Joe Budden Fires Back at Chance the Rapper on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska run through the day of rap news that includes YG asking for more credit in light of Eminem going at Donald Trump. The crew also break down Rick Ross' very direct shots at Birdman over the Lil Wayne situation and debate whether Rozay is overstepping his boundaries. Budden also responds to Chance the Rapper and shares some facts for the Chicago MC. 

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Partynextdoor Arrested for Alleged Xanax and Oxycodone Possession

Partynextdoor was arrested Thursday for alleged Xanax and Oxycodone possession. The OVO signee was arrested alongside friend Jerome Nevins by New York state troopers in Niagara County early Thursday morning, WIVB reported. PND and Nevins have been charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Troopers had been called to the Lewiston-Queenston Bridge at the request of U.S. Customs and Border officials, who had reportedly found the Xanax and Oxycodone after stopping PND's tour bus for a “secondary inspection” before allowing it into the U.S.

PND allegedly had Xanax and Oxycodone on him, while Nevins only had Xanax. Both were given appearance tickets for Town of Lewiston court.

A rep for Partynextdoor did not immediately respond to Complex's request for comment.

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PND just dropped his new Seven Days project in September. The seven-track release saw guest appearances from Halsey and Rick Ross.

PND is currently on the road with Halsey as part of her Hopeless Fountain Kingdom tour, which also features support from Charli XCX. The next scheduled date is Oct. 6 at TD Garden in Boston, Massachusetts. At the time of this article's publication, PND had not issued a statement on the arrest incident.

The tour is scheduled to wrap up Nov. 22 at the Wolstein Center at CSU in Cleveland. Get the full list of dates and ticket info right here.

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O.J. Simpson Expected to Be Released From Prison Very Soon

Back in July, O.J. Simpson was granted parole during a highly-publicized hearing in Nevada. But immediately after finding out his fate, he was ordered back behind bars to await his release, which caused a lot of the buzz surrounding him to die down.

That buzz is about to get ratcheted all the way back up in the coming days, though, as it appears Simpson is on the verge of being released back into society. According to a Nevada prisons official who spoke with the Associated Press on Wednesday, Simpson could be released from the Lovelock Correctional Center as early as Monday. He has been at the facility for nine years now serving out a sentence stemming from an armed robbery conviction.

Before he’s released from custody, Simpson will actually be moved from Lovelock to High Desert State Prison just outside of Las Vegas, according to Nevada Department of Corrections spokeswoman Brooke Keast. He will then be allowed to leave that facility as a free man at some point, though prison officials are keeping the actual date and time of his release under wraps in an effort to avoid drawing media attention to the prison.

Simpson’s close friend Tom Scotto spoke with the AP and confirmed that Simpson will be released “shortly after” Oct. 1, but he declined to be any more specific than that. Once Simpson is freed, it’s unclear where he will go to live, but he's likely going to end up living somewhere in Florida.

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Watch Wyclef Jean Get Interviewed by Puppies on ‘Hounded’

It's been a long time coming, but the first episode of Hounded is finally here. When we first conceived of the show, we figured it would be easy. Puppies interviewing rappers? Who could say no?

Many months later, we have our first episode in the bag and ready for your eyes. Wyclef Jean, who is coming off some excellent collaborations with Young Thug and his twelfth studio album, is our first guest. The puppies had some twisted questions for Wyclef, but he stayed honest and survived the hounding intact. Watch the video above, and look out for new episodes every other Wednesday. 

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Playboi Carti Teases Collab Mixtape With Lil Uzi Vert

If Lil Uzi Vert wants to drop new music every single day for the foreseeable future, I would support this wholeheartedly. Luv Is Rage 2 is a triumph, and is practically begging for a relatively immediate follow-up. So why not hit us with a Playboi Carti collab project?

In a Snapchat post over the weekend, Carti appeared to confirm that something with Uzi is afoot.

uzi carti damned
Image via Snapchat

The image itself shows punk icons Captain Sensible and Dave Vanian, from the decades-strong U.K. band The Damned. Carti's caption, as XXL and others have pointed out, includes digits referencing Uzi's 1600 Philly block and Carti's 2900 Atlanta block.

Shouted fuck yeahs aside, no official announcement regarding an Uzi x Carti collab tape has been made. Still, it would be downright cruel to share a post including both the word “tape” and an image of such an iconic duo only to fall short of releasing a full-blown project together. Fingers crossed as fuck.

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Over the weekend, Uzi teased a sequel to his 2016 mixtape Lil Uzi Vert vs. the World. In an Instagram clip, Uzi teased a new track with the caption “Just A Vibe💨🚷 ….👨🏾‍🎤vs🌏2® ? 🙄.” Sadly, Marilyn Manson was not seen or heard in the clip.

 

A post shared by 16 (@liluzivert) on Sep 15, 2017 at 9:51pm PDT

Uzi's debut album, Luv Is Rage 2, made Uzi a full-fledged star of unfuckwithable stature. The album opened at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and garnered largely enthusiastic reviews from critics. If all subsequent teased projects come to pass, we'll soon be getting something with Carti, Lil Uzi Vert vs. the World 2, and a freestyle rock album that will possibly feature some input from Manson.

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Why Are Rappers Obsessed With Calling Albums “Mixtapes?”

Mixtapes have an iconic status in hip-hop. Their roots lie in the bootleg tapes of early rap groups’ rehearsals and performances, impromptu recordings that felt about as commercially viable as taking audio of your family barbecue and passing the resulting tape around the neighborhood. The medium took a big step forward when DJs Brucie B and Ron G began to elevate the form, releasing must-listen “blend tapes.” DJs were soon competing to be the first to get songs fresh out of the studio (often by less-than-honest means), or become the exclusive purveyor of the latest freestyle. From there it was off to the races.

By the early 2000s, this DJ-centric model was butting up against a more artist-centric take on the form, popularized by 50 Cent and G-Unit. In order to build a buzz, the crew (and countless other rappers in their wake) began taking instrumentals from pretty much everywhere—already-popular songs included and encouraged—and rapping over them. The result was a new kind of mixtape, that sat on the shelf at your local mixtape spot (R.I.P. to Burkina) next to the earlier tapes.

Of course, not long after, the internet came for the retail mixtape game the way it came for the rest of the music industry. Suddenly the same legally dubious mixtapes were spread to a huge audience, often for free or for the cost of your email address, through sites like DatPiff and Live Mixtapes.

Liberating mixtapes from their physical form led to an expanding of the concept as well. Suddenly artists like Drake were making fully-fledged debut statements of purpose with barely a stolen beat. Then you had The Weeknd and Chance The Rapper demonstrating that, if you had a great album to your name, released it for free and called it a mixtape you, too, could have a meteoric rise.

Today, the majority of projects that artists call mixtapes are indistinguishable from albums in nearly every regard. Original production, as opposed to freestyles over existing songs? Check. High-profile features? Check. Released by a major label? Check. Put up for sale, rather than released for free? Thanks to subscription streaming services, check, check, and double-check.

The question that remains, is why does everyone from ASAP Ferg to Drake to Chance to Dave East seem so desperate to call their albums anything but “albums?” At first glance, it seems absurd. A few weeks ago, rapper Dave East released a project on Def Jam that he called an EP. It’s 13 tracks long and runs for over 40 minutes—even by the flexible standards of the EP, that looks a lot like an album. Just last month, ASAP Ferg put out Still Striving, ostensibly a mixtape, despite the fact that it was put out by RCA and contained top-billed features by, among others, Snoop, Rick Ross, and Migos.

The problem appears to be simple: “Album” is a word that comes with heavy expectations. They’ve been around since the late 1940s, and pioneered by people like Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, and Stevie Wonder. You have a favorite album by your favorite artist. We still have all-night debates about the greatest album—whether Illmatic is better than Only Built 4 Cuban Linx or Ready to Die, or which Jay Z album is the greatest (even Hov himself has jumped into that one). Albums are important. They’re supposed to capture something about our time, about the way we live our lives. They should be statements about the artist.

“I feel like, [a mixtape] is more artistic freedom,” Ferg said in a recent interview with The Breakfast Club. “An album is so serious. With Always Strive and Prosper, my last album, it was so serious about my trials and tribulations, how I became A$AP Ferg, jobs I had before, all of that shit, but this mixtape was basically like an open door policy where I had, like, all my friends come and we just made music and had fun. It was, like, not so serious. We just wanted an excuse to party on the song.”

Dave East had similar thoughts. He told Billboard that he was saving his important stories, the ones with “super-detailed and specific moments,” for his album. “I don’t think it’s album time yet,” he said.

Mixtapes, on the other hand, are meant to be of-the-moment. And by definition, they shy away from being cohesive statements. After all, “mix” is in the very name. And the classic examples of the form contain 50-plus songs all blended together, or four dozen or so rappers freestyling, or even three guys rapping over a bunch of random shit. So calling Still Striving or If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late a “mixtape” changes (or, some might argue, lowers) expectations, both artistically and, by extension, commercially.

If an artist’s album sells poorly, speculation begins almost immediately. What happened? Did they choose the wrong single? Are they past their prime? On the other hand, sales expectations for a mixtape are lessened, because it’s not a full-on artistic statement. It’s just messing around, having some fun—even if that “fun” is promoted by the same billion-dollar corporation that releases those erstwhile (hopefully) blockbuster albums next time around.

Calling a project a “mixtape,” “EP,” “playlist,” or, hell, a “project”—anything but an “album”—sends a signal to fans and the press to bring a different set of expectations, and to lower the pressure a little bit. No wonder it’s such a common move. With such an easy out available, it’s a wonder people release albums at all.

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The Who’s Who Of SoundCloud Rap

If a rapper without “lil” in their name drops a mixtape on SoundCloud and no one presses play, does it make a sound? That’s what it feels like keeping up with the massive onslaught of buzzing rappers, new mixtapes, and subgenres on top of microgenres in 2017.

Even with the continued relevance of the streaming service in hip-hop, SoundCloud has weathered a tough year. In early July, the streaming platform laid off 173 employees amid rumors the company only had enough capital to make it to the end of 2017. Chance the Rapper claimed he was going to save the day. Independent musicians panicked about what this meant for the future of distributing their music. Ultimately, SoundCloud announced it is here to stay, whatever that means.

On the intro to Lil Uzi Vert’s new album, Luv Is Rage 2, the Philadelphia rapper sent subliminals to a plethora of unnamed targets. The fact the diss could be referencing almost any SoundCloud rapper speaks to the nature of the platform and how fast influence disseminates. “Yes, I'm the one that really started all this/And you know I changed a lot of you niggas/In a matter of months, I raised a lot of you niggas,” raps Uzi on “Two®.”

Uzi isn’t wrong. SoundCloud is home to an entire nation of rappers with colored dreads, melodies inspired by 2000s emo and pop punk, and the latest mutations on Atlanta’s trap. A lot of the music is groundbreaking, much of it is not. What it means to be a SoundCloud rapper in 2017, is shifting and the ecosystem is rapidly changing. The term “SoundCloud Rap” has become a dismissive descriptor in the same way “Mumble Rap” has.

Despite this, the SoundCloud ecosystem is shifting. The platform is still massively influential, but Spotify with Rap Caviar and Apple with The A-List: Hip-Hop are leading the curated playlist era. Rappers that built their fan bases on SoundCloud, have largely started to phase out of the system that birthed them. Lil Uzi Vert is well on his way to having the number one album in the country. Problematic rappers like XXXTentacion are transitioning from millions of plays on SoundCloud to selling a rumored 65-70k in their first week. Princess Nokia is getting features in Vogue, performing to adoring fans at Afropunk, and re-releasing 2016’s 1992, after scrubbing it from SoundCloud. If anything SoundCloud’s biggest problem is keeping the stars they help birth from becoming more fuel to the engines of their competitors.

Below are some of the fastest rising artists currently dominating SoundCloud, many of whom are already on the cusp of jumping over the orange and white cloud.


  • Trippie Redd

    Trippie Redd sounds like pain. The 18-year-old, Canton, Ohio is, creatively, an extension of the melodic trap sensibility that Atlanta artists like Future and Young Thug have been perfecting for years. Trippie hails from the same city as Marilyn Manson, and his dark soundscapes seem plucked from similar hell pits. However, what separates Redd is his inimitable voice. The rapper’s reverb soaked vocals, warble, distort, and cascade over tracks. Seemingly endlessly versatile, he sometimes seems to do it all within the same moment.

    His biggest song to date is the devastating, psychedelic, “Love Scars.” “You used to say you in love/I used to say that shit back/Taking that shit from the heart/Now look where the fuck where we at,” Trippie raps over the Elliot Trent-produced fever dream. Trippie tends to stretch out the boundaries of his syllables like a never-ending echo, an effect that is exciting and haunting at the same time.

    The closest comparison lobbed at Trippie is undoubtedly Lil Uzi Vert. To be fair, Trippie’s vocals can dip into some of the same territory as Vert's staked out for himself. Regardless, it's unfair to lump the two together considering how raw and unrestrained Redd is willing to get with his performances.


  • Kodie Shane

    Kodie Shane is easily the most talented member of Lil Yachty’s Sailing Team. Her ear for melodies and talent to execute them separates her from most rappers in her weight class. Kodie is like a sentient piece of bubblegum on songs like “Hold Up”— which features Lil Uzi Vert and Lil Yachty. Where her male counterparts' processed vocals can often grate on one’s ears, Shane has a knack for making her performances cut through to your heart. In an interview with Complex News, Kodie discusses her penchant to compete with male artists. “I definitely hope that I’m inspiring a lot of different female artists to run with the boys,” says Shane. “I say that’s what I’m doing. I run with the boys.”

    Sad” is likely the best example of her displaying that mindset. If you were listening without knowing any of the rappers on the track, Shane stands out as the bigger star, despite the fact that she shares the bill with her Sailing Team leader Lil Yachty. A lyric like “I just want to be sad” is genius in its simplicity, and across the song she keeps up the penchant for directedness.

    Don’t sleep on Shane’s latest EP, Back From the Future. Throw on “Indecisive,” and you’ll be singing, “I feel like Cam’ron back in 06,” for the rest of 2017.


  • Lil Peep

    In 2007, My Chemical Romance lead singer Gerard Way released The Umbrella Academy. The comic book was illustrated by Gabriel Bá, and re-wrote everything my 14-year-old brain thought about comics. It was inventive, experimental, and not easily classified.

    Listening to Lil Peep reminds me of reading The Umbrella Academy. That isn’t to say his music is good, but it's often enthralling. Peep is an emo artist with trap influences. Lyrics on his biggest songs “Gym Class,” read as if they belong in a big budget reboot of a John Hughes movie. “Now I’m faded on my own in my bedroom/Now I’m lookin' at my phone should I text you?/I don't wanna sext you, I don't wanna bless you/Baby I'm a priest in the underworld, Guess who,” raps Peep over a plodding and atmospheric Brobak-produced song.

    In early August, Peep released his debut album, Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 1. Songs like “Better Off (Dying)” and “Save That Shit” confirmed what many had long suspected: Peep’s use of melody was pushing him farther into the rock genre and farther from the rapping that got him here. Such is the life of a white rapper in 2017.


  • Rico Nasty

    If the world is fair and just place (it isn't), the success of Cardi B and her song “Bodak Yellow” will spark a trend. The number 3 song in the country didn’t have to go pop to pop. Rico Nasty doesn’t make music like Cardi, but she does have the same sense of joyful idiosyncrasy, and force of personality could set her apart from the pack.

    Most know the DMV rapper from her song “Hey Arnold,” which Lil Yachty would inevitably jump on after its release. But her music is so much more than that. Crisp and concise, Tales of Tacobella is one of the best projects of 2017. “Block List” is Rico’s catchiest and most undeniable song to date. “Do What It Do” is my personal favorite. However, her latest song Poppin’” is a blistering diss supposedly aimed at another female rapper, Bali Baby. “I'm a poppin' ass bitch let me remind ya/Don't hide, I can always come and find ya/Ain't no bitch in me bitch, come proper,” spits Rico over a stuttering, majestic beat. With the right push, the song and the story behind it have the potential to go viral.


  • Lil Pump

    Lil Pump must be great at mad libs. The secret to the South Florida rapper’s undeniable formula is simple: Pick a name out of a hat, compare said name to how rich and successful you are, and rap it over a booming beat. Here is the chorus to Lil Pump’s “D Rose,” “100 on my wrist, 80 on my wrist/D Rose, D Rose, D Rose, D Rose.” For comparison here is the hook to the song “Boss,” “Yeah, I came in with the sauce, ooh/Yeah, I came in with a saw, ooh/Bitch, I flex, Rick Ross, yeah/Bitch, I flex, Rick Ross, yeah.” On “Lil Pump” he flips the script, monotonously saying his name over and over again like a mystic chant.

    It is hard to tell how serious the pink and blonde-dreaded rapper is on any given song. This is potentially why people love and hate Pump in equal measure. The Florida teen isn’t re-inventing the rap wheel, but to expect him to is missing the point. He’s mastered the art of repetition and name association, and is undeniably charismatic on the mic. For now, that is enough for most.


  • Asian Doll

    If there was a rapper I wouldn’t cross based solely off their delivery it would be Asian Doll. “Real Bitch Anthem” is almost four minutes of Doll aggressively throwing barbs, shade, and lyrical projectiles in every direction. Want to feel like a broke boy by association? Let some of Doll’s iciest daggers slit your soul. “You ain't a real nigga stunting in your homies shoes/You got a penthouse, with bout six dudes/All your crack cards scamming to you out the loot,” spits Doll like she wants to ensure you’ll never want to get on her bad side.

    Asian Doll’s biggest song to date is “Poppin,” featuring PnB Rock and produced by frequent Lil Uzi Vert collaborator Maaly Raw. The most amazing part of the song is Doll’s one and only verse. Even when her voice is overtly processed her lyrical hostility still bleeds through.


  • Tay-K

    It's hard to tell if Tay-K is a SoundCloud rapper in the traditional sense, or if the viral nature of his existence has been a boon across anything and everything associated with his name. The 17-year-old Texas rapper is infamous for his song “The Race,” and the backstory that propelled it to one of the most intriguing, but ultimately sad songs of the year.

    According to the New York Times Tay-K has, “been charged, along with six others, in connection with a home invasion that left a 21-year-old man dead in July 2016, when Tay-K was 16; Tay-K had been released from custody pending the hearing and was wearing an ankle monitor.” Tay-K would end up cutting off his ankle bracelet and going on the run after being faced with the threat of being tried as an adult on capital murder charges. His hit song, “The Race,” dropped the same day he was apprehended in Elizabeth, NJ. His legendary status was solidified.

    “The Race” is currently number 12 on the SoundCloud Top 50, number 52 on the Billboard Hot 100, and home to over 30 million views on YouTube. Remixes have flooded SoundCloud.

    The whirlwind surrounding Tay-K obscures the fact that he has a knack for the type of aggressive songs that launched Chief Keef into the national consciousness. Songs like “Mega Man” and “Murder She Wrote” have the same intangible quality that makes “The Race,” so enthralling. If Tay-K can avoid jail time, he will have a promising rap career ahead of him.


  • Ski Mask The Slump God

    Ski Mask the Slump God has the number 2 song on the SoundCloud Top 50. That in and of itself isn’t surprising. The majority of the Ski Mask’s songs have millions of plays. However, Ski deciding to rip the Timbaland-produced instrumental for the 1999 Missy Elliot song, “She’s a Bitch,” and turn it into a hit of his own is a stroke of bizarre genius.

    To say Ski demolished the beat would be a massive understatement.“Naruto nine-tailed fox coat fur/I feel like a Gucci ad-lib, burr!/Colder than Coca-Cola mascot, polar bear,” is one of the coldest openings to a verse in recent memory. The reception to the track was so positive, Missy herself sent out a tweet. “Oh he rode the heck out of this Fiyah,” wrote Missy with a deluge of fire emojis.

    Write off Ski as just another “SoundCloud Rapper” at your own peril. His rapid fire flow on songs like, “Take a Step Back,” is reminiscent of a Busta Rhymes a few dimensions removed from our earthly plane. We can only hope that tracks like the “Get Your Freak On”-sampling, A$AP Ferg assisted-“ILoveYourAuntie” on deck will get Timbaland to bless Ski Mask by producing an entire project.


  • Molly Brazy

    Spend enough time listening to female rappers on SoundCloud and a common trend emerges. While their male counterparts are obsessed with emulating the freewheeling experimentation of modern Atlanta, women on the streaming platform are generally more concerned with proving their skills lyrically. Molly Brazy is a Detroit rapper with a rapid, violent flow that never strays far from abrasive.

    Her song “Outro,” is as combative as it is infectious. There is no singing, no vocal manipulation, or intergalactic beats. Instead, Brazy rides over the Bay Area-influenced instrumental, spitting lines like, “Riding in the foreign say he like the way I snap it/Bitches panic when they see me load the semi automatic.”


  • Smokepurpp

    It’s hard to pinpoint what type of rapper Smokepurpp wants to be. If there was a game of “build-a-SoundCloud-rapper,” the 19-year-old Florida would already possess the propensity for catchy adlibs of Playboi Cardi and the auto-tune gargling of Lil Yachty. “To the Moon” isn’t his biggest song, but it easily one of his most creatively expansive. Nightmarish and psychedelic, it is what I imagine Kid Cudi’s 2008 song “Man on the Moon” would sound like if it was made in 2017.

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Watch Drake Recreate ‘Views’ Cover by Performing on Replica CN Tower at Eighth Annual OVO Fest

Drake and company took to Toronto tonight to put on their eighth annual OVO Fest. The show took place in Toronto and saw performances from Partynextdoor, Majid Jordan, Roy Woods, Dvsn, and the anointed one himself, the ruler of the dominion known as the 6ix, Drake. OVO boss Drizzy also took the opportunity to announce that he is at work on a new album. The project will most likely be out next year. 

In the eight years of OVO fest, there have been plenty of surprise guests. Back in 2011, Drake brought out the legend known as Stevie Wonder. The superstar performed a medley of “I Wish,” “Ribbon in the Sky,” “Signed, Sealed, Delivered,” and “Superstitious.” Rick Ross and the Weeknd also performed at the show that year.

In 2014  Lauryn Hill blessed the stage to perform her songs “Ready or Not” and “Lost Ones” and was joined by Drake to perform “Doo Wop” and “Draft Day.” Kanye West was in attendance in 2013 to perform “New Slaves” and “All of the Lights.” 

At the first annual OVO Fest, back in 2010, Drake had Eminem and Jay Z come out. 

For the latest OVO fest, which took place on August 7 at the Budweiser Stage in Toronto, Drake did it big by performing atop a replica of Toronto's famous CN Tower, impressively recreating the cover of his album Views. Drizzy also brought out Cardi B, who performed her hit track “Bodak Yellow.” Drake also had previous nemesis Tory Lanez come out to perform his “Controlla” remix. ​Oh, and if that wasn't enough Migos, Playboi Carti, Travis Scott, French Montana, The Weeknd, Nelly, and Rae Sremmurd all hit the stage at the star studded show. 

Check out some clips from the eighth annual OVO fest below. 

 

$$ so many stars ☄️⭐️☄️$$

A post shared by stewie (@stewlittle_30) on Aug 7, 2017 at 6:38pm PDT

 

$$ 6 GOD 🙏🏾$$

A post shared by stewie (@stewlittle_30) on Aug 7, 2017 at 6:29pm PDT

 

DRAKE BROUGHT OUT CARDI B IM NOT OKAY MY SOUL HAS LEFT MY BODY @champagnepapi @iamcardib #OVOFEST

A post shared by Aubzie ⁶🙏🏽 (@_ovo_drake_xo) on Aug 7, 2017 at 6:53pm PDT

 

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Big Sean Previewed a New Travis Scott Collab and It Sounds Like a Banger

Lollapalooza 2017 wrapped up Sunday night in Chicago's Grant Park, capping off a four-day marathon of memorable performances. Ahead of Justice's closing set on the Bud Light stage Sunday night, Big Sean hit his Mike Carson-designed stage for an energetic cruise through his increasingly stacked catalog.

 

Set design on fleek, @mikecarson not just my brudda, he da best! #92 #Don

A post shared by BIGSEAN (@bigsean) on Aug 6, 2017 at 9:10pm PDT

At one point during his set, Sean gifted the Lolla crowd with a tease of a new collaboration with Travis Scott:

The track is rumored to feature production by Metro Boomin. Sean also referenced the track's possible title—”We Go Legend”—in an Instagram post on Monday:

 

We go Legend 🔥🔥🔥

A post shared by BIGSEAN (@bigsean) on Aug 7, 2017 at 8:50am PDT

Sean and Scott last appeared together on DJ Khaled's Grateful single “On Everything” alongside Rick Ross.

Sean released his biggest album yet, I Decided, back in February. The album has maintained some serious legs on the charts thanks to a marathon of singles and videos, including “Sacrifices” featuring Migos. The “Sacrifices” video was first released as a gift to fans who made a physical album purchase, with Sean informing them in May that they had been given access to an app that allowed them to get a look at the video before anyone else. Shortly after, the video was made available on YouTube.

This year's Lollapalooza lineup also featured Chance the Rapper, Run the Jewels, Lorde, Blink-182, Lil Yachty, 21 Savage, Majid Jordan, Arcade Fire, Charli XCX, Joey Badass, Rae Sremmurd, and so many more. Catch pro-shot footage of Majid Jordan performing “Her” and Wiz Khalifa running through “Young Wild and Free” below.

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