Announcing ‘Hounded,’ the New Show Where Puppies Interview Rappers

When we first started making video content, one of our first ideas was to pair rappers with exotic animals. We quickly learned that getting permission to handle exotic animals in New York City is not easy, so we moved onto the next best thing: puppies. What came of combining puppies and rappers is Hounded, our new show where puppies interview the guests—but it's not as cute as it sounds. These puppies aren't asking fluffy questions, and things get pretty intense quickly, as you'll see.

Hounded, presented by Old Spice, premieres on the Pigeons & Planes YouTube channel on September 27, and our first guest is Wyclef Jean, who got deeply personal in episode one. Watch the trailer above, and stay tuned.

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Unboxing Nike’s ‘The Ten’ Collection by Virgil Abloh

Sole Collector's latest unboxing takes a closer look at four of the five pairs that initially released from Nike's “The Ten” Collection by Virgil Abloh.

The “Revealing” Air Max 90, Blazer, Air Presto, and Air Jordan 1 are all featured in the in-depth Unboxing, where we examine the materials used on each pair, as well as details like Abloh's signature red zip ties, quotation branding, and inside out boxes. 

If you missed out on the highly limited release in New York City, they will be receiving a worldwide release this November alongside the remaining five pairs from the collection. Also make sure to subscribe to the Sole Collector YouTube channel today to stay up to date with all of our latest videos.

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Nicki Minaj and Nas Have Reportedly Been Dating Since May

Nas and Nicki Minaj have been fueling dating rumors for months now. It all started with a rather cozy photo taken at Nas’ restaurant in New York City, Sweet Chick. To be fair, not much more happened over the summer, but the two were spotted again recently celebrating Nas’ birthday at The Pool Lounge in New York City with quite a lot of PDA. And now, a source has told E! News that the two Queens rappers have been dating since May.

“Nicki is not the type to date around,” the source said. “They are still getting to know each other.”

Both Nicki and Nas posted photos with each other on their Instagrams after the birthday party, with captions that at the very least suggest the two enjoy the other's company. 

 

Virgo Season With my Real One From Queens! @nickiminaj #hennessylife

A post shared by Nasir Jones (@nas) on Sep 14, 2017 at 9:09am PDT

 

The legend himself… #EscobarSeason

A post shared by Barbie® (@nickiminaj) on Sep 14, 2017 at 11:40am PDT

If this source has more or less confirmed that Nas and Nicki are dating, it would be mostly on par with what Nicki herself has been saying all year long. Nicki announced her breakup from Meek Mill in January of this year, and once the Nas dating rumors began swirling, Nicki was forced to address the rumors head-on when she appeared on Ellen in May. Nicki admitted that the she had “sleepovers” with Nas, but also insisted they had not done “the nasty.”

“I'm just chilling right now. I'm celibate. I wanted to go a year without dating any man. I hate men,” Nicki added. If they are taking things slow, the stories seem like they could match up. 

However, in case that isn’t the story you want to hear, E! News also got some contradicting news from yet another source. This other “insider” told E! News that Nas and Nicki Minaj are only close friends and have been for years.

“Nicki and Nas are just very dear friends. Nothing romantic. They've been friends forever and have seen each other's careers take off,” the source said. “Nas and John Seymour have recently just opened their second restaurant Sweet Chick in LA. The original Sweet Chick is in the LES [Lower East Side] in NYC. Nicki has been to both spots and always supportive of him and his new ventures,” the source said, as if he or she knew exactly why people are speculating about the two rappers’s relationships.

“They share a really close friendship and always has each other's back,” the source continued. “Nicki is single now and dating but nothing serious. Nas is a best friend to her so as of now nothing is stirring up. People always joke around though that they make a great couple!”

Well, there you have it, folks. Are Nas and Nicki just incredibly close friends or something more? Pick your own adventure!

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6 Dogs Shares “Faygo Dreams” Video, Explains His Unique Perspective on Life and Music

Like many fans, I had already heard pieces of the story behind 18-year-old artist 6 Dogs' upbringing before we met—he was homeschooled and raised in a religious household in Georgia, and his mom grounded him when she discovered his music. He persisted, and his unique blend of minimal hip-hop elements, hypnotic deliveries, and dream-like melodies earned him a dedicated and enormous following. Many of his songs have millions of plays, and “Faygo Dreams” has over six million on SoundCloud alone. But throughout his rise over the last year, he's remained an enigma, maintaining distance from the spotlight and holding onto his private lifestyle.

In late July, 6 Dogs came to New York City for the “Faygo Dreams” video shoot, and we planned to link up in Washington Square Park. Going into our meeting during a sunny day in New York City, I knew I wasn't hanging out with the average teenager. I expected someone shocked and possibly overwhelmed by the chaos of New York City, but I couldn't have been more wrong.

If I were to take a guess, I would say 6 Dogs was unimpressed by NYC. After speaking with him, I would even go so far as to say 6 Dogs is pretty unimpressed with the entire world that he was somewhat sheltered from his entire life. 

There couldn't be a crazier time for 6 Dogs to experience the world, but he's taking full advantage of the outsider perspective he has on life, and he's wrapping his head around a plan. Check out the video for “Faygo Dreams” above and keep scrolling for our full conversation with 6 Dogs.

6 Dogs
Photo by Jonathan Astacio

How did “Faygo Dreams” come together?

When I was making the song I just had the hook and my friend had this amazing beat. We made it in the library during lunch. We went in the library for a week, just tweaking and stuff. I was writing some stuff down and it all was corny. I decided to scrap the entire song and rewrite it about five minutes before I left to record it. Then I thought, “What’s something really cool? Faygo.” Then I thought, “What’s something else really cool? Dreams.” Then I put it together.

What about the video?

The video was a dream that I had. It was one of the craziest dreams I’ve had in my life, and I’m very into my dreams and trying to decipher them. You ever have dreams where you just know things without them being explained, even if it doesn’t match up in real life?

Yeah, like the dreams are an alternate reality.

So basically, I was in this arcade but it was purgatory. It wasn’t scary or anything, it wasn’t hellish. It was just a regular arcade, you could get food at the concession stand, you can play games. I was in this corner of the arcade playing one of the games and I ended up beating the game.

After I beat the game, it brought up three prizes that I could choose from. The first prize was that I could bring this kid I grew up with back to life—he killed himself last year. The second one was that I could bring Michael Jackson back to life, and the third prize was a bouncy ball and some quarters.

I was going through my options. I was looking at the kid I could bring back to life and decided, “I don’t need to bring him back. He’s at peace, he’s in a better place.” So then I got to Michael Jackson and I was like, “He doesn’t need to come back.” I just got an extremely negative vibe looking at the screen. So I ended up taking the bouncy ball and some quarters. It wasn’t like I wanted it, but it was the only option.

Did you ever figure out or look deeper into this dream that led to the video?

The thing with the video is, there’s a lot going on. You know there’s something there, and it’s something profound and incredibly deep, but you don’t know exactly what it is. By the end of the video you’re probably going to have more questions than answers.

For me as an artist, it’s not really my job to give you everything in a nice box with a bow on it. I’m not just going to give it to you, I kind of want to just give you this big mess and let you take a whack at it. That’s what this video is going to feel like.

The thing is, this dream could mean very much more but I haven’t explored that. With some things, you just don’t know and that’s kind of where I’m at with life. I have a few things that are solid in my life and aren’t moving, but there are other things where I have more questions than answers.

It’s interesting to think about. I have so many questions. The other day I was walking around I was like, “Yo, this is crazy. We’re on this ball that is just floating in space and we call it Earth. That is insane.” Things like that just make me wonder what is actually going on—this all is so weird. I’m enjoying it and I love it, I just don’t understand it.

That’s just kind of the thing with a lot of my stuff, some things contradict each other, some things don’t make sense, it’s really up to the listener.

Talking down about other people and talking yourself up and disrespecting women is crazy. It’s sickening how bad it is. The fact that people are putting that on a pedestal and applauding it is crazy.

I think in life you get put in situations like in that dream where you have the option to change certain things, but after thinking it through you just don’t do anything. That’s what the quarters and the bouncy ball reminded me of—sometimes things are fine the way they are.

Exactly, I didn’t even make that connection but me choosing the quarters and the ball is where I am in life. I don’t really know what’s going on but I’m cool with it. It’s nice, existing is a really nice thing. I don’t take it for granted or anything.

Where did the curiosity come from?

I’ve always been like that since I was a kid. Take Legos, for example. I would never use the instructions with the Legos, and I would never build what was on the front of the box. I would always build something random. I’ve always questioned everything because everything is so weird. Why would you not question everything?

I question everything, but at the same time I’m not freaking out. I’m just like, “Yo, that’s crazy, that makes no sense.” It’s in the back of my mind, but I’m always chilling. It’s a weird combination. I have friends who are deep and philosophical and I’m kind of like that too but I just have accepted that there’s nothing I can do about it. I’m just not gonna know, I’m gonna keep trying and sometimes it’ll work, sometimes it won’t. At the end of the day I’m just chilling and creating.

Do you think that your music will inspire the deeper thinkers and help them find some of the answers they’re looking for?

Yeah for sure, I feel like I’m helping them understand themselves. It sounds corny, but everyone doesn’t have to be like me. Everyone doesn’t have to think about the deepest thing ever with a blank look on their face. If I inspire them to understand themselves, that’s cool, because for me, I’ve just been talking about how I feel. With the whole flexing, talking about myself, money, and talking about girls stuff, I’m not really with that. That’s another thing that makes absolutely no sense to me, and that is what rap is currently. I don’t understand it at all. It blows my mind on a regular basis.

Rap as a genre?

Not as a genre, just the content. I love the sound, but the content feels like someone sitting in the booth with headphones on, rapping into the mic while they’re looking in a mirror saying, “Dang, I look good” and then talking about themselves. I just don’t understand it, if someone was just bragging in person in front of me, I’d be like, “Yo, get out of my face, you’re weird.” Then there's the stuff that’s said about women, if you said any of that stuff in a public area you’d get jumped. The stuff they’re saying is wrong.​

Isn’t that trippy how in rap, that kind of talk is normal and it’s the kids that don’t talk about those things that are labeled weird?

Talking down about other people and talking yourself up and disrespecting women is crazy. It’s sickening how bad it is. The fact that people are putting that on a pedestal and applauding it is crazy. That’s one thing about humans that makes me think like, “Yo, you guys are weird.”

So then who or what inspired you to become 6 Dogs and make your music?

I grew up homeschooled in Georgia, kind of in the mountains. My mom’s Christian so I was completely removed from music as a whole. All we really listened to was Christian music. I think that plays to my advantage, because I have an outside perspective and I’m not influenced by certain things that most people would be influenced by. That really attributes to why I’m so different.

The first rap that I ever really listened to was MC Hammer, and then when I started actually getting into the genre it was Lil Wayne, some Drake, Kanye’s hits. “All Of The Lights,” “Power,” stuff like that. Then I started progressively getting more into it, but a few months ago I just stopped listening to rap completely.

I have friends that’ll play stuff and be like, “You know that Pharrell song?” and I’ll be like, “No, I don’t know that Pharrell song.” They’ll show it to me and I’ll take a little inspiration. That’s why I think being so removed is an advantage, because whenever I do hear stuff, it’s later than everyone else and I’m hearing it for the first time.

What made you decide to do music? It seems like you put a lot of thought into it.

I was a lifeguard and I would work six hours a day just thinking about it. I’m not a normal person, I don’t want to be another sheep. Making music is one of the biggest stages in the world, and music is the universal language. I’m good at coming up with ideas, eventually I want to get into movies. I want to make an anime show one day. It’s not just music, it’s creating. I want to create every day.

Also I was going through stuff when I started and needed an outlet, so music helped me a lot. That was the catalyst—me feeling bad and wanting to do something about it.

Are you in a better headspace now?

Totally. I’m just existing. I’m chilling and enjoying what comes my way.

I was just trying to be trendy. I’ll be real with myself. But the stuff that I have been starting to make doesn’t sound like anything else I’ve made. It sounds really good though

Did you already know what to do as 6 Dogs, and what would and wouldn’t work for your music?

Nah, I was just trying to be trendy. I’ll be real with myself. But the stuff that I have been starting to make doesn’t sound like anything else I’ve made. It sounds really good though, and I'm talking about stuff that I find important. That’s it. I’m not trying to do what everybody else is doing. Let’s be honest, it’s about time. I feel like everybody knew that the idea of what everyone considers to be a rapper was going to collapse eventually, because it doesn’t make sense.

How do you think you’re going to adjust to the music industry?

A ton of labels have already hit me up. I have a manager now, I’m getting a lawyer. I know how it works, I know that there are mistakes and you have to watch your back at all times. It’s fine, it’s nothing I can’t handle. I already get the gist and I have my foot in the door.

It’s about to get crazy, I know a bunch of people are going to hit me up. It’s going to be challenging but I have my friends, I have a girl, she’s sitting right across from me. I have everything I need already and I don’t really need anything else.

The only thing that’s going to change is how much money is in my bank account. I’m not clout chasing or anything, that’s so dead. I’m just making solid music. People get too caught up in all this stuff and make it all complicated. There’s a formula, but a lot of people get tripped up and hang out with people that only say yes.

Where do you see 6 Dogs in a few years?

I’m going to be doing the same stuff with the same people. Again, the only thing that’s going to be different is the money in my bank account. I’m not trying to sound cocky, but I’ll be a household name. Sooner than four or five years, probably a year, maybe two. The stuff that I’ve been working on… I think I’m starting to find my groove and starting to get into a rhythm. I see things going really well.

Do you have a name for your project or a timetable for your plan to release?

I don’t have a name, and I don’t want to set a date because I don’t want time to be a factor in the project. I want the project to be perfect. I’m not saying it’s going to take a year, but I don’t want to say two months and then be pressured to make that time. I want to take my time and make every song really good.

6 Dogs GIF
Image via Jonathan Astacio

 

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Public School on Working on the Air Jordan XV: “It’s a Love It or Hate It Shoe”

Public School is the definitive product of two New York City natives and their go-getter spirits. In less than 10 years since its 2008 inception, founders Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne —who met while working at Sean John— catapulted their own menswear brand to immense popularity with a high-fashion-meets-streetwear approach to design, racking up multiple awards in the process.

While the style and wearability of the apparel made a name for itself, Public School truly claimed its stake as leaders in the fashion industry when it teamed up with Jordan Brand. After working on exclusive friends-and-family versions of the Air Jordan 1, Air Jordan X, and Carmelo Anthony's M10, the NYC-based brand expanded its horizon and launched the PSNY x Air Jordan XII to the public — a dark-grey luxe rendition that resonated with the purest of sneakerheads and menswear enthusiasts alike. The collab was the precursor to three more Air Jordan XIIs that embodied the brand’s hometown of New York City, as well as Paris and Milan.

After a small world tour with the XIIs, the Public School duo is back home for New York Fashion Week to debut their Spring/Summer 2018 collection and a brand new capsule in collaboration with Jordan Brand. Using the black sheep of the Air Jordan lineage, the XV, Public School re-imagined Tinker Hatfield’s original design in ways never seen before. The collection includes Air Jordan XVs for men in black suede, an olive woven material, and for the first time ever, an Air Jordan XV boot for women.

PSNY x Air Jordan XV
Image via Nike

The successful runway show located in the heart of Chinatown was followed up with a nearby pop-up shop, where the footwear and apparel was available for purchase. There, Complex caught up with the PSNY founders, joined fellow Sean John alumnus and current Senior Director of Energy Projects at Jordan Brand Gemo Wong, to talk about the latest drop.

Check out out the latest episode of #LifeAtComplex for a closer look at the star-studded event, inside the pop-up shop, and interview.

How did Public School’s relationship with Jordan Brand first come about?
Gemo Wong: So I’ve known Dao-Yi for a while, we used to work together. As his brand Public School kind of progressed, it felt like the timing was right to do something especially in the apparel space. The partnership started with apparel first and then we kind of explored footwear

After doing your first footwear collaboration, did you know it would become an ongoing partnership?
GW: We just kind of did what we felt was right. It’s all about time, who we [Jordan] are as a brand and who they are as a brand.

What was the motivation behind using the Air Jordan XV for this collab?
Dao-Yi Chao: It’s starts with a conversation. The great thing about working with Gemo and his team is that, there isn’t a set schedule, there isn’t a set plan. We only work when we feel it’s right. When we a great idea, we take it to him and if he likes the idea, he’ll set things into motion. With the XVs specifically, Gemo’s always challenged us to work on shoes that sort of lie outside of the 1s, IIIs, IVs, Vs, VIs, XIs — the really popular ones that iterated a l lot and so we enjoy that challenge. Coming off working on the XII, changing that iconic shoe into something that was definitively Public School, was something that we wanted to carry over on the XVs. It’s a love it or hate it shoe.

Yeah, even Tinker Hatfield, who designed it, has said that it’s his least favorite Air Jordan.
DC: Did he say that?

GW: He’s said that on paper, yeah.

He’s said that on record. Were there any challenges you faced while designing these Air Jordan XVs?
Maxwell Osborne: Not really. Maybe on the women’s side, trying to make the boot.

DC: That was another idea that was born just out of conversation. Like, “Yo, we wanna do it during Fashion Week during the show, but it’s a women’s show. It would be crazy if we turned the XV into a boot!”

It already is kind of chunky like a boot.
DC: Exactly. We wanted to accentuate the obvious things about the shoes. The fold back on the tongue I guess is what you would call it — all of those things we wanted to really build on top of, but make it feel like our own shoe. That’s the point of any good collaboration. You gotta add something to it. It’s already great in its own realm, but how do you add to it and make it something better?

PSNY x Air Jordan 15 Knee-High Boot
the Public School x Air Jordan XV boot for women. Images via Antonio de Moraes Barros for Getty Images

The tongue of the sneakers feature a “WNL” logo. What does the “We Need Leaders” motto specifically mean to Public School as a brand?
MO: “We Need Leaders” for us, was really a call to action. It was for everybody to step up. Us, our team, everybody around the world, just to step up and be better. It also mean when no one’s looking. So, are you the same type of person when the lights turn off and you go home? Are you the same type of person you show face to when you step out of that? WNL mean a lot to us in terms of special leadership and people stepping up to the plate.

When you first released the first grey PSNY XIIs did you expect such a big reaction?
DC: I don’t know, I didn’t know what to expect.

GW: You always have your fingers crossed. You always go in wishing the best. We took a different approach to it, so we were hoping for a good response, especially in [Public School’s] space, the fashion space, it was good overall.

Did the response play a part in following up with the city series or was it already in the works?
GW: Again it all comes down to what we felt was right timing wise, what these guys are into, and making sure the brands are in tune, so as a evolution as the grey we felt like doing the City pack was a good addition.

DC: We say that thing and always felt it was almost boot-like, the way we molded it out, so we just sampled it in a wheat colorway because it felt like a boot. So from there, again, just from the conversation, they put it into work. We it came back we were like, “What if we flip three colors — the Wheat is so New York— what if we created a colorway for Paris and a colorway for Milan?” That’s how it goes, then we try it out. If it don’t feel right then we keep it moving, but if we’re onto something, I think it all clicks with us and we push it forward.

When that release happened launching the collection over multiple cities, it really changed the way retail works. Do you guys plan to do that again, say with this release?
GW: It all depends on the project, the time, how we feel when we all get together.

PSNY x Air Jordan 15 Olive Suede
A sample version of the Public School x Air Jordan XV collaboration, worn by Jordan Brand designer Frank Cooke. Image via Frank Cooker

Gemo, can you explain your role as head of Energy Projects at Jordan Brand?
GW: I’m Senior Director of Energy Projects. That’s everything from what you see here — footwear, apparel, to anything limited and sought after within the brand.

How do you decide on which people to work with like KAWS, Drake, or Travis Scott?
GW: It just all depends on where the brand is at. I don’t want to feel like we have to do collabs. I feel like we should let collabs enhance the brand, rather than we need them for the brand. It takes the pressure off. There is no, “Oh man, I gotta do a collab this month, next month.” As with this project, it’s just timing, where we are as a brand and if it feels right, then we do it.

Why is it important for Jordan Brand to focus on fashion and lifestyle versus just sports?
GW: We concentrate a lot on sports as well. It just so happens that we do some fashion stuff. You look at our portfolio, we still do a lot in the basketball space with athletes like Russ and all their signature shoes, but we also do stuff in the fashion space. Our brand means a lot to everyone, which could be a gift and a curse. As result, we just try to balance it out.

What was it like working with Diddy back during your time at Sean John?
MO: All three of us met at Sean John actually. How did it feel? It felt great! [Laughs] You got Puff’s son behind you.

DC: That brand, that moment in time sort of represented this idea of aspiration. Everything about Puff, even outside of fashion was you should aspire for something better. I think that really stuck with us. That idea of aspiration, doing something unexpected, but always presenting this idea of aspiration to do something better or to make something better. We all went different routes, but that definitely stuck with us.

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Sneaker Shopping With Rich The Kid

Rich The Kid, one of the hottest up and coming rappers who is currently on tour with Future and has a new album on the way, recently took time to meet up with Joe La Puma at Stadium Goods in New York City for the latest episode of Complex's Sneaker Shopping.

In the episode, Rich talks about his love of skateboarding, how he's skated with Lil Wayne, and his favorite Nike SB Dunks. He also reveals that him and Off White designer Virgil Abloh have been working together on a skateboarding shoe. Rich goes on to discuss how he wanted a pair of Air Jordans when he was younger and couldn't afford them, so he decided to flip bikes in his neighborhood to get the money for the sneakers. He also talks about his relationship with teenage re-selling prodigy Benjamin Kickz, shooting a video in a Goyard store, all en route to spending over $6,600 (one of the highest totals on Sneaker Shopping on Jordans, Yeezys, and more).

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New Report Exposes Alleged Concert Ticket Scheme Orchestrated by Fyre Festival Organizer

When reports started coming out about the doomed Fyre Festival, which was originally billed as a “luxury” music festival and advertised by the likes of Kendall Jenner and Bella Hadid and which promised performances from Pusha T, Desiigner, Lil Yachty, Blink-182, and more, it became clear the whole thing had sounded too good to be true.

Billy McFarland, one of the masterminds behind the catastrophic festival and the owner of Fyre Media, has been hit with several lawsuits, arrested and charged with fraud, and been forced to place Fyre Festival LLC under involuntary bankruptcy. But Fyre Media is not the only company McFarland owned. He is also the CEO of Magnises, a company he founded prior to Fyre Media, that functioned as a members-only concierge service. However, documents acquired by VICE News suggest McFarland has been mismanaging that company’s finances, too, by running what appeared to be a complicated concert ticket scheme.

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One of the benefits that Magnises offered its members was discounted concert and event tickets. But credit card records suggest that McFarland was buying the tickets from third-party distributors like Ticketmaster, StubHub, and Vivid Seats and then selling them to Magnises members at a significant loss.

Moreover, McFarland used a Fyre Media corporate credit card to pay for many of the Magnises tickets, effectively ensuring that both companies suffered similar financial woes even though they were entirely different entities. McFarland allegedly charged his Fyre Media American Express credit card for more than $1 million worth of tickets in just four months.

The records also show that other Fyre Media company credit cards were issued to at least nine employees including co-founder Ja Rule and Grant Margolin, the music festival’s marketing director. But the charges on those cards “appear reasonably related to the Fyre Media business,” according to VICE. It's the charges on McFarland’s card that raise the most eyebrows, since that’s where more than $1 million worth of Ticketmaster, StubHub, and Vivid Seats tickets were charged.

The problem for McFarland is that Fyre Media was conceived as an app for people to book artists for private events. It never claimed to sell tickets for concerts and events. Magnises did.

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Former employees and Magnises members claim that McFarland would advertise and sell tickets to events he did not already have tickets to. And when the event dates arrived, McFarland would either cancel the reservations or provide tickets purchased through third-party organizations.

For example, Magnises advertised tickets to a series of Adele concerts in September 2016. A former employee told VICE McFarland did not possess the tickets he advertised and the whole situation sounds like it was a total clusterfuck.

“What happened with Adele was that we found out that Billy wasn’t going through a source in Live Nation at all, because for that concert, there were no e-tickets available; the whole thing was all ticket stubs,” the anonymous former employee told VICE. “We had to go and meet with these brokers who act as third-party buyers around MSG. And we’re spending the whole time running around the city trying to get them together and figure out how many they have and who’s going to go in which section.”

What’s more, McFarland was apparently buying the tickets on the same day as the performances. McFarland’s credit card records show more than $150,000 worth of StubHub, Vivid Seats, Fan Exchange, and My Ticket Tracker charges on September 19, 20, 22, 23, 25 and 26, the exact days Adele was performing at Madison Square Garden. There were no ticket charges on September 21 and 24, when she did not perform.

A similar situation happened when Magnises offered members $250 tickets for Hamilton. McFarland’s Fyre Media American Express records have charges totaling almost $30,000 labeled with Vivid Seats and Hamilton. The cheapest transaction with this label is $1,401.30, which means McFarland was operating on at least a $1,200 loss per ticket for this Hamilton deal through Magnises.

Finally, McFarland’s company offered discounted floor tickets to Kanye West’s Saint Pablo Tour in June 2016 at $275 each, about $100 less than the median resale ticket price. As should be expected by now, McFarland’s credit card records show more than $10,000 worth of Ticketmaster charges on the first night the Saint Pablo Tour arrived in New York City, September 5, 2016, also at Madison Square Garden.

All of this appears as though it's going to make life even more difficult for McFarland. Outside of the headache he's dealing with due to the Fyre Festival issues, he's also going to have to explain why it appears he was running a ticket scheme in the months leading up to that debacle.

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Sneaker Shopping With Roger Federer

19-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer is the biggest sneakerhead in the tennis world, and he joined Joe La Puma before the U.S. Open for the latest episode of Complex's Sneaker Shopping at Stadium Goods in New York City to talk about getting his own Air Jordan collab and the sneakers he wears off the court.

 

In the episode, Federer talks about what it was like to work with legendary Nike and Air Jordan designer Tinker Hatfield and how he designed Federer's signature sneaker in an hour on his iPad. Federer also talks about getting his own version of the Air Jordan III and how he looked up to Michael Jordan when he was growing up. He goes on to say that Nike doesn't send him every sneaker that he wants, talks about wearing Supreme x Nike collaborations, and why he loves the Air Force 1. In the end, Federer spends over $5,100 on a mix of Nike and Jordan sneakers.

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Sneaker Shopping With Meek Mill

Platinum-selling rap artist Meek Mill is one of the most authentic rappers in the industry and a true representative of Philadelphia culture, and he joined Joe La Puma at Stadium Goods in New York City to go Sneaker Shopping and talk about his roots and love for sneakers.

In the episode, Meek says that he and his friends used to look to Allen Iverson, and that meeting him later in his life was a dream come true. He also mentions that he's no longer locked into a sneaker deal, and explains how important it is to wear different footwear brands. Meek goes onto tell stories about wearing Jordans growing up, the shoes he likes to wear while riding dirt bikes, and how sneakers motivated him to pursue his rap career. In the end, he spends over $3,800 on Jordans, Supreme Nikes and Vans, and more.

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Rita Ora Goes Sneaker Shopping

Pop star Rita Ora is an international sensation, and she's one of the biggest sneakerheads in the industry. Rita met up with Joe La Puma at Stadium Goods in New York City for the latest episode of Sneaker Shopping, and she talked about how deep her roots go in footwear, from working retail to landing her own major collaboration.

Growing up in London, Rita worked at international sneaker boutique Size?, and in the episode she talks about how her and her friends used to be the cool girls at the shop, blasting her music, and hooking her friends up with sneakers. Rita then goes on to talk about her love for Air Jordans from an early age, and how things came full circle for her when she landed her own sneaker deal with Adidas, something that resulted in over 15 different collections. In the end, she spends over $2,200 on a mix of new sneakers.

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