A Recap of New York Fashion Week Spring 2018

After a week of some of the biggest brands, designers, and celebrities all showing out for New York Fashion Week Spring 2018, it's now time to take a look back at some highlights. During a time when many people are questioning the importance of New York Fashion Week in comparison to its European counterparts, designers delivered some signature moments to lighten the discrediting of the festivities, even if only briefly. Brands like Helmut Lang, Opening Ceremony, Kith, Fenty Puma by Rihanna, and Alexander Wang all brought their own signature aesthetic to their respective shows. Here is a recap of some of the most entertaining shows from New York Fashion Week.

Some of the biggest celebrity cameos of the week came at Ronnie Fieg's Kith Sport show. The designer's second fashion show took place on Thursday night at the Classic Car Club Manhattan, where he showed off upcoming collections with brands like Moncler, Adidas Soccer, Champion, Iceberg, and Nike. Virgil Abloh, Scott Disick, and Carmelo Anthony were among the crowd, but two of the most memorable guests appeared on the runway. First, NBA Hall of Famer Scottie Pippen walked down the catwalk sporting pieces from Fieg's upcoming Nike collaboration. If that wasn't enough, Fieg decided to close out the show by putting a spotlight (literally) onto arguably the best basketball player in the world, LeBron James, who lip-synched the lyrics to Kanye West and Jay Z's “H.A.M.” 

Kith Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Kith's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Randy Brooke/WireImage)

This past Saturday night, Alexander Wang took to Brooklyn to celebrate #WangFest. The mobile show included the likes of Bella Hadid and Kendall Jenner stepping out of an Alexander Wang tour bus before strutting down the Brooklyn streets. Their looks, complete with party style hats that read “WangFest,” further alluded to the show's party atmosphere. Notable attendants included Kim Kardashian West and Kris Jenner, amongst others. Of course, the after party that Wang has become known for did not disappoint either. Cardi B and Ja Rule hit the stage to perform, and Dunkin Donuts, Dominos, and Budweiser took care of the food and drinks for the affair. 

Alexander Wang Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Alexander Wang's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Gotham/GC Images)

Sunday night brought about even more festivities with Rihanna showing off her motocross and surf-inspired Spring 2018 Fenty line at the Park Avenue Armory. This was Rihanna's return to New York after her last two collections were debuted in Paris. Staying true to the theme, dirt bike riders tricked off of ramps over pink sand mountains to start the show. RiRi also took her bow on the back of a motorbike. The show boasted a star-studded front row that included Cardi B, Offset, Big Sean, and Jhené Aiko, to name a few.

Fenty Puma by Rihanna's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show
Fenty Puma by Rihanna's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Randy Brooke/WireImage)

Opening Ceremony decided to show off its Spring 2018 collection a little differently as well. Humberto Leon and Carol Lim debuted their collection using a dance performance titled “Changers,” which was written and directed by Spike Jonze. The collection itself featured plays on the collegiate wardrobe like varsity jackets, club T-shirts, sweatpants, and flannel shirts.

On Monday, Shane Oliver debuted his first collection for Helmut Lang at Pearl River Mart. The collection heavily referenced Lang's archive with a lot of pieces featuring fetish design, and leather accents as an added twist from Oliver. The former Hood By Air designer also included memorable head-turners—like an oversized bra that converts into a bag—in his collection. The ready-to-wear featured a line of Helmut Lang tour merch that featured red and white “HELMUT” branding throughout. ASAP Ferg, Ian Connor, Lil Yachty, Jerry Lorenzo, and more were among those who sat front row. 

Helmut Lang Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Helmut Lang's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Catwalking)

 

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Public School on Working on the Air Jordan XV: “It’s a Love It or Hate It Shoe”

Public School is the definitive product of two New York City natives and their go-getter spirits. In less than 10 years since its 2008 inception, founders Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne —who met while working at Sean John— catapulted their own menswear brand to immense popularity with a high-fashion-meets-streetwear approach to design, racking up multiple awards in the process.

While the style and wearability of the apparel made a name for itself, Public School truly claimed its stake as leaders in the fashion industry when it teamed up with Jordan Brand. After working on exclusive friends-and-family versions of the Air Jordan 1, Air Jordan X, and Carmelo Anthony's M10, the NYC-based brand expanded its horizon and launched the PSNY x Air Jordan XII to the public — a dark-grey luxe rendition that resonated with the purest of sneakerheads and menswear enthusiasts alike. The collab was the precursor to three more Air Jordan XIIs that embodied the brand’s hometown of New York City, as well as Paris and Milan.

After a small world tour with the XIIs, the Public School duo is back home for New York Fashion Week to debut their Spring/Summer 2018 collection and a brand new capsule in collaboration with Jordan Brand. Using the black sheep of the Air Jordan lineage, the XV, Public School re-imagined Tinker Hatfield’s original design in ways never seen before. The collection includes Air Jordan XVs for men in black suede, an olive woven material, and for the first time ever, an Air Jordan XV boot for women.

PSNY x Air Jordan XV
Image via Nike

The successful runway show located in the heart of Chinatown was followed up with a nearby pop-up shop, where the footwear and apparel was available for purchase. There, Complex caught up with the PSNY founders, joined fellow Sean John alumnus and current Senior Director of Energy Projects at Jordan Brand Gemo Wong, to talk about the latest drop.

Check out out the latest episode of #LifeAtComplex for a closer look at the star-studded event, inside the pop-up shop, and interview.

How did Public School’s relationship with Jordan Brand first come about?
Gemo Wong: So I’ve known Dao-Yi for a while, we used to work together. As his brand Public School kind of progressed, it felt like the timing was right to do something especially in the apparel space. The partnership started with apparel first and then we kind of explored footwear

After doing your first footwear collaboration, did you know it would become an ongoing partnership?
GW: We just kind of did what we felt was right. It’s all about time, who we [Jordan] are as a brand and who they are as a brand.

What was the motivation behind using the Air Jordan XV for this collab?
Dao-Yi Chao: It’s starts with a conversation. The great thing about working with Gemo and his team is that, there isn’t a set schedule, there isn’t a set plan. We only work when we feel it’s right. When we a great idea, we take it to him and if he likes the idea, he’ll set things into motion. With the XVs specifically, Gemo’s always challenged us to work on shoes that sort of lie outside of the 1s, IIIs, IVs, Vs, VIs, XIs — the really popular ones that iterated a l lot and so we enjoy that challenge. Coming off working on the XII, changing that iconic shoe into something that was definitively Public School, was something that we wanted to carry over on the XVs. It’s a love it or hate it shoe.

Yeah, even Tinker Hatfield, who designed it, has said that it’s his least favorite Air Jordan.
DC: Did he say that?

GW: He’s said that on paper, yeah.

He’s said that on record. Were there any challenges you faced while designing these Air Jordan XVs?
Maxwell Osborne: Not really. Maybe on the women’s side, trying to make the boot.

DC: That was another idea that was born just out of conversation. Like, “Yo, we wanna do it during Fashion Week during the show, but it’s a women’s show. It would be crazy if we turned the XV into a boot!”

It already is kind of chunky like a boot.
DC: Exactly. We wanted to accentuate the obvious things about the shoes. The fold back on the tongue I guess is what you would call it — all of those things we wanted to really build on top of, but make it feel like our own shoe. That’s the point of any good collaboration. You gotta add something to it. It’s already great in its own realm, but how do you add to it and make it something better?

PSNY x Air Jordan 15 Knee-High Boot
the Public School x Air Jordan XV boot for women. Images via Antonio de Moraes Barros for Getty Images

The tongue of the sneakers feature a “WNL” logo. What does the “We Need Leaders” motto specifically mean to Public School as a brand?
MO: “We Need Leaders” for us, was really a call to action. It was for everybody to step up. Us, our team, everybody around the world, just to step up and be better. It also mean when no one’s looking. So, are you the same type of person when the lights turn off and you go home? Are you the same type of person you show face to when you step out of that? WNL mean a lot to us in terms of special leadership and people stepping up to the plate.

When you first released the first grey PSNY XIIs did you expect such a big reaction?
DC: I don’t know, I didn’t know what to expect.

GW: You always have your fingers crossed. You always go in wishing the best. We took a different approach to it, so we were hoping for a good response, especially in [Public School’s] space, the fashion space, it was good overall.

Did the response play a part in following up with the city series or was it already in the works?
GW: Again it all comes down to what we felt was right timing wise, what these guys are into, and making sure the brands are in tune, so as a evolution as the grey we felt like doing the City pack was a good addition.

DC: We say that thing and always felt it was almost boot-like, the way we molded it out, so we just sampled it in a wheat colorway because it felt like a boot. So from there, again, just from the conversation, they put it into work. We it came back we were like, “What if we flip three colors — the Wheat is so New York— what if we created a colorway for Paris and a colorway for Milan?” That’s how it goes, then we try it out. If it don’t feel right then we keep it moving, but if we’re onto something, I think it all clicks with us and we push it forward.

When that release happened launching the collection over multiple cities, it really changed the way retail works. Do you guys plan to do that again, say with this release?
GW: It all depends on the project, the time, how we feel when we all get together.

PSNY x Air Jordan 15 Olive Suede
A sample version of the Public School x Air Jordan XV collaboration, worn by Jordan Brand designer Frank Cooke. Image via Frank Cooker

Gemo, can you explain your role as head of Energy Projects at Jordan Brand?
GW: I’m Senior Director of Energy Projects. That’s everything from what you see here — footwear, apparel, to anything limited and sought after within the brand.

How do you decide on which people to work with like KAWS, Drake, or Travis Scott?
GW: It just all depends on where the brand is at. I don’t want to feel like we have to do collabs. I feel like we should let collabs enhance the brand, rather than we need them for the brand. It takes the pressure off. There is no, “Oh man, I gotta do a collab this month, next month.” As with this project, it’s just timing, where we are as a brand and if it feels right, then we do it.

Why is it important for Jordan Brand to focus on fashion and lifestyle versus just sports?
GW: We concentrate a lot on sports as well. It just so happens that we do some fashion stuff. You look at our portfolio, we still do a lot in the basketball space with athletes like Russ and all their signature shoes, but we also do stuff in the fashion space. Our brand means a lot to everyone, which could be a gift and a curse. As result, we just try to balance it out.

What was it like working with Diddy back during your time at Sean John?
MO: All three of us met at Sean John actually. How did it feel? It felt great! [Laughs] You got Puff’s son behind you.

DC: That brand, that moment in time sort of represented this idea of aspiration. Everything about Puff, even outside of fashion was you should aspire for something better. I think that really stuck with us. That idea of aspiration, doing something unexpected, but always presenting this idea of aspiration to do something better or to make something better. We all went different routes, but that definitely stuck with us.

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Drake Challenges Himself to a 500-Week Billboard Hot 100 Streak

Drake's eight-year hangout session on the Billboard Hot 100 came to an end this week, but Drake is already looking ahead to the next chart challenge.

The OVO Sound co-founder was missing from the Hot 100 this week for the first time since “Best I Ever Had” hit the charts back in 2009. All told, Drake spent a whopping 431 consecutive weeks on the Hot 100. TMZ bothered Drake outside the Tao restaurant in Los Angeles Wednesday night, ultimately eliciting a three-word response to the news.

“I need 500,” Drake said, narrowly making it inside his vehicle before he had to suffer through the paparazzo's dripping-with-cringe follow-up question of “So what's next, Dancing With the Stars?”

Drake, by a substantial margin, currently boasts the most consecutive weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 since the chart's debut in 1958. The rest of the top ten includes Lil Wayne (326 weeks), Rihanna (216), Nicki Minaj (207), Jay Z (159), Katy Perry (139), and more.

This latest feat is far from the first time a Billboard record has been smashed by Drake. With the release of Views in 2016, he claimed 20 spots on the Hot 100. That record held until the release of this year's More Life, at which point Drake bested himself with 24 simultaneous chart appearances.

Drake's most recent solo single was “Signs,” which premiered back in June during Louis Vuitton's Paris Fashion Week show as part of an OVO Sound-curated playlist created for the line's Spring/Summer 2018 menswear reveal.

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How Rhude, One of the Best L.A. Brands, Started With a Single T-Shirt

In 2012, Rhuigi Villasenor designed a black/white paisley bandana T-shirt. “It was a nod to West Coast culture,” says the 25-year-old L.A.-based designer. It was the very first thing he created for Rhude, the brand he founded a year later, and the piece that helped catapult the label.

Kendrick [Lamar] wanted the T-shirt,” says Villasenor. “Snoop [Dogg] was like, ‘I need about 100 of those.’”

Villasenor had no intention of selling the T-shirt at first. “I didn’t want anyone else to have my look,” he says. But he eventually gave it to Lamar, who wore black and red versions to the BET Awards. “It was beautiful,” he says. “It changed my life.”

Kendrick Lamar Rhude Bandana tee
Kendrick Lamar wearing Rhude Black Bandana T-shirt. (Image via Getty)

At the encouragement of his friends Chris Stamp and Guillermo Andrade, designers of Stampd and 424, respectively, Villasenor also made the bandana T-shirt available to the public. “Chris was like, ‘If you don’t make the shirt, I will,’” Villasenor says with a laugh. “I was like, ‘Oh shit! I gotta make this.’” Soon, other brands were making knock-offs of his design.

Since then, Rhude has built a solid fanbase. The brand, which has expanded from tees to a full line, is one of the best men’s labels around. It’s been worn by celebrities—Big Sean, ASAP Rocky, Kevin Durant, Jimmy Butler, Offset, Future, Bella Hadid—and sold at dozens of the best retailers, such as Barneys, SSENSE, Patron of the New, 424, and Union.

Big Sean Wearing Rhude Peace Camo Hoodie
Big Sean wearing Rhude Peace Camo hoodie. (Image via Getty)

Born in Manila, Philippines, Villasenor was always interested in clothing but a career in fashion didn’t seem viable. His father, who was an architect, wanted him to work in the medical field. “The arts is something they frown upon in the Filipino culture,” he explains. “So I didn’t think about that at all.”

But during his senior year of high school, he started working with TISA, the clothing label by producer and Kanye West collaborator Taz Arnold, helping in any way he could. (He met Arnold at one of TISA’s parties in L.A.) “I was consulting, I did videos and campaigns,” he says. He wasn’t being paid, but he considered the experience valuable. “At the time, I thought TISA was the first driving force in L.A. ever. Prices were increasing, and kids were purchasing. After [TISA], it was like a domino effect. You couldn’t see kids spend just $20 on a T-shirt anymore.”

Kendrick Lamar Rhude Bandana tee
Image via Getty

From there, he began taking pattern making classes and assisting stylists for guys like Big Sean. At 19, he interned for British menswear designer Shaun Samson. “At the time, [Comme des Garcons designer] Rei Kawakubo had just said he was an influential designer so I was like, ‘Damn. If Rei Kawakubo is calling him that then I gotta pay attention,” he says. “Shaun taught me so much about design.”

Growing up, his family had very little money and he couldn’t afford the clothes he wanted to wear. So, he decided to make his own. “It was hard to get fresh,” he says. “You had to create your own, start boosting, or wear bootleg. I wasn’t about to be the kid that wore bootleg.” In 2013, he launched Rhude.

Rhude Fall/Winter 2017
Rhude's Fall/Winter 2017 “Motorpsycho” Collection. (Image via Rhude)

Rhude borrows from Villasenor’s personal stories and relationships. The moniker itself honors his family’s tradition of names that start with “Rh.” Many of the collections are extensions of his emotions and experiences. The Spring 2016 “Sugarland” collection—ripped jeans, tees with cigarette burns, and logo-heavy jackets—was inspired by a breakup with a girl he spent a lot of time with in Texas. “I envisioned a kid who was trying to break out of a small city but didn’t really know how to find a way out,” he explains. “The kid ends up joining the military, comes back with PTSD, and is lost.” The theme bleeds into Rhude’s Spring/Summer 2017 “Electric Eather” and Fall/Winter 2017 “Motorpsycho” collections. “‘Electric Earth’ would be the recover from that breakup,” says Villasenor. “‘Motorpsycho would be the, ‘I’m done. I’m hanging out.’ It’s like I’m writing volumes.”

Rhude Spring 2016
Rhude's Spring 2016 “Sugarland” Collection. (Image via Rhude)

Rhude is still a relatively small operation, with only a staff of six full-time employees. But Villasenor has big plans for his brand. In a few weeks, he’ll release Rhude’s trendy track pants, which ASAP Rocky has already been seen wearing. Later this year, he’ll expand the brand to include womenswear and footwear, as well as a possible collaboration with Virgil Abloh’s Off-White label. “Virgil and I are figuring that out,” he says. “That Off-White x Rhude.” (The pair recently made tie-dye hoodies for friends and family only.) He hopes to someday open a flagship store in Sugar Land, Texas, but one more similar to the Prada Marfa, a permanently installed sculpture by artists Elmgreen and Dragset also in Texas, than a traditional brick and mortar.

“I’m about to take over the world,” he says.

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That Time 2Pac and His Entourage Allegedly Pulled Guns on a High School Football Team

Just hours before 2Pac was gunned down in Las Vegas, a group of teenage fans had a scary, and potentially deadly, run-in with the West Coast rapper. It was a false alarm that involved Glocks, a football game, and In-N-Out Burger.

According to a Jeff Pearlman story published by the Bleacher Report, a group of Long Beach Polytechnic High School students came across the legendary artist after losing a football game in Vegas. While traveling back to their hometown, the players and coaches stopped in Barstow, California, to get a bite at In-N-Out. It was there that one of the students spotted Pac with his entourage.

“Yo, it’s Pac!” Robert Hollie, the team’s backup quarterback said while looking out a bus window. “It’s Tupac! It’s Tupac.”

As we now know, the rapper was one his way to Vegas to see “The Championship: Part II” boxing match featuring Mike Tyson and Bruce Seldon. Pac was fatally shot shortly after the event.

Once the students spotted the rapper, several of them decided to approach him and crew, which included members of the Mob Piru gang. Eyewitnesses said Pac as speaking loudly with his back turned to the students, but once he heard the footsteps approaching, he spun around and two of his crew members pulled guns on the high schoolers.

“Bloods, you can’t be walking up on me like that!” Tupac reportedly shouted. “You don’t know me like that!”

Larry Croom, one of the Poly students who went on to play for the NFL, recalled the incident: “He was extremely paranoid. He started cursing—he was irate. We were just kids, so it was definitely an overreaction.”

Once Pac realized they were just kids, he immediately calmed down and began engaging:

“Where are all y’all little niggas from?” he asked.

“We’re from Long Beach,” Hollie replied.

“Oh, so y’all know my homie Snoop?” Tupac said.

A few nodded. They did indeed.

Everyone seemed to take a deep breath. The Glocks were put away.

The players reportedly spoke to rapper for about five minutes; however, some kids left the situation with a bad taste in their mouth. After loading on the bus, several of the students yelled obscenities at Pac as the bus pulled out of the parking lot.

“There was one guy coming on our bus, and I won’t give up his name,” Croom said. “But he screamed, 'That’s why you got shot! And the next time I hope you die!'”

Several hours later, Pac was shot four times outside the MGM Grand Arena. He died from the injuries nearly a week later.

The tragedy, of course, had a huge effect on the Long Beach Poly football team.

“You see someone, then he’s dead,” says Pisith Vunn, a Long Beach Poly running back. “That’s a lot for a young mind.”

You can (and definitely should) read the full story here

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Travis Scott Addresses Fall During Drake Concert: ‘I Was Floating. I Don’t Fall’

Back in February, the internet went kind of ham after video of Travis Scott's epic fall during a surprise performance at a London stop on Drake's Boy Meets World tour hit the wire. For those who don't remember, there was a huge hole in the middle of Drake's stage that a globe would sit in, but Scott couldn't see it, and took what appeared to be a major spill that resulted in the prop breaking and Drake saying he would issue refunds for the concert.

With an appearance in GQ Style UK's cover story (featured in the Spring/Summer issue of GQ Style, which goes on sale this Thursday), Scott opened up about the fall, although if you let him tell it, he never actually fell. “I didn’t fall, dude, I flew. I was floating. I don’t fall. Shit, nothing happened. Floating is amazing. It’s like getting in a plane. I just flew, man. I’m a magician, like David Blaine. I could never fall. Drake is an amazing person. Also, a magician. He’s a big brother, super-talent, he’s cool.”

But Travis doesn't only discuss last month's fall float. He also talks about his upcoming album, AstroWorld. “It might be the best music that I made,” Scott says. “I have two records on the album that are like, man, they are the best. They tore down AstroWorld to build more apartment space. That’s what it’s going to sound like, like taking an amusement park away from kids. We want it back. We want the building back. That’s why I’m doing it. It took the fun out of the city.”

Travis Scott for GQ UK
Image via GQ Style/Photography by Terry Richardson

Speaking of cities, Travis is in love with Houston. “I feel like Houston is one of the leading things in music culture,” he says. “Everyone loves the Houston culture.” He takes it a step further, though, putting on for the Queen. “It needs to have its own monument, its own moment for artists like me, artists like Beyoncé who set it off. Beyoncé is like the highest level. We all reach for that level.” 

As of now, there's no word on when AstroWorld will be in stores, but hopefully we find out more as Scott's Birds Eye View tour develops. We did find out that he's the David Blaine of rap, which is kind of fire. Check out some more from the GQ Style spread, available this Thursday, below.

Travis Scott for GQ UK
Image via GQ Style/Photography by Terry Richardson
Travis Scott for GQ UK
Image via GQ Style/Photography by Terry Richardson

 

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