Shock Blake Griffin Trade; Problematic Chief Wahoo; LaVar Shades Steve Kerr | Out of Bounds

Following yesterday’s shocking mega trade, in which the Clippers sent five-time All-Star Blake Griffin to the Pistons to start a rebuild, the #OutofBounds crew weighs in on what it means for both teams and the players involved. One thing’s sure: Blake better pack some winter coats, ’cause it’s so cold in the D. (And that’s before you wonder if his model girlfriend, Kendall Jenner, will stick with him in Michigan.) Next, Gil and the gang react to the Cleveland Indians’ announcement that the team will stop using its Chief Wahoo racist caricature logo in 2019. Gil feels some kind of way and has a hot take on where PC cultural policing may go next. With NFL commissioner Roger Goodell stating he wants to change the league’s confusing and universally-hated catch rule, the team just hopes he doesn’t drop the ball…. Finally, OOB decides whether it’s fair or foul for LaVar Ball to call the Warriors’ Steve Kerr the “Milli Vanilli of Coaching” when Mr. Big Baller has coached precisely one professional game…in an exhibition tournament…in Lithuania.

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Jerry Jones Apologizes For Racially Charged Joke He Made in 2013

On Friday afternoon, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones apologized for a brief clip that was making the rounds which showed him making a racially charged joke while he appeared to be shit-faced. The footage was obtained by a media outlet called The Blast, though (honestly) it was pretty light on background or context.

According to them, Jones was at a Dallas hotel in 2013 when a Cowboys fan, who it should probably be noted is white, approached him and asked if he could offer a congrats to his new fiancée. At that point Jones looks into the camera and says “Jennifer, congratulations on the wedding. Now, you know he’s with a black girl tonight, don’t you?” The camera then cuts away to a black dude who Jerry appears to playfully shove before walking away with his coat over his shoulder.

The Blast adds that:

[W]e’re told the fan recently shared it with his group of friends because he thought the current temperature of race in the NFL and the country made Jones’ comments relevant. The friends were shocked after seeing the footage.

It was sent to The Blast because the individuals involved thought it was important for NFL fans to see. The source we spoke with said, “Fuck Jerry Jones.”

On Friday evening, through the Cowboys, Jones expressed his regret at his remarks in the footage. “That comment was inappropriate,” he said. “It's not who I am, and I'm sorry.”

As noted by the Dallas News, Hall of Fame cornerback Deion Sanders (who won a Super Bowl with the Cowboys back in the '95/'96 season) quickly came to Jones's defense. “I refuse to allow a moment to turn into a monument regarding a man I have known for 20 years, not just as an owner, but as a friend,” Prime Time said in an email. “I won't cast judgment, on one moment when a joke went south, to capture who this man represents in a lifetime commitment of love and compassion to all ethnicities.

“A joke that was intended to add humor at the request of a fan in a lighthearted moment was taken totally out of intent. I'm sorry we're in this state of mind as a country, but if you're looking for a racist, Jerry Jones is not that guy.”

This was not a particularly great Friday for the Cowboys' head honcho as, earlier in the day, a long-form story in ESPN the Magazine was published that seemed to detail a potential civil war brewing amongst the league's leadership. Jones has threatened legal action against the NFL if a contract extension for Roger Goodell is finalized. This animosity towards the commissioner reportedly stems from Goodell's handling of Ezekiel Elliott's on-and-off (now on) 6-game suspension:

Phew, lot of info there. Anyways, tons of drama in Big D. As always, really.

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Miko Grimes Talks LeBron James and Roger Goodell

On today’s episode of #OutOfBounds, special guest Miko Grimes gives us a peek inside the NFL. She doubles down on her Derek Carr controversy, combats the crew on Colin Kaepernick, and tells us what’s going on with the Bucs. The crew talks Donald Trump intervening in the UCLA case, Metta World Peace joining the Big 3, and last night’s Cavaliers vs. Knicks game: Was LeBron really being a bully? Plus, Gilbert Arenas gives viewers advice on following their dreams. 

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Mia Khalifa and Gilbert Arenas Share a Conspiracy About Ezekiel Elliott and Jerry Jones on ‘Out of Bounds’

On today’s episode of Out of Bounds, the team dives straight into a recap of last night’s Astros vs. Dodgers game. Mia is almost left speechless after finding out Roger Goodell’s salary. Gilbert Arenas calls Lonzo Ball “Fool’s Gold” and fact-checks Magic Johnson’s claim that he has 10 NBA rings. Colin Kaepernick is also expected to be signed within 10 days. The crew debates if that's really going to happen.

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Colin Kaepernick Reportedly Excluded From Meetings Between Players and NFL Owners

On October 25, ESPN reported Colin Kaepernick was expected to be invited to a forthcoming meeting between NFL owners and players scheduled for November 3. The meeting was spearheaded by Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins as part of the NFL Players Coalition’s ongoing dialogue with league owners centered on players protesting racial inequalities during the singing of the national anthem. A Slate report filed Sunday cites league emails as well as emails from Kaepernick’s attorney denying any invitation has been extended to Kaerpernick.

The chances of a potential meeting between Kaepernick and a group of NFL owners seemed slim, given that Kaep filed a collusion grievance against NFL owners for reportedly blackballing him for his political beliefs and forms of protests.

It's unclear if this is merely a matter of semantics, as Jenkins previously told TMZ that Kaepernick was invited, while Kaepernick's attorneys are maintaining that no formal invite was ever sent. You can see Jenkins remarks about Kaep being invited in the video above at the 1:46 mark.

As Kaepernick remains unsigned in favor of less accomplished quarterbacks, the perception that owners conspired to keep him out of the league has only grown in some circles. Meanwhile, an email obtained by Slate states Kaepernick’s attorney group has confirmed he “is open to participating in, and discussing the ideas he has led, at the next meeting in a meaningful way.”

The proposed meeting comes as players and ownership remain divided on the protests initiated by Kaepernick last season in response to multiple incidents of unarmed black citizens being killed by police during routine stops. The situation has been further inflamed as several NFL owners co-opted Kaepernick’s kneeling protest to use as a response to President Donald Trump saying owners should fire players engaging in such protests. 

With Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones threatening to bench any player he felt disrespected the flag, things intensified. A subsequent revelation that Houston Texans owner Bob McNair referred to players as “inmates” further angered other players.

Whether or not Kaepernick attends Tuesday’s meeting, there appears to be a clear rift between owners unhappy with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell’s handling of the protests. ESPN’s Chris Mortensen and Adam Schefter report Jones is spearheading a group of 17 owners intent on halting Goodell’s contract extension. Given how Goodell has botched the Ray Rice domestic violence incident, brokering peace between players and ownership over peaceful protests and “Deflategate,” Jones' actions aren’t particularly surprising.

Depending on how the next round of meetings plays out, there is a potential scenario where both Goodell and Kaepernick would both be out of the league within two years of the protests Kaep initiated last season.
You can read Stahl’s full report via Slate.

 

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Mia Khalifa and Gilbert Arenas Make Predictions for Hoodie Melo on ‘Out of Bounds’

On today’s episode of Out of Bounds, the crew makes predictions for this weekend’s games. Gilbert Arenas has high expectations for Carmelo Anthony this season and wants to meet Lavar Ball. NFL commissioner, Roger Goodell, continues to make vague statements regarding players taking a knee, Phoenix Suns make history taking a very big L last night, and Master P wants to start his own football league.

Also, pole dancing may become an Olympic sport. Can you guess who’s excited about that?

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You Buying This Explanation for Why Colin Kaepernick Wasn’t on That Controversial SI Cover?

Earlier this week, Sports Illustrated released one of the most controversial covers they’ve put out in a long time, even though they probably didn’t necessarily think that it would be all that controversial when they were planning it. As a reaction to all of the protests that took place last weekend after Donald Trump came out and criticized NFL players for taking a knee during the national anthem prior to games, SI put together a cover with the title, “A NATION DIVIDED, SPORTS UNITED.” It featured LeBron James, Steph Curry, Roger Goodell, Steve Kerr, Michael Bennett, and Candace Parker on it, among others.

As soon as the SI cover started circulating on social media, the first question most people had was: “WTF is Roger Goodell doing on it?” While Goodell did release a statement and—sort of—distance himself and the NFL from Trump’s anti-protest comments, he hasn’t exactly gone out of his way to support the players who have protested racial injustices and police brutality over the last year. And lest you forget, he’s kept quiet with regards to the petition that a handful of players sent him over the summer asking for the NFL to devote an entire month to social activism. So his inclusion on the SI cover was puzzling at best and downright disrespectful at worst in the eyes of many.

It also didn’t take very long for people to start asking another question once they got a glance at the cover: “Where is Colin Kaepernick?” Kaepernick is obviously the reason that this SI cover even exists in the first place. If he doesn’t take a knee during the national anthem before a preseason game last season, and if he doesn’t continue to take a knee during the national anthem before every regular-season game last year, and if he doesn’t influence other players to start taking a knee during the national anthem before games, and if he doesn’t get blackballed by the NFL in the offseason for igniting the entire #TakeAKnee movement, there is no reason for SI to do a “NATION DIVIDED, SPORTS UNITED” cover. So—where is Colin Kaepernick?

A lot of people asked this question:

Hell, even Curry, who was featured front and center on the SI cover, thought it was completely idiotic for SI to run a cover like this without giving a nod to the guy who is responsible for it existing. He went off on the cover on Wednesday and accused SI of trying to capitalize on the moment rather than actually doing something impactful for the culture.

“That was terrible,” he said. “Just kind of capitalizing on the hoopla and the media and all that nonsense. The real people that understand exactly what’s been going on and who’s really been active and vocal and truly making a difference, if you don’t have Kaepernick front and center on that, something’s wrong. It’s kind of hard to see how certain narratives take place, being prisoners of the moment.”

On Thursday, SI attempted to cover its ass by having Executive Editor Steve Cannella put together a video to explain the magazine’s original intention when they first conceived the cover. And it’s a great video—if you’re a fan of hearing someone use a bunch of buzz words that sound important. You can hear all about the “enduring message” of unity that SI was trying to get across with their cover below or here.

But what about the omission of Kaepernick? Again: Where was he? Cannella touched on that, too, and in doing so, he tried to sell everyone on the idea that Kaepernick was on the cover, even if he wasn’t actually there in the physical form.

“In some ways, even though his picture is not there, Colin Kaepernick is there; I think we all know that,” he said. “Colin Kaepernick—for lack of a better word—was looming over everything that happened this past weekend, and looms over many of the issues in society right now.”

Cannella continued by saying that SI’s intention wasn’t to ignore Kaepernick (for the record, he was mentioned at length in the accompanying cover story). Rather, the magazine wanted to shine light on some of the other professional athletes who stepped up in his absence last weekend—since, again, he has essentially been blackballed by the NFL—and continued to carry out his message.

“I thought what we were trying to capture with this cover was the way new voices emerged this weekend,” he said.

And later, he once again tried to push the idea that Kaepernick was a part of the cover even though, well, he wasn’t.

Colin Kaepernick is on that cover,” Cannella said. “Even if his face and his name aren’t there, we all know who stands behind this movement. We all know who got it started. Colin Kaepernick has many more brothers than he did a week ago.”

The problem with all of this is that by not including Kaepernick on the cover, SI—and those who are in favor of the message SI presented with its cover—are taking the focus away from what Kaepernick was protesting last season and instead turning it into a completely different issue. The “united” approach that SI took when it put its cover together is now leading to protests that really aren’t protests at all.

Kaepernick made it very clear why he was protesting shortly after his first protest went public.

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses Black people and people of color,” he said. “To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder…I have to stand up for people that are oppressed.”

So by pushing Kaepernick out of the spotlight—or in this case, off of the SI cover—you’re also pushing the message that he fought so hard to get out there last season out of the spotlight, too. And you’re replacing it with a different message that is overshadowing the one that should be front and center right now. Just like Kaepernick should be front and center on that SI cover.

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U.S. Soccer Creates Rule Mandating Players Stand for National Anthem

Colin Kaepernick became the center of controversy for his national anthem protest last season, but he was far from the only athlete leveraging pre-game festivities to protest. United States Women's National Team player Megan Rapinoe was one of many athletes to join Kaepernick last fall, causing controversy by eschewing the tradition of standing while the Star-Spangled Banner plays.

The U.S. Soccer Federation took a controversial step to combat this form of protest on Saturday. Former U.S. National Team player Stuart Holden, currently an analyst for Fox Soccer, shared this photo of a new policy added to the federation's by-laws:

This legislation bans the form of protest used by Rapinoe and Kaepernick in any game involving U.S. Soccer. Holden shared additional information as soccer fans questioned the details of the new rule, and revealed that it effectively affords the federation unlimited power to reprimand players should they break the rule.

Things appeared to be heading in this direction for a while. After the initial protest by Rapinoe in September, the U.S. Soccer Federation released a statement expressing their desire to have players stand for the anthem.

“Representing your country is a privilege and honor for any player or coach that is associated with U.S. Soccer's National Teams. Therefore, our national anthem has particular significance for U.S. Soccer,” the USSF said in their September statement. “As part of the privilege to represent your country, we have an expectation that our players and coaches will stand and honor our flag while the national anthem is played.”

Commissioners for America's major sports leagues have expressed similar thoughts, though they've differentiated themselves by voicing sympathy for an athlete's right to protest. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell played both sides of the fence when he discussed Kaepernick last September, saying the league believed “very strongly in patriotism” while acknowledging “we don't live in a perfect society.”

NBA boss Adam Silver took a similar approach before the 2016-17 season began. Discussing the matter at the annual board of governors meeting in New York, Silver told reporters, “It would be my hope that they continue to stand for the national anthem.” Silver highlighted the league's preference to take meaningful action — such as when they removed the All-Star Game from North Carolina — when faced with social issues and opportunities to make an impact.

U.S. Soccer's decision to pander exclusively to one view was not received well, and dissenters took to Twitter to express their frustration with the new rule.

Regardless of how you feel about people protesting during the national anthem, mandating what people have to do during a song meant to celebrate American freedom is pretty absurd. America is supposed to stand for the ability to do and say what you want while others do the same, and restricting that for people quite literally representing the country sends a confusing message.

This probably won't be the last you'll hear on anthem protests, even if Kaepernick himself claims he'll stand during the anthem from now on. If nothing else, this proves using the anthem as a means of protest will keep the story in the public consciousness. 

Send all complaints, compliments, and tips to sportstips@complex.com.

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DJs React To Super Bowl LI

This weekend’s Super Bowl was definitely one for the record books, with the Patriots making a stunning comeback in the 4th quarter to win the game in overtime (a first in Super Bowl history), 34-28. While many were stuck working or otherwise unable to watch the game, many prominent DJs made time to tweet about the event. Some were salty about the results, others chose to simply trivialize the event.

Whatever flavor you prefer, you’re sure to find someone who feels the same as you below.

3lau:

Marshmello:

Valentino Khan:

SNBRN:

The Chainsmokers:

Felix Cartal:

DJ Snake:

Mija:

Shaun Frank:

Diplo:

Getter:

Skrillex:

Mercer:

4B:

Dillon Francis:

TJR:

Slushii:

Carnage:

This article was first published on Your EDM.
Source: DJs React To Super Bowl LI