Apple Music’s Hip-Hop Programming Head Carl Chery Moves to Spotify

The streaming world has been shaken-up a lot over the course of the last few years, especially as it becomes the predominant way to listen to and discover new music. This year alone has already seen a few big players joining and leaving both record labels and streaming giants for new positions as the industry gets increasingly competitive. Now Variety reports that head of artist curation for hip-hop and R&B programming at Apple Music, Carl Chery, will be leaving the company for a new role at competitor Spotify.

Chery joined the company all the way back in 2014 as part of Apple's acquisition of Beats By Dre/Beats Music, but now it's expected he'll fill the hole former RapCaviar curator Tuma Basa left when he headed to YouTube in February. As Variety points out, Chery previously developed Apple Music's hugely popular A-List: Hip-Hop and A-List: R&B playlists, and he was also responsible for helping secure Chance The Rapper's Coloring Book as an Apple Music exclusive. 

Carl Chery has also played a big part in helping launch the careers of numerous popular artists, including Post Malone, Cardi B, and Daniel Caesar among others.

With Spotify recently going public with an estimated value of almost $30 billion dollars on its opening day of NYSE trading, he couldn't've picked a better time to join the company. 

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Walmart Yodeling Boy Mason Ramsey Will Perform at Coachella

Beyoncé, The Weeknd, Eminem, Cardi B, and more are set to take the stage at Coachella. But the audience will be in for a rare performance—the yodeling boy.

Earlier this month, a video of 11-year-old Mason Ramsey went viral as he sang his heart out to Hank Williams' “Lovesick Blues” complete with the yodeling parts, inside of a Walmart. Ramsey was also sporting a bow-tie and cowboy boots, adding to the out-of-the-box clip.

Since then, he's been on Ellen (of course he was), and even played a show in a Wal-Mart parking lot that was live-streamed on Facebook. But now, TMZ reports he's going to take on one of the biggest stages ever at the Southern California music festival. But that's not all. It seems he's become a hot commodity on the scene as other musicians are trying to book him to perform with them. That number of musicians includes Post Malone, who reportedly wanted to collab with Ramsey on stage on Saturday night. Unfortunately, Ramsey's scheduled is stacked, and he already had another performance set with Grand Ole Opry. Malone is set to perform during Coachella's second weekend as well though so it could still happen. But we'd be really interested in a Cardi B/Yodel boy performance. Between Cardi's unique noises and Ramsey's yodeling, it would be…interesting, to say the least.

But first up, Ramsey is slated to bring his yodeling skills to a set with Chicago DJ, Whethan, at the Sahara tent later today. It can be live-streamed here.

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Here’s Why 21 Savage Is No Longer Wearing Jewelry

Jewelry will no longer be a part of the 21 Savage aesthetic.

In a recent tweet, Stone Mound Meezy—21's manager—said the “Rockstar” chart-topper “no longer wears jewelry.” Instead, Meezy said, 21 wants to make things like buying houses and investing in businesses “cool” for young artists to do.

These tweeted goals arrive just after 21 announced a joint tour with his “Rockstar” collaborator Post Malone. The tour, kicking off April 26 in Portland, boasts support from SOB x RBE and Paris on select dates. Tickets are now available.

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Since dropping Issa Album and his Offset x Metro Boomin collab Without Warning in 2017, 21 has appeared on tracks by Big Sean, Rich Brian, Casino, and more. In December, he linked up with Cardi B for “Bartier Cardi,” which eventually peaked at No. 14 on the Billboard Hot 100 earlier this year. Speaking on his successes with Rolling Stone last year, 21 recalled how he reacted when Epic Records realized they had made one hell of a mistake by not signing him sooner. “When I came into the [Epic] office [the second time] I'm like, 'Yo, you gotta pay an extra fee cause you ain't sign me in the beginning,'” he said.​

Earlier this month, 21 was the inspiration behind Amber Rose's Valentine’s Day-themed Spotify playlist. The mix includes theme-appropriate tracks from Pharrell Williams, Frank Ocean, Jill Scott, Teddy Pendergrass, and more.

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Rich Brian Experiences Peak Bromance While Eating Spicy Wings | Hot Ones

Rap phenom Rich Brian just became the first Asian artist to ever reach #1 on the iTunes Hip Hop Chart with his debut album, “Amen.” But how is he with hot food? Find out as Indonesian-born, Internet-bred emcee goes wing for wing with Sean Evans in the Hot Ones terror dome. As he faces down sauces like Extreme Karma and Da Bomb, Brian discusses touring with Joji, his bromance with Post Malone, and the finer points of fanny-pack fashion.

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Jay Z & SZA Grammy Snubs?, Migos Album Reactions, Meek Mill Case Update | Everyday Struggle

On today’s #EverydayStruggle, DJ Akademiks, Nadeska, and STAR broke down their reactions to the Grammys and debated about whether or not SZA was snubbed for “Best New Artist.” They also dive into whether or not Jay Z should have taken home some awards before breaking down Post Malone’s comments about struggling as a white rapper. To wrap the show, the crew broke down Migos’ new album and debated about whether or not they delivered. 

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Post Malone Claims It’s a Struggle Being a White Rapper

It’s no secret Post Malone and hip-hop have a turbulent relationship. Malone clings to hip-hop as his main source of popularity and income, while turning his back on it in lyrics, interviews, and on Twitter. It's a paradoxical, but not historically uncommon, approach for Post as a white artist to pick and choose what he likes without caring where it came from. In an apologetic new given the opportunity to claim/denounce a genre that he’s appropriated without fully paying proper respect.

Writer Bijan Stephen breaks down Malone’s sound as a genre-bending melange of emo, rock, pop, hip-hop, and country, comparing him to the likes of Lil Peep and Lil Uzi Vert—other rappers bringing a darker, rockier sound to the rap game. “It should just be music, you know?” Post says as he throws back an unknown number of Bud Light during the interview. (Within hours of publication, the article had been edited to read “beers.”) “Because I’ve met so many people that’ll say, ‘I listen to everything except for this, or this,’ you know? And I think that’s stupid. If you like it, you should listen to it.”

While we can spend all day dissecting the exact influences on Post’s style, it’s misleading to say that he profits directly off of anything but presenting himself as a hip-hop artist. He tried to be in a heavy metal band, remember? Didn’t work out. “Rockstar” made it to No. 1 through the help of places like Spotify’s influential Rap Caviar playlist and 21 Savage’s established rap fan base. Stoney keeps distancing himself from that reality, even saying “If you’re looking for lyrics, if you’re looking to cry, if you’re looking to think about life, don’t listen to hip-hop,” in one interview.

It’s almost as if Post is running away from hip-hop, and it just won’t leave him alone! But that’s of course not the case. Post returns again and again, because hip-hop is the most popular genre in the country right now—and, as I mentioned, the metal band didn’t exactly top the charts.

“I definitely feel like there’s a struggle being a white rapper. But I don’t want to be a rapper. I just want to be a person that makes music,” he says to GQ. “I make music that I like and I think that kicks ass, that I think the people who fuck with me as a person and as an artist will like.”

The interviewer then proceeds to spoon-feed Post a few race-related questions to try and see if the rapper—I’m sorry, musician—addresses any of his previous problematic statements.

Do you see that it’s political to be a black rapper?

“Yeah, yeah!” he says. “I mean…shit.”

And you also recognize that there are separate struggles that go along with race, right?

“Yeah,” he says, “of course.”

The writer seems satisfied with these responses, but those half-assed answers don’t really reveal anything we didn’t already know. Post Malone wants all the access and success of being a rapper without accepting his privilege, and will use tactical non-answers to keep it. He also drinks a lot of Bud Light.

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Post Malone: ‘I Still Only Have 1 Good Song’

Post Malone is the latest artist to be interviewed by Nardwuar. It took place in Toronto, Canada, where the pair talked about Post’s love for Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, and much more.

 

At the 11:55 mark, Post talks about his early days in his career, and specifically performing to crowds with only a few songs to his name. In 2015, Post’s buzz grew off SoundCloud hits such as “White Iverson,” “Too Young,” “Tear$,” and “What’s Up.” But according to him, his one good song (even to this day) is “White Iverson.”

Nardwuar: Have you ever done “White Iverson” twice?

Post Malone: I sure have. I used to get a lot of shit for it. [Laughs] You gotta understand I had like three songs out. I only had one good song. I still only have one good song, but I had to do it first and I had to do it last ‘cause no one knew who the hell I was.

It is funny Post says this about his own body of work. Since “White Iverson,” he’s had multiple platinum-selling singles: “Déjà vu” with Justin Bieber, “Congratulations” with Quavo, and his new single “Rockstar” featuring 21 Savage that spent four weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

His debut album, Stoney, is certified double platinum while fans are anticipating the release of Beerbongs & Bentleys slated for sometime next year.

But you’re your own worst critic, so maybe he has a point. You can watch the full interview above.

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Post Malone Apologizes for Delay In New Album Release

Post Malone fans will have to wait a “little” longer to hear Beerbongs & Bentleys.

In mid-November, the 22-year-old “Congratulations” artist suggested his sophomore album would finally arrive this week. This was good news for fans, as the project was initially expected to drop back in June.

“I'm gonna finish it this week, he told the H3 Podcast weeks ago. “It will be out in December. December 1 at midnight.”

It’s now Dec. 2, and Beerbongs & Bentleys is nowhere to be found.

Malone apologized for the delay on social media, claiming he was still working his ass off to “make the best fucking album ever.”

Stay tuned for updates on the project’s release.

Malone has received a lot of heat in recent weeks, primarily for his controversial comments on hip-hop. The rapper recently told Poland’s Newonce that audiences should stay away from genre if they’re looking for something meaningful. He attempted to clarify his comments following the backlash; however, some people weren't willing to let it slide. 

“Post Malone, I'm done giving you passes bro,” Hot 97's Peter Rosenberg said this week. “You got a pass for braids, which is not common. You got a pass for the n-word thing that happened on Snapchat… So, either leave hip-hop and go make music in another genre, or start showing respect for hip-hop.”

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21 Savage Calls Out ‘OG Rappers’ Criticizing the New Generation

21 Savage has something to say to anyone who spends their time criticizing younger artists. In a note shared to Twitter Tuesday afternoon, 21—who popped up on the “Krippy Kush” remix with Nicki Minaj just hours earlier—wondered aloud why “OG rappers” are judging the new wave and its subject matter instead of celebrating the fact that rap is now widely recognized as the music industry's dominant genre.

“Why do so many of these 'Og Rappers' judge the new generation?” 21 said. “They say we make drug user music like making drug selling music is better what's the difference? What about the fact that rap is the number one genre of music right now none of y'all acknowledge that [sic].”

21 also urged these critics to stop using younger artists as “the scapegoat,” as their music is merely “a reflection of what's going in our community.”

Read 21's full note below.

Though Savage didn't name anyone in particular, his words may have in part been a response to veteran rapper Skillz, who shared this on Twitter a few days ago:

Annoyingly, every genre of music goes through this cycle. A few loud voices of the old guard, perhaps feeling threatened by the rise of young talent whose music they aren't allowing themselves to understand out of spite, lament the supposed ending of some golden era. Meanwhile, younger listeners and artists argue they are in the middle of a golden era of their own. Then those younger listeners and artists get older, and inevitably a few of them will make the same mistakes as the old guard they railed so hard against years before. The key is to avoid all of that nonsense by keeping your mind open to new sounds.

Catch 21 Savage delivering something fresh on the Numb the Pain Tour, which next hits the Joy Theater in New Orleans Nov. 21. 

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Ghostwriting Stories, How Artists Pick Singles, Post Malone Hip-Hop Comments | Everyday Struggle

On today’s #EverydayStruggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska run through some hip-hop news, including Post Malone’s recent comments on hip-hop not making a real connection for listeners, and Cardi B feeling the pressure. The crew also reacted to the news that Jay Z wrote Snoop Dogg’s verse on “Still Dre” before divining into a convo about how artists and labels pick singles for projects. 

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