Twin Sister Rap Duo Cam & China Team With Barclay Crenshaw for “The Baddest”

23-year-old twins Cam & China are making some of the best rap music in Los Angeles. Coming from Inglewood, they released a self-titled EP last year, packed with beats that slap and lyrics that don't hold back on anything, whether its their disdain for the fakes or their own self-confidence They have more music, videos, and shows in the works for 2018, but first comes this booming collaboration with Barclay Crenshaw, which is the alter ego of successful dance music producer/label head Claude VonStroke. Watch the video for “The Baddest,” featuring a vintage Rolls Royce and some wild tattoos, above. Learn more about how the track came together below.

“Last year I released an album under Barclay Crenshaw of all alternative hip-hop futuristic type stuff,” Crenshaw tells us. “This is the next step in that project. I want to continue on this path and see where it takes me. My first love is hip-hop. Even though I got really into house and techno I always knew I would come back to old school hip-hop and weird beat music.”

He adds, “I really like the energy of Cam and China. They were amazing to work with. They are fun and they have great skill on the mic. The whole session in the studio was easy going and very creative. It really was a collaboration of ideas to make this track.”

Cam adds, “We want women to feel confident when they hear this, despite any negativity thrown your way on a day to day basis whether it’s being compared, bashed, talked about, bullied, unappreciated, disrespected, slept on, or looked down on. Always walk with dignity and move with grace. I hope this motivates women from all ages to work hard, never settle, and more importantly never remove your crown for no one. Show them who’s the baddest. What this track symbolizes to us is that women are powerful when we stick together.”

“I also think it’s a great time for black women, women in general are making history and setting trends,” she continues. “For example Cardi B, Issa Rae, Rihanna, Gabby Douglas, Tiffany Haddish, Michelle Obama, Viola Davis, Loretta Lynch to name a few. I think the time is now and time is up.”

Barclay Crenshaw Tour Dates:

4/12 The Majestic Theater, Detroit, MI
4/13 Elsewhere, Brooklyn, NY 
4/15 Coachella Weekend
4/18 Cervantes Masterpiece, Denver Co 
4/22 Coachella Weekend
4/24 The Independent, San Francisco CA

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Snapchat Won’t Allow Users to Broadcast Live

In a time where all social media platforms seem to mesh together with the same features, Snapchat is the black sheep.

Particularly, the tech company isn't following the trend of allowing users to broadcast live on their mobile devices. TechCrunch reports Snapchat announced today it would include NBC's live Olympics coverage in its app. However, a Snapchat spokesperson specified a livestream feature will not be rolled out to all users. The company doesn't find the feature useful to all users. 

There is some truth in Snapchat's understanding of consumer behavior. Since allowing its users to livestream, Facebook has gotten into some legal battles over allowing controversial content to be broadcasted. For instance, the family of the 73-year-old Cleveland man murdered by the Facebook Killer filed a lawsuit against Facebook on Jan. 19. Additionally, Facebook released its fourth-quarter reports last week, revealing the site experienced a major decline in daily user activity.

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So is Snapchat taking advantage of Facebook's slow decline? Probably not.

Snapchat stressed that providing snippets from broadcasted programs, such as major sporting events and awards shows has cultural value. While the company's new feature will not include comprehensive, full coverage of these events, it will include hot and newsworthy moments helping to summarize the proceedings for those who didn't watch the full program.

Meanwhile, Instagram announced last week that it will launch pre-scheduled posting, which will roll out to all users by early next year.

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Gus Dapperton: Reimagining the Rock Star

When Gus Dapperton's Yellow and Such EP dropped last month, much was made of two things: his dancing and his fashion. 

In one sense, it was to be expected. Dapperton's bowl cut and glittering eyeshadow are sure to turn heads, and his dance moves are a focal point of both videos he's recently shared (“I'm Just Snacking” and “Prune, You Talk Funny”). What the fashion editorials often missed, however, is the quality of the music. 

Since moving to Philadelphia, Dapperton has, in his words, “honed in.” The 20-year-old is committing himself to music full-time for the first time, fronting a band that includes his little sister. He's the oldest member and de facto leader of the group, which is currently on its first international tour.

The last couple of years have moved quickly—it wasn't too long ago that Dapperton was still growing up in Warwick, New York, a farm town that provided Gus with all the back roads and talent shows he needed to get creative. After gaining some local notoriety, he started school in Philadelphia, studying music technology until the play counts started to skyrocket last year. Gus decided to focus on music full-time shortly thereafter. 

The focus hasn't wavered. When we caught up with him, Gus wanted to practice. So we booked some time in a dance studio, he called up a professional, and in between, we talked about what it means to be a rock star in 2018. Watch our latest Music Life above, and get familiar with Gus' music here

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@fuckjerry

 Meme guru @fuckjerry shows us how he got started and how he’s using his success to build an empire. 

Mariah Carey Is Being Countersued by South American Promoters for Canceled Tour Dates

South America promoter Fenix is hitting Mariah Carey back with a lawsuit of its own for claims that she dropped out of 2 shows in Argentina and Chile.

Meet the One-Legged Veteran Who’s Healing His PTSD Through Sneakers

Every morning that Daniel Lister wakes up in his Georgia home and is able to put on a his sneakers, he’s reminded of how lucky he is to be alive. As he reaches down and struggles to pull his Air Jordans onto his prosthetic left leg in his, he’s helping himself heal on the inside, far away from the battlefield in Afghanistan that claimed his limb, his marriage, and a chunk of his sanity.

Lister has gained notoriety on Instagram, amassing over 68,000 followers, through his daily photos of him wearing his sneakers with his prosthetic decorated with Marvel Comics superheroes, but he had to go through a living hell—a life riddled with physical and emotional pain and addiction—to get where he is today.

His legs have always affected his shoe choices. As an overweight child, Lister had to wear corrective footwear, a la Forrest Gump, before he could purchase his first real sneakers. “I was a big-ass baby. I was super fat. I had bow legs because my bones were too soft and couldn’t hold my fat ass up. I had to wear corrective shoes with a bar between my legs,” he says. “The first pair of actual sneakers that I got was the “White/Cement” Air Jordan III in ‘88. I remember getting those and being so excited about it. They changed everything.” He also fell in love with “Aqua” Air Jordan VIII after Michael Jordan wore them in 1993 All-Star Game, and it fostered an appreciation for shoes that wouldn’t fade over the years.

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Image via Daniel Lister

Lister’s passion for shoes has also driven him to start a YouTube channel, where he routinely gives a view of his life from his sneaker room. He posts unboxing videos, shows off his collection, and expresses his views on topics within the footwear industry. The latter is also found on a podcast called The Monday Midsole, which he co-hosts Buckeye City Sole, Polos n Jays, and Unboxed Mike, where they This group of friends has become a support system for Lister, and he’d learn to build a similar brotherhood with them like he had with his fellow soldiers.

The now-36-year-old Lister says he never had much of a decision in life to do anything other than join the military, which he did in 2002. He grew up in various places across the country as a military kid and didn’t know where else to turn when it came time to figure out what he was going to do with his life.

“The reality of it is that I got married super young, cause I’m fucking dumb,” Lister says. “I had to figure out a way to pay bills. I needed medical insurance, because I started having babies. The only way I could do that is through the military. I knew that was how I could pay my bills.”

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Image via Daniel Lister

The Sept. 11 terror attacks didn’t completely inform Lister’s decision to join the military, but they made it easier for him to meet the requirements to join the U.S. Army, as branches lowered requirements for new recruits after 9/11. “I have a GED. I didn’t do so good at high school. When 9/11 happened, it made it easier for me to join, because they started accepting people with GEDs again,” Lister says. “They knew we were going to war, and I joined in February [2002].”

Lister ended up doing four tours in the Middle East (three in Iraq and one in Afghanistan), and it made him feel alive in a way that he couldn’t capture back home in Georgia. The prospect of being in a war—or a fight for that matter—is supposed to chill someone to their core. Violence, and the threat of being killed, is never supposed to be exciting, but it gave Lister a calmness and camaraderie with his fellow troops. “I got to Iraq in September 2003, and that was the only time I was ever truly afraid,” he says. “After you get shot at the for the first time, that shit changes very quick. You’re no longer afraid. There’s anger and power that goes along with that. I was more comfortable there than I ever was back home.”

His job was to clear the way for other troops to make their way across the battlefield, He would blow up bridges, build them, and make sure fields were safe of mines. “If there was something in our way, I’d blow that shit up,” he says.

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Image via Daniel Lister

During his final deployment to Afghanistan, Lister went from safely leading fellow soldiers through war zones  On June 2, 2010, he took the wrong step. Lister’s foot landed on an improvised explosive device, and it went off. “I got lit up,” he remembers. “I had 17 soldiers on the ground. I was doing my job. After a bad step, it blew me up. I never lost consciousness during the event. I remember every detail of it. My foot was gone immediately after the explosion. My right leg was ripped from my ankle to my hip.”

It took about 45 minutes for the medics to get to him, Lister recalls. He was then put on a Blackhawk and flown to the closest aid station where he received 20 blood transfusions to help keep him alive. “Once I got to the aid station in Afghanistan, I don’t remember anything else,” he says. “I think they had me in a medically induced coma. They had to perform a ridiculous amount of surgeries just to stabilize me. With my injuries, by all accounts, I should be dead. It’s a miracle that I’m up and walking. I got blown up on June 2 and I hit Stateside on June 3. Mail doesn’t move that fast. It takes longer for Nike to send me a pair of sneakers than it did for the U.S. military to get me out of Afghanistan.”

Lister says that the medics weren’t able to stabilize him and he kept dying. He was then taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Washington, D.C., where he received serious treatment for his injuries and started an 18-month program to help his life get back to as normal as it was ever going to be ever again. This included revisions on his stump to make it better fit his prosthetic limb. It wasn’t just his right leg that was affected, but doctors also had to fix the tib-fib in his right leg, both of his femurs, and his right hip. His left hand, right arm, and both of his knees had to be reconstructed, too, on top of six skin grafts.

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Image via Daniel Lister

“I was miserable,” he says. “I spent four to five months in a hospital. I wanted to stay in the Army. The Army is how I define myself. Throughout my adult life, that’s what I was. This explosion took that from me, and I had to become something different. If it was just the amputation, I would have been fine. But three out of four of my limbs are trash. I wanted to stay in, because I had grown up in combat since I was 21 years old. I became a man in combat. I was more comfortable there than I was being a father or a husband.”

That’s when it began to set in for Lister that he was going to have to leave the military and do something else with his life. “I went through the tests to see if I could stay in, and I failed them miserably,” he says. “I had to start over. Who was I going to be now?”

Back home in Georgia, riddled with the pain and stress leftover from his nearly life-ending injury, Lister relied on drugs and alcohol to get through his days. After nearly dying, he chose to get sober.

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Image via Daniel Lister

“I had gotten to the point where I was hiding in my room and drinking and popping pills,” he says. “The doctors said, ‘Look, if you want to die at 35, keep doing what you’re doing.’ I said, ‘Bombs can’t kill me, booze isn’t going to kill me.’’

At the height of his addiction, Lister was consuming a half an ounce of weed, an eightball of coke, and a handle of Crown Royal every two to three days. He took the money that he was spending on drugs and alcohol and put them into sneakers, which he didn’t own many of at the time due to the divorce he was going through.

“There was a time when I had a whole lot of shoes, but I also had a really pissed off ex-wife,” he says. “My shoes didn’t survive the divorce. You’ve seen pictures of when people have their cut-up sneakers? I had maybe 10 pairs that made it through that extravaganza.”

It wasn’t just the pursuit of sneakers that inspired Lister to get sober, but rather the effect it would have on his children. “I’m a single father. Unfortunately, my kids got to experience what it’s like to live with an alcoholic and a drug addict. I had to get sober for them,” he says. “I didn’t want to die and have my kids in the foster system.”

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Image via Daniel Lister

Once he became sober, the sneakers started to pile up. “If you go from buying an eightball of coke every other day to not doing that, you’ve got some income,” he says. “So I went and got all these sneakers that I missed out on back in the day.”

The sneakers started to roll in, and Lister started posting them on his Instagram account, One Legged Lister, and he noticed that people were engaging with his content because they rarely saw sneakerheads with a prosthetic limb. “I started posting sneakers that I was wearing everyday on my Instagram, then it started to take off. A lot of people feel shame about [having a prosthetic]. They think it’s ugly. I think it’s the shit. That’s my leg,” he says. “What really hits me is when these kids reach out to me who have cancer or have gone through a tragic accident. They say, ‘You make it OK for me to be this way.’ Those messages are the most humbling experiences I’ve ever had. That was never my intent, it was just about, ‘Here are the kicks I’m wearing today, what do y’all think?’”

There have been negative remarks made on his Instagram page, too, but Lister doesn’t have to police the comments — his followers do it for him. “You’re bound to get people who are like, ‘Ewww gross. Put your leg away,’” he says. “I don’t have to say anything. They get the sort of attention where they have to delete their own comments. Their negativity doesn't define who or what I am.”

He’ll never get his leg back, but Lister has found some sort of peace within his life, and it’s  partly thanks to sneakers. His collection has boomed to over 200 pairs and he’s a regular at sneaker conventions, where kids come up to him to say hi and take pictures. But he still feels the pain every day—that won’t go away. He says his day-to-day pain is consistently a four or five on a scale of ten, but the psychological torment is something that won’t go away. “People can relate to pain, but they can’t relate to PTSD, because they can’t see it. It will be one of the hardest things I have to go through. It’s brutal.”

Lister is piecing his life back together, one sneaker at a time, but it’s not the shoes themselves that make him happy: It’s the relationships he’s forged through collecting. “This sneakerhead community has given me my life back, to some extent,” he says. “It’s made me feel whole again. My friendships that I have now are worth more than my entire sneaker collection to me.”

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Sophia the Robot Took Her First Steps, We’re Doomed

Her legs were made for walking, and that’s just what the humanoid robot Sophia plans on doing. The Hanson Robotics invention named Sophia, which (or is it “who”?) debuted in 2016, now has legs created by robotics company DRC-HUBO. According to CNET, Sophia can now walk at 0.6 miles per hour, compared to the human average of 3.1 miles per hour.

Before being able to walk, Sophia found many other ways to integrate herself into our human world. The robot has appeared on several talk shows and was featured on the cover of Elle Brazil last year. Though we can still outrun Sophia, the robot has a Twitter, which our POTUS has proven time and time again is way more powerful than being able to walk quickly. She also dressed up as a Jedi for the latest Star Wars film, which is fascinating considering her creators still can't seem to find her a wig. 

Sophia’s human-like form is part of Hanson’s goal of integrating Sophia, and robots like Sophia, into fields such as medical therapy and factory work. With these new legs Sophia could also look for work as a part-time model, since the robot is now nearly 6 feet tall. If this doesn’t feel like the beginning of a terrible Will Smith movie to you, go ahead and enjoy a video of Sophia taking her first steps right here.

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It’s Time to Stop Using the Term “SoundCloud Rap”

As of right now, we promise not to call anything SoundCloud rap.

Despite how restrictive that label was, we all knew what it meant. It described a unique scene that existed on the SoundCloud platform and for a minute, it was useful. Since then, things have changed. Artists like Lil Pump, Trippie Redd, and Ski Mask The Slump God are now a part of the mainstream discussion. They're in the charts, on the radio, and selling out shows around the world. It's much bigger than SoundCloud.

For some reason, a lot of people are still calling it all SoundCloud rap. Let's stop. In our latest P&P Update, we discuss the term SoundCloud rap, explain why we're done using it, and look to the future.

R.I.P. SoundCloud rap. It was fun while it lasted.

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The Most Anticipated TV Shows of 2018

There are a slew of promising new shows on the horizon for 2018. From grown-ish and Black Lightning to The Chi and Roseanne to The Assassination of Gianni Versace and Unsolved: The Murders of Tupac and the Notorious B.I.G. these are some of the most anticipated shows on TV, Netflix, Hulu, and streaming services.

The Lakers Might Call on Kendrick Lamar to Help Improve Their Team

On Monday night at the Staples Center, the Lakers will face the Warriors and there will be a special halftime show commemorating Kobe Bryant. The team plans to retire both jerseys he wore, No. 8 and No. 24, respectively. Since his retirement in April 2016, the Lakers have revitalized the team with a young core; among them are Lonzo Ball, Kyle Kuzma, Brandon Ingram, Julius Randle, Jordan Clarkson, and others.

Rob Pelinka, the general manager for the Lakers, is one of the most important people in Kobe’s career. He spent 18 years as his agent before becoming the Lakers GM, and really, one of Kobe’s closest friends. Now, with Bryant away from the purple and gold, Pelinka is finding new ways to spark inspiration within the team, motivating them to reach the caliber and chemistry of past Laker squads.

It starts with talking with a few renaissance men who strive to change the world every day. In an interview with USA Today, Pelinka shared his idea of “Genius Talks.” He brings the team to people who are the absolute best in their industry in order to create an inspired culture within the Laker brand.

The first was Elon Musk, and they visited his SpaceX lab in nearby Hawthorne in October. Pelinka said:

“It was like going to the set of Ironman; just unbelievable. The players were just amazed. It was the coolest thing. One of the guys said (to Musk), 'Well we play against other teams, so how do you study your competition, or what's your way of staying No. 1?' And he said, 'My competition is irrelevant to me. If what I'm doing, I do excellently, then it doesn't matter.' And so you pick up little things like that.”

The next was Jeffrey Katzenberg, who co-founded Dreamworks and was the head of Disney studios from 1984 to 1994. The Hollywood mogul told them, according to Pelinka:

“'You know, when I was making the movie Raiders of the Lost Ark, I had a mantra in my head, and it was exceed expectations.'” He said, ‘I wanted to sit in the back of the theater when the kids were watching, and I wanted them to be jumping out of their seat. I wanted to exceed their expectations.’”

A person who will undoubtedly inspire the Lakers is Kendrick Lamar, and it sounds like Pelinka may lock in the TDE rapper for an upcoming session of “Genius Talks.” Lamar's had an incredible year with the release of Damn and his seven Grammy nominations

Pelinka further explains that “Genius Talks” is meant to tap into the team's various interests to make them better people and better basketball players.

“Magic and I wanted to identify geniuses in their space. Our core belief is that more developed men make better basketball players. I think Magic, if you look at how diversified he is with his interests. Kobe, the guy studies everything under the sun. I'm reading a biography right now on Leonardo da Vinci, and he has the ultimate curiosity of all things. If he's painting a hummingbird, he wants to like take its tongue and see what it looks like so he can paint it. So geniuses in life, right, can inspire us on how to be better.”

“So once a month, we try to do that, and the reason that it, to me, is important, is it shows the way we're really trying to do things differently, and it gets back to what I said at the beginning: Support and service. How can we bring things to the guys to make them better human beings and better Lakers basketball players?”

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