  

“We took it to them first and that was very telling for the rest of the game,” Kevin Love said.

So here we are again. The Warriors are up 3-1 and headed back to the West Coast. And while we can draw as many parallels as we want to last year’s historic NBA Finals, the Cavs extending the series only feels like we’re delaying the inevitable this time around.

But before we get to that, Cleveland should be commended for preventing the Warriors from becoming the only team in NBA history to go 16-0 in the postseason. Their chance to do that was pretty much over early Friday as the Cavs blitzed Golden State for an NBA Finals record 49 points in the first quarter and an NBA Playoffs record 86 points after two. And they kept shooting lights out the rest of the way. Cleveland finished shooting 52.9 percent from the field and made an NBA Finals record 24 3-pointers. Through the first three games of the series, Cleveland had only made 31 threes.

Quicken Loans Arena was rocking as the Cavs treated their fans to a rollicking performance led by Kyrie Irving’s 40 points. LeBron James recorded his 9th NBA Finals triple-double, surpassing Magic Johnson for the all-time mark, going for 31, 11, and 10 while Love added 23 and J.R, Smith contributed 15.

“We played a desperate team at home and they came out and handed it to us. Simple as that.”

It was a feel good night for the Cavs and their fans, for sure. The crowd was hyped from the start and the Cavs, who were ripe to be blown out following Game 3’s devastating loss, fed off their energy. Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said there was no special pregame speech. He liked his squad’s attitude during the morning’s shootaround. “Guys were upbeat. No hanging heads,” he said. Maybe the Warriors were too caught up in chasing history? 

“I don’t think there was any thoughts or concerns about history,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We played a desperate team at home and they came out and handed it to us. Simple as that.”

This one will be remembered for the truly bizarre third quarter. We had LeBron’s self-pass off the backboard for a dunk that will go down as one of the Finals’ most memorable plays. Later on, the King and Kevin Durant were jawing at each other and drew duel techs. “We weren't coming to blows, we were just talking,” Durant said. A little over a minute after that, Green was tossed for earning a second technical before he wasn’t. The refs ended up giving it to Steve Kerr instead. Finally, we saw Groingate v. 2017 when it looked like Zaza Pachulia took a swipe at Iman Shumpert’s sensitive area during a scrum for a loose ball.

NBA conspiracy theory junkies will have a field day dissecting that and all the fouls called by the refs in Cleveland's favor, especially in the first quarter. With the Finals enjoying some of their highest ratings in years, we all know the league really wants it to extend as long as possible and early on the zebras seemingly did their part. The Cavs went to the free throw line 22 times in the first 12 minutes. Somewhere in the bowels of Quicken Loans Arena, or back in New York—wherever he was—it was like commissioner Adam Silver was pulling all the right strings to at least extend the Finals to five games.

LeBron Draymond KD Zaza NBA Finals Game 4 2017
Image via USA Today Sports/Ken Blaze

But does this really change anything? Has momentum swung back in the Cavs favor? The Cavs deserve credit for not rolling over and letting the Warriors celebrate a title on their floor. They were gritty, gutty, and grimy, playing physical for the first time all series and roughing up the Warriors. But let’s be real here: the Warriors were their own worst enemy in Game 4. Featuring a ton of isolation and practically none of their signature run and gun offense or precision ball movement, the second half saw the Warriors brick a ton threes and settle for low percentage long twos. Golden State finished shooting 28.2 percent from beyond the arc, well below their 39.6 percent average this postseason. Yes, the Cavs are the second best team in the league and getting one of the Warriors shouldn’t come as a surprise. But the Dubs were due for a dud.

“It was one of those nights where we didn’t have anything clicking,” Steph Curry said

The “Cavs in 7’ chant that broke near the end of the game was cute, an ode to the tweet JR Smith claims he didn’t send out following Game 3. But the chances the Cavs faithful see their team play again in person are slim to none. The Warriors were garbage in Game 4, a hot mess on offense, and now they’re headed home where they have lost just once in their last 16 games. They’ve been the superior team three out of four games. They were the superior team during the regular season and during their run to the Finals. They have a potential championship clinching Game 5 Monday in Oracle Arena where they trounced Cleveland in the first two games of the series and once back in January. Draymond won't be suspended for Game 5 like last year. And most importantly they still have more firepower and more superstars than the Cavs, starting with the biggest difference maker, KD.

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