Ryan Coogler Reveals How Kendrick Lamar Got Involved With ‘Black Panther: The Album’

The anticipation for Marvel’s Black Panther flick is getting stronger and stronger each day. But perhaps equally anticipated is the film’s soundtrack produced Kendrick Lamar and his label Top Dawg Entertainment.

In the days leading up to the release of Black Panther: The Album, director Ryan Coogler spoke to NPR about the project and how the TDE crew eventually became involved. He revealed that the initial plan was for Kendrick to contribute only a few songs to the film; however, the rapper’s role became much greater after he was given an extended look at the movie.

“I've been a massive Kendrick fan ever since I first heard him, since his mixtapes, and I've been trying to track him down,” Coogler said. “Eventually I caught up with him a couple years ago—first with Anthony 'Top Dawg' Tiffith, who runs his label, and then later on sat down with him and Kendrick and just spoke about much his music affected me. He talked about my movies that he had seen, and we said if the opportunity comes, we'd love to work with each other on something.”

Shortly after K-Dot completed his fourth studio album Damn, Coogler reached out to the rapper to discuss his involvement.

“To Marvel's credit, they really supported the idea of getting some songs from him,” the director explained. “At first, he was just going to do a few songs for the film, and then he came in and watched quite a bit of the movie, and the next thing I know, they were booking a studio and they were going at it.”

TDE producer Sounwave told NPR that the team had started working on the album during Kendrick’s Damn Tour last summer, and that about half of the soundtrack’s concepts were developed while on the road.

“[During] The Damn Tour, we probably came up with 50 percent of it — the production, the hooks and ideas,” he said. “When we got back from the tour in September, that's when we were able to execute our ideas and reach out to people we respect and whatnot … kind of just put the stamp on it. So, I want to say those two months was the most vital on that tour, in terms of creative process.”

Black Panther: The Album includes appearances by everyone from SZA and the Weeknd to James Blake and Travis Scott to Vince Staples and Jorja Smith. The film’s score was helmed by Coogler’s previous collaborator Ludwig Göransson, who is best known for his work with Childish Gambino. This fact made many fans wonder: Why wasn’t Childish included on the soundtrack?

Though the “Redbone” artist didn’t receive a credit on Black Panther: The Album, it turns out he did contribute to the film’s sound. Rolling Stone’s film critic Peter Travers pointed this out in his recent review, in which he applauded the composer’s work as well as the various hip-hop artists who assisted him.

“[…] It's fair to mention Ludwig Goransson's rousing score with hip-hop song contributions from the likes of Kendrick Lamar, Sam Dew, Vince Staples and Childish Gambino,” he wrote.

We’ll have to wait and see just how big Childish’s contribution was.

As we wait for the album to drop, you can check out some its previously released singles here. Black Panther: The Album is set to release this Friday (Feb. 9), one week before the film hits U.S. theaters. 

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Offset Apologizes for ‘Queer’ Lyric: ‘My Passion for Fashion Has Lead Me to a Lot of Gay People’

Offset is currently on the receiving end of major backlash after people noticed a particular line in his verse on YFN Lucci’s song, “Boss Life.” The song has been out since December, but the visuals for the track were released this week, which attracted more people to the song who finally heard one of Offset’s controversial lines: “Pinky ring crystal clear, 40k spent on a private Lear/60k solitaire/I cannot vibe with queers.”

The “I cannot vibe with queers” line has stirred up a lot of feelings. For the record, the dictionary definition of queer means strange or odd, but it has for several decades been used in slang to mean gay (in fact, it was specifically selected because it meant strange, so that the word could be used in a derogatory manner). Nowadays, it has become a politically charged term often used by people who want to identify as part of the LGBTQ spectrum but without subscribing to a specific label (the Q in LGBTQ stands for queer.)

Many people pointed out the hypocrisy in the line: at the same time that Offset claims he can’t “vibe” with gay people, he constantly wears designer clothing made by gay men and profits off a business that was, at least in part, built by people who identify as queer.

In addition, some pointed out that Migos have caught heat for homophobic comments in the past. In a February 2017 interview with Rolling Stone, Quavo said the “world is f*cked up” because Makonnen’s fans supported him after he came out as gay; he also suggested their fellow Atlanta rapper had damaged his reputation and credibility by coming out. They later issued an apology. In March, Quavo was asked about his reaction once again, and among other things, said: “I got a record with Frank Ocean. That closes my case.”

Finally, Hennessy Carolina, who is Cardi B’s sister, is a lesbian. Cardi B and Offset got engaged last year. 

But among all the outrage, there were still some people who defended Offset. Many decried how quick everyone is to call out anything that is remotely offensive these days, while others wondered if the word is even that bad, or if Offset used it offensively.

Following the controversy, Offset took to his Instagram to apologize. He claims he really was using the word in its original sense, that is, to mean strange or odd. “I got love for all people,” he wrote. “I'm not in a place where I'm hating like that.”

He went on to say: “My passion for fashion has lead me to a lot of gay people.” He also insisted he has “mad respect” for them. He was looking for words that rhymed, and found that queer not only rhymed but thematically fit in with the rest of his verse.

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Cardi B Is in No Rush to Finish Her Debut Album

We probably shouldn't expect Cardi B's debut album anytime soon.

For the latest update on the still-in-progress untitled album, Cardi B confirmed Sunday that she's taking her time to craft something that feels “right.” As previously teased, Cardi added that she's finished multiple songs for the debut that were later shelved because she didn't think they were album-worthy. “I have a lot of pressure on me,” Cardi tweeted:

When a fan posited that she should host private listening sessions for the album to crowdsource feedback, Cardi revealed she's considered doing exactly that:

Cardi has made similar comments before, most notably in her recent Rolling Stone cover story. She said she has “six, seven solid songs” she feels are album quality, though she admitted her opinion of them could very well change within a month. “It's not as fun to do music,” she said. “My mind doesn't flow as free 'cause I have so much on my mind.”

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Though many are placing pressure on Cardi to capitalize on the success of her breakout hit “Bodak Yellow” (and the string of hit features she's released since), others—including J. Cole—have advised her to ignore those expectations and just worry about the work. “You already won,” Cole told her in September. “Just drop and repeat.”

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Post Malone Says Justin Bieber Has Given His ‘Culty’ Church $10 Million

Post Malone’s recent feature in Rolling Stone was very revealing. We learned about his love for the Olive Garden, his extensive—and wildly expensive—loafer collection, and his “super religious” past.

In addition, we learned Malone's feelings about another super-religious person, his “genuine friend” Justin Bieber. The “Rockstar” rapper said that Bieber is “a fucking awesome, great dude,” but is concerned about the pop star’s relationship with the controversial Hillsong Church. 

“It's a total cult,” Malone said. “He's already given them, like, $10 million.” (A “source close to Bieber” denied that figure to RS.

On top of everything else, we found out that Malone is a gun-obsessed conspiracy theorist who might be preparing for the apocalypse. The 22-year-old rapper discussed his arsenal of weapons after writer Jonah Weiner noticed a copy of Guns & Ammo on his counter.

“I love shooting. The feeling is pure…inebriation. It's like hitting a punching bag to let off steam,” he said before showing off his collection of firearms, including an M14, a .44 Desert Eagle hand cannon, an M1911 pistol, and a couple of Glocks. “[…] They're fun, they're practical, and bad shit happens. If you hurt me, I'm gonna hurt you back […] The world is going to shit. They're taking away a lot of our rights. We have a shitty thing going on in the White House—I don't like Trump. But I don't think it's just him. Something's coming.”

His paranoia isn’t too surprising considering his interests in “alternative news” and “conspiracy shit.”

“There's crazy shit that goes on that we can't explain. Chemtrails and shit,” he said. “Like, they have a gun that gives you a heart attack, and they can't tell the difference.”

Malone also discussed his experience as a white rapper and the criticism he’s faced from the hip-hop community. He specifically addressed a 2015 incident in which Charlamagne tha God suggested he wasn't doing enough to help the Black Lives Matter movement.

“I wish I'd said, ‘What are you doing for Black Lives Matter?’ Some sassy shit to shut him up. Like, maybe my music's not the best, but I know I'm not a bad person, so you're just being a hater,” Malone said. “He's not a good person. He hates me because I'm white and I'm different.”

You can read the full interview at Rolling Stone’s website

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Travis Scott’s ‘AstroWorld’ Tour Will Feature Amusement Park Rides

Travis Scott, music's leading inciter of punk rock riots, has been in a plethora of headlines over the past few days. But all of them have nothing to do with his music, which is bigger and more ubiquitous than ever. In a new interview with Rolling Stone's Jonah Weiner, Scott—during multiple chats backstage on his recent tour with Kendrick Lamar—offered a slice of insight into his current creative process.

Scott has been working on new music while on the road, something that's clearly invigorated him. “Just chillin', recording,” Scott said of his current approach to cutting new tracks. “Formulating a story, the picture I'm trying to paint. It's fun making music on the road. I got a whole studio bus.”

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Scott's forthcoming AstroWorld, which still doesn' have a release date, takes its name from a now-closed amusement park Scott frequented when he lived in Texas. “It had a Dungeon Drop, Greezed Lightnin', Superman,” Scott said. “It was a way of life—fantasies, imagination.” For the eventual AstroWorld tour, Scott is planning to bring the amusement park vibe with him by literally surrounding himself with actual rides. “I don't know why it hasn't been done already—I think people just don't do shit,” he said. “Who makes stages these days that are cool?”

Elsewhere on the new music front, Scott has plenty of tracks already in the bag with Quavo. During a Migos interview with Montreality last week, Quavo—at around the 2:22 mark in the video below—said the joint album should drop soon. “We've been making a whole bunch of records; we got a lot of records together right now, we've probably got like 20 records, we just need to get some time and just sort 'em out,” he said.

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Soul Singer Charles Bradley Dead at 68

Legendary soul singer Charles Bradley has died at the age of 68 following a yearlong battle with cancer.

The tragic news comes about a year after the energetic performer, who was often compared to James Brown, announced he was diagnosed with stomach cancer. Though he eventually returned to the stage following several treatments, Bradley was forced to cancel his remaining fall 2017 dates after learning the cancer had spread to his liver.

“I love all of you out there that made my dreams come true,” he said in a statement released earlier this month. “When I come back, I’ll come back strong, with God’s love. With God’s will, I’ll be back soon.” He’ll be taking time off for recovery and treatment.”

Bradley began his music career in the late 1970s, but remained under the radar until he was in his 60s. According to Rolling Stone, he finally caught his big break when Daptone Records co-founder Gabriel Roth saw his Brown impersonation and connected him with producer Tom Brenneck. Shortly after, Bradley would release his debut studio album No Time for Dreaming (2011), which was followed by Victim of Love (2013) and Changes (2016). The latter project received wide critical acclaim, with most of the praise going toward the title track, which was a soulful cover of the Back Sabbath ballad.

Following the news of Bradley’s death, many artists, industry figures, and fans went to social media to pay their respects. His death comes less than a year after the passing of another Daptone soul legend, Sharon Jones.

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Kendrick Lamar Shares Thoughts on Wack Rappers, Ghostwriting, and Drake’s Music

This year belongs to Kendrick Lamar. For the latest chapter in the Damn era, Lamar appears on the cover of the new issue of Rolling Stone. The instaclassic interview sees Lamar reflecting on his recent successes and the state of the world around him, while also answering lighter inquiries about his favorite Drake songs and his unknowing involvement in Taylor Swift's public feud with Katy Perry.

 

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At the top of the interview, Lamar is asked to reveal his vices. For Lamar, the biggest vice is being addicted to the chase of his work. “It turns into a vice when I shut off people that actually care for me, because I'm so indulged spreading this word,” he told writer Brian Hiatt. “Being on that stage, knowing that you're changing people's lives, that's a high.”

For Damn, Lamar said, the initial goal in the studio was to make a “hybrid” of good kid, m.A.A.d city and To Pimp a Butterfly. “That was our total focus, how to do that sonically, lyrically, through melody—and it came out exactly how I heard it in my head…It's all pieces of me ,” he said.

Asked about being “on some level” a pop artist, Lamar gave an insightful answer sprinkled with wink-winks:

It gets tricky because you can have that one big record, but you can still have that integrity at the same time. Not many can do it…wink-wink [laughs]. Still have them raps going crazy on that album and have a Number One record, wink-wink. Call it whatever you want to call it. As long as the artist remains true to the craft of hip-hop and the culture of it, it is what it is.

Lamar also gave his official definition of a “wack artist,” originally referenced on the Damn track “Element.” According to Lamar, a wack artist is someone seeking approval by using other people's art and chasing other artists' versions of success. “Everybody's not going to be able to be a Kendrick Lamar,” he said. “I'm not telling you to rap like me. Be you. Simple as that.”

And elsewhere, Lamar shared his thoughts on ghostwriting, which has obviously been a hot topic in rap in recent years. He said that he feels it's impossible to consider yourself one of the best rappers if you use a ghostwriter to create your songs. “I called myself the best rapper. I cannot call myself the best rapper if I have a ghostwriter,” he said. “If you're saying you're a different type of artist and you don't really care about the art form of being the best rapper, then so be it. Make great music. But the title, it won't be there.”

Hiatt and Lamar later touched on “Humble,” Trump, Drake (“I got a lot of favorite Drake songs”), Beyoncé, Future, his relationship with Bono, fielding acting offers, and—seriously—a ton more.

Read Lamar's full Rolling Stone interview, featuring photography by Mark Seliger, right here.

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21 Savage: ‘I Don’t Think People Really Understand How Hard It Is to Be Black’

21 Savage recently sat down with Rolling Stone to talk about the road he has taken to get to where he is now, which includes his debut album Issa that debuted at No. 2. Savage’s road started with struggle, and although he can now count the number of M’s in his bank account (spoiler: there’s eight), there are still setbacks, most notable among them racial issues and the haters.

“I don't think people really understand how hard it is to be black,” Savage said. “Especially when you coming from nothing. In the hood, there's already a lot of hate just amongst us black people. We killin' each other and everybody else killin' us too. We poor. And the world hates us.”

Issa was a departure from Savage’s earlier works in that the rapper made an effort to diversify the topics he raps about. Tracks on the project are more socially conscious than the rapper has ever been musically; “Nothing New” in particular addresses racism and police brutality in the most biting way: “Shit getting outrageous/They treat us like slaves then lock us in cages/I used to sell dope, nigga, now I can’t vote/Popping Percocets to kill the pain, I can’t cope/Anger in my genes/They used to hang us up with ropes/Civil rights came, so they flood the hood with coke.” The rapper also mentions Martin Luther King’s assassination and includes a shout-out to Rosa Parks. Clearly, the man has substance. But Savage didn’t feel like he got the recognition he deserved.

“People always say I don't ever talk about that type of shit, then when I talk about that type of shit, they do everything in their power to not talk about that song,” he explained. “They don't give me the credit. Fuck 'em.”

That “fuck ‘em” attitude extends beyond this particular issue. While he certainly took some stylistic and tonal challenges on Issa, branching out into love songs and singing, Savage admits that one of the motivations for that were the critics who say all his songs sound the same. “I made sure I made certain songs just so people couldn't say every song sound the same,” he admitted. “I was sangin’. That's what everybody else doin'. Shit. Might as well.”

But other criticisms, especially those directed at his style of rapping, are harder to combat and therefore seem to annoy the rapper a lot more. “I don't feel like nobody who they say [is] mumble rap mumbles,” he said. “They don't understand my slang or my accent. They don't know how to categorize it, 'cause it's art. They're just trying to bring it down.”

But Savage doesn’t seem too bothered. He knows he’s got plenty of fans and that he can offer them something no one else can. “They feel like I'm telling the truth—'cause I'm telling the truth,” he added. “That's why a lot of people gravitate towards me: I'm a real nigga in a fake-ass industry.”

And at the end of the day, Savage seems to be more than comfortable with such a legacy. “Even if I ain't the famous-est, the richest, the best: As long as I know I kept it real and didn't backstab nobody, I sleep good at night.” 

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How Draymond Green’s Suspension in Last Year’s Finals Changed NBA History

There comes a crossroads in every sport where a single play or moment transforms everything that comes after. The ripples affect everything. Sometimes they are more like a tsunami, and an entire sport is restructured. That’s what occurred when LeBron James casually tripped Draymond Green and then stepped over him in Game 4 of the 2016 NBA Finals, provoking an emotional Green to whip his right hand at James’ groin in retaliation.

Because of Draymond’s series of kicks to Steven Adams’ baby-making area in the Western Conference Finals, and a tremendously stupid takedown of Michael Beasley in the waning moments in Game 3 of Golden State’s first-round series against Houston, he was assessed a Flagrant 1 for the James retaliation, which triggered a suspension for Game 5 of the Finals.

The NBA would never be the same.

It’s not crazy to suggest that if Draymond had been on the floor in Game 5, the Warriors would have gone on to win the game and the series. The fall-out from the suspension and the fact—here we go—the Cavs came back from 3-1 down against a 73-win Warriors team and the first-ever unanimous MVP to claim the title, transforms Green’s suspension into a gigantic boulder dropped in the NBA Lake with concentric tidal waves crashing into the surrounding shore and changing the entire landscape of the league. What would have happened if he wasn’t suspended?

For starters, the Cavs don’t win the title and blow up their core nucleus.

The 2017 Voltron in the Bay doesn’t ever form if Draymond Green isn’t suspended for Game 5, and the NBA is a completely different place. For that reason alone, Green’s groin thwack will reverberate throughout history.

A second-straight loss in the Finals to the same Warriors team likely means a monumental change. Cleveland general manager David Griffin had already shown midway through the 2015-16 season he had no qualms making big moves, replacing coach David Blatt with lead assistant Tyronn Lue despite the fact the Cavs had the best record in the Eastern Conference at the time.

The Kevin Love trade whispers would have ratcheted up into a piercing howl and he’s likely not playing for the Cavaliers in 2016-17. Whoever he’s traded to, lets say Boston, is then missing whomever they gave up to get him; in Boston’s case, their 2017 draft pick and some other players to a third team who then sends their star to the Cavs. (Remember, LeBron isn’t waiting around for some rookie, even the No. 1 pick—like when Andrew Wiggins was traded for Love the fall after James arrived in Cleveland.)

Maybe Kyrie Irving—LeBron’s current mentee—gets dealt, and the Cavs bring in a pass-first point guard, the same playmaker LeBron groused about not having earlier this year.

Lue isn’t brought back as coach. Remember, in late July of 2016 Lue signed a five-year, $35 million (fifth year is team option) extension to remain Cleveland's head coach.

LeBron still opts out of his contract, but signs another two-year deal, explicitly putting more pressure on Cavs brass to give him the players he needs to really compete—luxury tax be damned—with a Warriors juggernaut who just won back-to-back titles and an NBA-record 73 regular-season games.

James also falls to 2-5 in the NBA Finals, and doesn’t leapfrog all-time greats Magic Johnson, Tim Duncan, Larry Bird, and Kobe Bryant like many felt he did after his historic comeback win over the Warriors. The Michal Jordan comparisons never really gain serious traction. People continue to say dumb things about James inability in the “clutch.” Some in Cleveland start to wonder if James will ever win a ring in Cleveland, and we spend most of the 2016-17 season wondering about his future with the Cavs.

J.R. Smith signs elsewhere in the summer of 2017 for substantially less money. Smith stupidly opted out to be an unrestricted free agent in the summer of 2015, but no one really wanted him. He then re-signed with Cleveland to a paltry-by-comparison two-year deal for $10.4 million with a player option for second year. He opted out again after winning the title and re-signed a four-year, $57-million deal in mid October of 2016. That doesn’t happen if Green isn’t suspended.

LeBron James Draymond Green Game 4 NBA Finals 2016
Image via USA Today Sports/David Richard

Perhaps the most important Cavs consequence after Green’s suspension: Matthew Dellavedova likely doesn’t get his own signature sneaker.

The biggest changes happen on the Golden State side, though, and those reverberations are felt throughout the league.

Draymond Green likely wins Finals MVP or—depending on how Game 5 goes—Stephen Curry does, cementing his status as an all-time great. Instead, many feel he’s an overrated two-time MVP who can’t hack it on the biggest stage. If Draymond wins MVP, he instantly becomes an all-time great, too. But, he probably still gets arrested over the summer for punching a Michigan State wide receiver.

Kevin Durant never goes to Golden State. He admitted as much in a Rolling Stone cover story that came out the fall after his shocking free agency announcement:

That means KD’s likely back with Russell Westbrook in Oklahoma City, and Russ doesn’t average a triple-double over the entirety of the 2016-17 season. Because of this, James Harden becomes the de facto 2017 MVP front-runner after teaming with Mike D’Antoni to bring seven seconds or less to Texas.

Affecting the 2017 MVP is one thing, but Durant’s decision to join the Warriors had much bigger ramifications. Super teams have been around in the NBA since Red Auerbach was chomping on a cigar and hoodwinking rival executives in smoke-filled back rooms, but nothing resembling the 2017 Warriors, who have two MVPs in their prime; a Defensive Player of the Year threat every season and perhaps the best defender in the space-and-pace era, and maybe the best two-way off-guard in the entire league, who is only their fourth-best player.

The 2017 Voltron in the Bay doesn’t ever form if Draymond Green isn’t suspended for Game 5, and the NBA is a completely different place. For that reason alone, Green’s groin thwack will reverberate throughout history as one of the biggest watershed moments in NBA history.

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What You Need to Know About the 25-Year-Old Douche Bro Behind Fyre Festival

For the last four or five days, your Twitter timeline has no doubt been inundated with the nightmare situation known as Fyre Festival, which went from being a $12,000-a-pop music festival for the rich, white elite to what looked like a disaster recovery situation (with actual disaster relief tents). In the fallout, it's been announced that Ja Rule and the squad behind the Fyre Festival is being hit with a $100 million class action lawsuit for their gross fuck up.

While it's been easy to chuck “Ja Rule The Scammer” tweets out there, it might be time to look at one of the other “names” on the Fyre Festival lawsuit; Billy McFarland. At 25, dude's already had his name affixed to a number of companies, primarily with an emphasis on millennials who want the finer things in life. He's one of those entrepreneurial guys who always seems to have a plan, and can apparently talk his way into a pile of money without truly delivering on his promises. A.k.a. the American way. Here's a look at Billy McFarland's pre-Fyre highlights.

McFarland's always been a businessman

When you were 13, you probably were trying to bag shorty in your math class; yung McFarland was already building his first startup, which apparently outsourced design work. A few years later, he was already dropping out of Bucknell University to found Spling, which at the time was another addition to the social networking space that secured $400,000 in funding back in 2011.

Neither of these startups caused as much havoc as his 2014 startup Magnises, which found McFarland creating his own black card (which after turned into an app, Magnises NOW) for millennials who were trying to get their IRL social status game up. It sounds dope, but apparently, you had to promise to spend $250,000 a year through the card (with a $250 annual fee) to get the Magnises perks like 24/7 concierge service, special treatment and discounts from elite brands and restaurants, and invites to exclusive events.

At the time, McFarland told Bloomberg that Magnises “enhances and really improves your everyday life in the city,” but in January of 2017, Business Insider reported that cardholders felt scammed, saying that the perks that Magnises promised (which included everything from Hamilton tickets to SR-22 plane rides to the Hamptons) were not being met. At the time, McFarland said Magnises “hit some roadblocks along the way, and that's what happens when you grow really quickly, and that's on me.” But McFarland's troubles weren't focused solely on Magnises' troubles.

McFarland trashed his $13,000-a-month West Village home

It's a given that when most young guys secure a bag, they might go ham with their earnings. According to the New York Post, in 2013 McFarland had a 500-person birthday party for photographer/socialite Patrick McMullan at his $13,750-a-month duplex on Greenwich Ave. This was one of many “blowout parties” that the landlord said caused roughly $62,000 worth of damage to the spot. At the time, the owner was looking for McFarland to pony up $100,000 in damages, but McFarland said the charges were “not valid.”

WTF is Fyre Media?

That's hard to say; according to LinkedIn, Fyre Media, Inc. was founded in 2015 is “an on demand service that makes booking the most influential celebrities, artists, athletes, models, and entertainers seamless and transparent.” They have an app, and it looks like some of their “exclusive” artists feature Fat Joe, Waka Flocka, Soulja Boy, Jim Jones, and Ja Rule. Rule, who has been listed as a co-founder of Fyre, is reportedly the “mastermind” behind the Fyre Festival, which McFarland was touting as a “luxury music festival” that was due to span two weekends (April 28-30, 2017 and May 5-7, 2017) in the Bahamas.

Aside from the musical acts, which were to include everyone from G.O.O.D. Music and Blink-182 to Disclosure and Lil Yachty, Fyre Festival was reportedly set to have $1 million worth of “hidden treasures” that would be found all over the island. It was also set to feature all kinds of rich, elite millennials attending, paying upwards of $12,000-a-pop to experience the music, art installations, talks, amazing food, and much more while chilling on the sands of Fyre Cay in the Bahamas.

As we now know, what the people got when they hit the island was the exact opposite of a “luxury music festival” experience, a day which McFarland told Rolling Stone was “definitely the toughest day” of his short, intriguing, possibly scam-filled life. It doesn't help that the festival appeared to be doomed from the start, with everything from “a rampant shark problem” and sandflies to the fucking FEMA tents and not having a stage(?!) setup revealed that Fyre was the dumpster fire it turned out to be from the rip.

McFarland also told Rolling Stone that “there will be make-up dates, May 2018 in the U.S., free for everybody who signed up for this festival,” although at this point, with his cache (and the social media shitstorm that followed the Fyre Festival) and that $100 million lawsuit looming over his head, what masochist would want to subject themselves to Fyre Festival, The Sequel?

Maybe McFarland needs to do what he does best: find new ways to rope money-hungry millennials into giving him more of their cheddar.

 

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