LaVar Ball Keeps Feud Going by Posting GIF of Himself Dunking on Donald Trump

LaVar Ball isn't going to let go of a great marketing opportunity his feud with Donald Trump. On Tuesday, Ball appeared on CNN's New Day where he used Trump's words against him, complaining that he “didn’t get a thank you” from the President of the United States for the three pairs of red, white, and blue Big Baller Brand sneakers he sent to the White House. 

Back in November, Ball was adamant that he would not be saying thank you to Trump, even after he claimed to be the one who spoke to Chinese president Xi Jinping​, and helped bring LaVar's son LiAngelo, as well as former UCLA freshmen Jalen Hill and Cody Riley, back home. “I don't have to go around saying thank you to everybody,” he told Chris Cuomo during their interview last month. 

Earlier today, LaVar added more fuel to the fire by posting a GIF which shows him dunking on Trump. 

When the GIF zooms in on the Twitter app on the phone, you can see a tweet from Ball's account, saying, “Stay in yo lane @realDonaldTrump! The Big Baller will put you on a poster.” It will probably only be a matter of time before Trump responds and gives LaVar exactly what he wants—more free yet valuable publicity. 

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LA Police Caught on Body Cam Planting Drugs in Black Suspect’s Wallet

During the pretrial hearing for 52-year-old Ronald Shields, who has been charged with a felony hit-and-run and possession of cocaine, Shield's attorney Steve Levine argued that the drugs were planted on his client at the time of the arrest. Even though the LAPD has been keeping body cam videos from these arrests away from the public eye, CBS2 News Investigative Reporter David Goldstein was able to obtain the footage of Shields' arrest which appears to show officers placing drugs in the suspect's wallet. 

The officers were possibly unaware that the body cam video also captures and saves footage 30 seconds prior to when the camera is activated. That is when the alleged planting of cocaine took place. 

One angle from the body cam shows LAPD officer Gaxiola picking up Shields' wallet off the ground and showing it to officer Samuel Lee while motioning to the suspect as if to say that the wallet belongs to him. After putting the wallet back down, a small bag with a white substance, which later tested positive for drugs, was picked up off the street and eventually placed in Shields' wallet. 

In a sworn testimony delivered by Lee prior to the hearing, he claims the drugs were found in Shields' left front pocket. However, Levine points to a specific moment where the cocaine was in Gaxiola's hand before it ended up in Shields' wallet. “There’s a little white square here in his hand,” he said. “I believe the video shows the drugs were in his right hand and transfers to his left hand.”

The LAPD have opened an internal investigation into the use of body cams by officers in the field.

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Meet Willo Perron, the Creative Genius Behind Jay-Z’s ‘4:44’ Album Art and Tour

Hunched over his laptop, Willo Perron is scrolling through a digital mock-up of an unreleased project for Jay-Z’s 4:44 album. Over several peach-colored pages, in simple black Larish Neue font, there are release dates for 4:44 in different countries, photos of the 4:44 ads plastered on billboards, buses, taxis, and subway stations that teased the rapper’s thirteenth studio album, and more. “It’s really a manual for the 4:44 brand,” he says, sitting in his West Hollywood studio on an October afternoon.

Perron, a multi-disciplinary designer and director, collaborated with Jay-Z to concept the packaging and creative direction for 4:44. He designed the album artwork and played a seminal role in the brilliant rollout that included the mysterious “4:44” ads and the black and white teaser starring Oscar winner Mahershala Ali, which premiered during the 2017 NBA Finals. “We went through a few other iterations of what the record was going to be called,” Perron says in his first extensive interview. “When we landed on 4:44, I was like, ‘It’s just this color and these digits.’ We wanted to do a really didactic campaign.”

While he won’t say much about it, he also designed the set and stage visuals for the official 4:44 Tour, which kicked off late last month. During the show, Jay-Z performed on an octagonal stage, placed in the middle of the stadium, with eight vertically-suspended screens hovering above him that showed various camera angles from the stage and footage of peers and family, some of which he erased himself from.

Perron first worked with Jay-Z on the rapper’s 2012 American Express UNSTAGED performance at South by Southwest. But he’s been behind the scenes of other memorable album covers, live shows, retail spaces, and videos for years. In 2008, he worked on Kanye West’s critically acclaimed Glow in The Dark Tour. Rihanna has enlisted him to creative direct many of her performances, including her Diamonds Tour, ANTI Tour, and her 2016 MTV Video Vanguard Award production. “I guess after years of successful Kanye and Rihanna stuff, you eventually get that call [from Jay-Z],” he says. He also designed the set and stage visuals for Drake’s 2013 Would You Like A Tour? and built several of Stüssy’s retail locations. Most recently, he was responsible for the blockbuster Nike x NBA global launch, where the league’s new jerseys were revealed behind three moving big screen monoliths.

The titles creative director and art director have become commonplace today. Nearly all of the top acts in music have at least one consigliere in their team. The Weeknd has La Mar Taylor. Mike Carson oversees Big Sean’s project. West, over the years, has built an entire team of collaborators under Donda, his well-regarded creative company. But when Perron first worked with West, the profession didn’t exist. He didn’t set out to become one either. “Back in the day, I think that was more management in the artists’ ears,” he says. “I don’t think anyone really cared about titles, but I was like, ‘If I’m going to do this everyday, with this guy, it can’t just be ‘Kanye’s entourage has a couple creative guys in there.’ It felt like a lack of respect for the craft. But it definitely wasn’t intentional.”

“Willo is the original,” adds Matt George, the man behind streetwear emporiums Nomad and Stüssy in Toronto and Vancouver. George has known Perron for almost 15 years and has worked with him on various projects, including Stüssy’s brick and mortar locations. “Willo’s one of the guys that made that term synonymous with these kids. You hear people all the time now say they’re creative directors, but he is the truest sense of that word.”

For the last two decades or so, Perron has masterminded some of the biggest projects, for some of the biggest artists and brands in the world. But after all the success, where does he want to go from here?

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Russell Wilson Called Out for Appearing to Make a Mockery of the NFL’s Concussion Test

During the third quarter of the Seahawks’ game against the Cardinals on Thursday night, Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson took a hard hit to the head from Arizona linebacker Karlos Dansby. Dansby was flagged for the hit, and Wilson was sent to the sideline after the game’s referee Walt Anderson noticed that he looked a little woozy. He was instructed to undergo the NFL’s concussion test before checking himself back into the game.

But Wilson wasn’t gone from the game for very long. He did run over to the Seahawks’ sideline, and he did get under the medical tent to give the appearance that he was going to take the concussion test. But as soon as the Seahawks’ medical staff put the tent up to begin the evaluation, Wilson ran out of it and appeared to say, “I’m fine,” as he did. He missed just one play before getting right back in the game—without ever taking the test that all NFL players are supposed to take when there’s a chance they may have sustained a concussion.

You can see Wilson’s brief pit stop on the Seahawks’ sideline here.

NBC’s Mike Tirico pointed out what Wilson did to those at home, and many of them wondered if what Wilson did was allowed. They also called him out for seemingly making a mockery of a test that is designed to protect players from taking part in games after suffering concussions.

Wilson is a guy who seems to take concussions seriously. At least, seriously enough to invest in a water company that manufactures a product that is supposed to, in theory, help players recover from concussions. And after the game, he tried to downplay what he did by saying that Anderson sending him to the sideline was just a misunderstanding in the first place.

“I was just trying to move my jaw. I was like, 'Ah, man, it stuck,'” Wilson said, according to ESPN.com. “I think I was kinda like laying down on the ground for a second just trying to get my jaw, and I think Walt thought maybe I was injured or something like that. I told him I was good, I was good, and he said, 'Come off the field.' Walt did a great job, first of all. He made the smartest decision. I was fine, though, 100 percent.”

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But if the NFL allows Wilson to slide for skipping out on his concussion test, they are going to be setting a dangerous precedent by allowing players to determine when they’re “fine.” So we wouldn’t expect the league to allow Wilson to get off here without a fine or some kind of warning about checking out of a concussion test.

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#LifeAtComplex: Limited Edition Trophy Room Air Jordan 17’s

#LifeAtComplex is a daily vlog that offers an inside look at Complex. Watch as Tony Mui takes viewers behind-the-scenes in the office—you never know who or what will pop up.

On today's episode a viewer submits his resume and video application in a very unique and creative way. Zoe approves of this tactic as well as the rest of the video editors. Later on Russ Bengston receives an exclusive pair of Trophy Room Air Jordan 17's from Marcus Jordan. Not to be out done by Russ, Beija also shows off a pair of Aleali May's Air Jordan 1.  

 

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DJ Khaled and Asahd Khaled Show Off Their Sneaker Collections on Complex Closets

DJ Khaled is back to break the Internet once again with Joe La Puma for Complex Closets, and this time he brought his son Asahd along to show their now-shared sneaker collection and to celebrate his first birthday.

During the episode, Khaled gives another look at his sneaker closet, which now includes sneakers for his son, Asahd, who already owns exclusive Air Jordans. He gives an in-depth look at his own “Grateful” Air Jordan IIIs that Jordan Brand gave him to celebrate his album going platinum, and he explains that the first four pairs have a misspelling on them and are worth more money. Khaled also shows unreleased Air Jordans, such as the Air Jordan IIIs for Russell Westbrook, Drake’s University of Kentucky pack, the friends-and-family version of the Kaws x Air Jordan IV, the Air Jordan Vs for Mark Wahlberg, the “Denim” Air Jordan IIIs, and tells a touching story of how he received the Air Jordan 1s for Craig Sager. He also talks about Jay Z signing a pair of the Reebok S. Carters for him, responds to Lil Yachty wanting to battle his closet, and hints that Asahd might have his own Air Jordan sneaker on the way, all while giving more keys to life.

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The Best Shows About Serial Killers

The horrors of the real world are tame compared to some of the images on these shows featuring serial killers, prepare to have your mind bludgeoned.

Yellowstone Supervolcano Could Explode Sooner Than Expected (Which Still Isn’t That Soon)

If you're somebody who enjoys living, you may have been disappointed by some news making the rounds on Thursday that seemed to imply a supervolcano sitting beneath Yellowstone National Park could erupt sometime soon, taking out all life on Earth when it does.

This slightly concerning news came about after researchers from Arizona State analyzed some materials they found in fossilized ash from the volcano's previous eruption, and saw changes in composition and temperature that built up in just a few decades. As the New York Times put it:

The early evidence, presented at a recent volcanology conference, shows that Yellowstone’s most recent supereruption was sparked when new magma moved into the system only decades before the eruption. Previous estimates assumed that the geological process that led to the event took millenniums to occur.

Furthermore, as National Geographic points out, the last of three major eruptions over the course of 2 million years occurred roughly 630,000 years ago and, when it did, it created a 40 mile wide crater (the Yellowstone caldera) that makes up most of the park. The supervolcano at Yellowstone is capable of unleashing an eruption about 2,500 times as powerful as Mt. St. Helens' 1980 eruption, which killed 57 people. That would mean a burst that could cover most of the U.S. in ash and potentially plunge the planet into volcanic winter. Additionally, the previous eruption (meaning before the one that happened 630,000 years ago) happened in a similar timeframe, as it shot its wad about 1.3 million years ago.

So give or take 40,000 years.

This got people buzzing that an extinction level event could be impending because science is frequently boring since it's not sensationalistic (that NYT article, which was very informative and well written, put my ass to sleep). However, as noted by Esquire, a massive volcanic discharge is not impending. In fact, the story is relevant because scientists are now realizing how quickly factors for a supereruption can come together.

“It’s shocking how little time is required to take a volcanic system from being quiet and sitting there to the edge of an eruption,” said Hannah Shamloo, an ASU grad student who spent weeks at the Yellowstone site. Previously, as the excerpt above mentions, scientists thought supereruptions would exhibit signs over the course of thousands of years. Now they believe it could happen in a human lifetime. The next eruption is probably coming soon relative to the pace that Earth's geology works at, but that is slow AF in terms of human lifespan. Don't panic over hyperbole.

Additionally, Michael Poland, the scientist who runs Yellowstone's Volcano Observatory said “We haven't seen anything that would lead us to believe that the sort of magmatic event described by the researchers is happening.” Sounds like your great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great grandkids' problem.

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