Watch Mirror Gazer’s Colorful “On My Way” Video, Shot on 16mm Film

A move from Portland, OR to New York helped re-inspire Mirror Gazer, and he's writing songs that are more emotional and personal than ever. “On My Way” is his first official release in five years, and he explained, “To me the song is about a person hoping a relationship will work, but that person is holding back out of fear of being hurt.”

“On My Way” was his first single in five years and Mirror Gazer directed and edited the video, which is shot on Super 16mm film, himself too. The timeless, rock and alternative-inspired track is out now via Fresh Selects. Purchase here and look out for remixes dropping in January. Learn more about Mirror Gazer here.

See more premieres on Pigeons & Planes' YouTube here.

More from Complex

Wiz Khalifa on Cam’ron, Cigarettes, and ‘Laugh Now, Fly Later’

Wiz Khalifa's new project Laugh Now, Fly Later dropped earlier this month, and he came by for a new episode of Trending Topics to speak about his favorite rapper in the world (Cam'ron), why people should smoke weed instead of cigarettes, and his close relationship with Curren$y.

Having come up during the peak of the blog era, Wiz also took a moment to share his thoughts on the current relevance of blogs: “I just think blogs definitely still matter as much as they did before, I just think the content is different. People have come up so many other ways, like SoundCloud. And now if you, like, piss on your homeboy while he's sleeping, you'll get popular on Instagram.”

During his visit, Khalifa also had a chance to make good on his promise (eight years later) to reward every blog and DJ for their support of Burn After Rolling with white papers:

 

8 years later, @wizkhalifa delivers. Thank u Wiz

A post shared by Pigeons & Planes (@pigsandplans) on Nov 16, 2017 at 4:43pm PST

Thanks, Wiz.

You can watch the episode above and hear his new project Laugh Now, Fly Later below.

More from Complex

Creek Boyz Are Going Global With Positivity, Unity, and the Contagious Hit “With My Team”

In today's hip-hop, the group mentality has become almost non-existent amongst artists and fans alike. Most groups today center around one star act and when a group manages to hold it together like the Migos, we as fans encourage them to break apart and release solo work. Groups like Wu-Tang Clan, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, and A Tribe Called Quest all had their rough patches, but they all maintained a balance and there were rarely points where one member completely separated himself from the group to a point of no return. Baltimore rap group Creek Boyz plan to bring the concept of unity back to the forefront of hip-hop.

Earlier this year, Turk P. Diddy, Fedi Mula, J. Reezy, and ETS Breeze built a huge buzz with their single, “With My Team.” The song took off online and was actually was the first song the four members ever recorded together as a unit. They've formed an unbreakable bond since then, both on and off-record, to the point where they even stack their vocals in the studio and record at the same time, in the same booth. Today, the group is here with a revamped video for their breakout hit and also spoke to us about their impact and the importance of teamwork.

How did you all come together?

Turk P. Diddy: The music, that's what brought us together initially. I met Fetty back in middle school. We consider each other brothers from another mother, for real. That's what we call each other.

How long have you guys been making music together?

Fedi Mula: I'd say about a year and a half but we didn't all really come together as one at first. It was more like J Reezy and Breeze had their thing and me and Turk had our thing and then we just brought it all together and named it Creek Boyz.

When did you bring it together, on “With My Team?”

All: Yessir!

Who influenced you guys growing up? I saw you guys mention Gucci Mane, Styles P, and The Lox before.

Turk: My parents really influenced me, because of the struggles I had to go through at home. My grandmother, she's the one that had passed away, she influenced me. She was the first person in my family to actually tell me to pursue this career even when everybody else in the family was like, “Nah, don't be a rapper, be something else.” Family influenced us.

J. Reezy: Musical influences would have to be Yo Gotti, Gucci Mane, Three 6 Mafia.

Turk: J Cole, Fab, Nas, and Biggie. That's all I'm here for, that's all of my music, fam.

Breeze: My big brother, my brother played the drums, we were always musically inclined. We used to go to church and stuff like that. So we kind of carried that over to the street and eventually we mixed everything. Growing up I listened to Dru Hill, Al Green, Teddy Pendergrass—that's where we get the old school from.

Fedi: I grew up with music, born into the family of it. Everybody, like my whole family was trying to do music at one point. So, it just was what it was. It was a natural attraction. By the time I got eight, nine years old, I sung in my elementary choir, Woodland Elementary with Ms. Otis. I got kicked out two years later, so I started rapping. My older brother did everything, he was always making beats on Fruity Loops. He played a big influence. As far as musical influences, Michael Jackson, number one, 2Pac, number two, and then I like all the groups going nuts like the Temptations.

You guys shout out kids a lot in your interviews and stuff, do you think that most of your fans are younger?

Turk: That's what I see, yeah.

Fedi: We’re influencing all of the young'uns coming up right now.

Does that affect the kind of music that you guys record?  

Turk: Yeah, we got to make sure stuff is kid-friendly, PG-13 type of lyrics. I mean, I still go crazy, but I try not to. You gotta keep pushing it in a different way.

So no more “Keep Them Freaks Out.”

Turk: Let 'em keep them freaks out the house. [LaughsNah, you're gonna still get that, still get that aesthetic!

The whole world was built on teamwork, but everybody says they did it by themselves.

How do you guys pick who's gonna be on each song? Is it open to everybody or do you work together separately and then come together with different songs?

Breeze: Every song and everything we do usually comes natural. So if one of us comes up with a hook or a song, we all try and flow but some people it comes naturally in certain types of songs. We don't force nothing, everything we do comes genuinely. Usually we vibe separately and then come to the studio, bring it all together, and that's what makes the masterpiece.

Whose idea was it to stack vocals like that and have all four of you singing into the microphone at the same time?

Fedi: Our producer. That's our style, that's our new genre of music.

How have you guys adjusted to the music industry? Have you gotten to meet any people involved in the industry, like other rappers and stuff like that?

Turk: Fetty Wap, Trey Songz, Gotti. A couple other artists on 300 like Tee Grizzley, TK Kravitz.

Fedi: The music industry just has encouraged us to all be on the same page so we can show them all that this team is really a team.

Turk: None of that funny stuff. Show them the unity in the group.

What’s in store for 2018?

J. Reezy: Albums, solo projects, tour, merch, awards, more money. [Laughs] That’s just me brainstorming. I’m gonna keep it 100 with you, where we’re from, I’d feel lucky to be alive next year. Anything could happen. Our main focus is to get to 2018.

How important is it that you have such a strong following amongst kids in your environment, knowing the potential dangers both you and them face on a day-to-day basis?

Fedi: It’s a huge impact. Especially just being able to work together as a team. The whole world was built on teamwork, but everybody says they did it by themselves.

Breeze: I agree.

Turk: Let me give you a quick story. A little boy was rapping to me, trying to freestyle, but the only thing he could rap about was killing and shooting. So I asked him why and he said, “I only rap about it because everyone else talks about it.”

So what we’re doing right now is setting a positive example. There’s a lot of tension going on in our city. The power that we have is the power to change these kids’ perceptions on life. Instead of being a drug dealer you can be a doctor, a nurse, a ball player… or a rapper!

 

A post shared by Pigeons & Planes (@pigsandplans) on Nov 14, 2017 at 8:27am PST

More from Complex

Ski Mask The Slump God: The ComplexCon Interview

Ski Mask The Slump God killed it on the Pigeons & Planes stage at ComplexCon, and after the show he stopped by for an interview. Ski Mask shared his thoughts on the “SoundCloud rapper” label, talked about what it's like working with legends like Timbaland and Busta Rhymes, and explained why he doesn't have a bad thing to say about major labels.

Ski Mask has come a long way in the last year, but don't expect him to be slowing down any time soon. Check out the interview above, and watch Ski Mask The Slump God's episode of Hounded below.

More from Complex

New Yorkers React to Jaden Smith’s Music and Tweets

ComplexCon is around the corner, and one of the acts we can't wait to see on the stage is the always unpredictable Jaden Smith. He's one of our 20 favorite artists under 20 years old, and even though he's been making music for years now, it feels like he's still only getting started. With that in mind, we hit the streets of New York to talk about Jaden Smith for the latest episode of Angelito in the Streets.

What do people think of Jaden's music? Can they tell the difference between a Jaden Smith tweet and a Confucius quote? Watch the video above to find out, and get your tickets to ComplexCon now to see Jaden and a bunch of other great artists perform.

See the full details of the Pigeons & Planes stage at ComplexCon here.

More from Complex

Ski Mask The Slump God is Putting Numbers on the Board

In the past year, we've seen so many rappers go from SoundCloud sensations to mainstream newcomers. It feels like an entirely new wave, but how many of these artists are going to last? That's still to be seen, but one thing is becoming increasingly clear: Ski Mask The Slump God is here to stay. He's been making all the right moves while dropping quality music, and it's paying off.

In the latest P&P Update, we take a look at Ski Mask's rise and break down some of his most impressive numbers. Watch above, check out Ski Mask The Slump God's episode of Trending Topics below, and subscribe to Pigeons & Planes on YouTube for more.

Ski Mask The Slump God will be performing on the Pigeons & Planes stage at ComplexCon in November, and you can get tickets now. See you out there.

More from Complex

Smokepurpp on Young Thug, Lil Pump, and Dogs

As we learn more about the group of artists first classified as “SoundCloud rappers,” the title feels increasingly inadequate. Smokepurpp is the latest South Florida phenom to break big, recently signing with Alamo Records and landing features from Chief Keef, Travis Scott, and D.R.A.M. for his Deadstar release.

Now that he's fully in the public eye, we wanted to see what Smokepurpp was thinking about during his rise—so we took a trip in Twitter's time machine and asked the Miami rapper what was going through his head when he forgot what a chicken was.  

Watch the latest episode of Trending Topics above, and listen to Deadstar below. 

Catch Smokepurpp live on the Pigeons & Planes stage at ComplexCon, which goes down November 4 and 5 in Long Beach, California. Tickets are on sale​ ​now.​

More from Complex

Arizona Rap Trio Injury Reserve Are Raising the Bar

Injury Reserve don't take themselves too seriously. Ritchie With a T, one of the two MCs in this rap trio, is trying to work out if he can float in the pool on a pink inflatable ring while we conduct the interview for this video. Unfortunately, he's sinking. In the end Parker Corey, the group's producer, and rapper Stepa J. Groggs decide to sit either side of a partially submerged Ritchie.

We're at Injury Reserve's base on a quiet, pine tree lined street in Pasadena, California, their new home since moving from Phoenix, Arizona earlier this year. After seeing success with two independently released projects (Live From the Dentist's Office and Floss) they decided a change of scenery was in order. Their new EP Drive It Like It's Stolen was recorded at this house, and it tackles themes like isolation and loneliness (“North Pole”) as well as having some straight up bangers (“See You Sweat”). Quite simply, it's their best work yet, and it's out September 29. 

We spent a day with Injury Reserve go-karting, hiking, and enjoying the pool to get to know one of the most exciting rising acts in rap. Watch what happened above. 

Catch Injury Reserve live on the Pigeons & Planes stage at ComplexCon, which goes down November 4 and 5 in Long Beach, California. Day time expo tickets allow​ entry into the event from 11am-7pm, and include ​access to​ ​the P&P stage, marketplace, and panels. They are on sale​ ​now at ComplexCon.com/tickets.

complexcon-2017

More from Complex

Yung Pinch is Putting Numbers on the Board

California rapper and singer Yung Pinch doesn’t come from the usual music hot spots like Los Angeles or the Bay Area—instead Pinch is from Huntington Beach, a city south of L.A. that’s better known for surfing and sunshine than rap music. That isn't stopping his rise though.

With a melodic style, sticky hooks, and lots of beach references, Yung Pinch is rising fast and racking up millions of plays. His consistency is also playing a part, as he has been cranking out tracks on his SoundCloud at an impressive pace. Yung Pinch just came off tour with SOB x RBE and OMB Peezy, and he has a lot of momentum going into the second half of 2017. Get familiar with our video above

Subscribe to Pigeons & Planes on YouTube for new music, interviews, documentaries, and more.

More from Complex

That Time Gucci Mane Got Floured While He Was Sleeping

In the newest episode of Pigeons & Planes' What Had Happened Was, Atlanta producer Zaytoven recounts a musical collaboration that unfortunately never came to fruition.

Zaytoven explains how a studio session in Atlanta with Gucci Mane quickly escalated after a prank was played on the unsuspecting rapper. Having fun is great and all but if you learn anything from the video, it’s that you should know when playing too much, is well, too much. Check out the hilarious video above to see what exactly went down. Hint: It involves flour. 

Luckily, it seems like Gucci was able to get past the incident as the pair have since worked together. If you missed it, check out Zaytoven and Gucci Mane do a stripped down set for NPR’s Tiny Desk performance series.

Gucci released his latest album The Return of East Atlanta Santa, his tenth studio outing, back in December of 2016. The album boasted features from Drake, Travis Scott, Bryson Tiller and  production from Metro Boomin, Southside, Mike Will Made It, Murda Beatz, Zaytoven, and others. Gucci will also be hitting the road alongside The Weeknd for his Legend of the Fall Tour.

 What Had Happened Was premieres every Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. ET on P&P.

 

More from Complex