Paul Rosenberg May Have Revealed the Title of Eminem’s Upcoming Album

Paul Rosenberg tried to spread the word about Yelawolf's upcoming album Trial by Fire, but it looks like he has simultaneously​ unveiled the title of Eminem's much anticipated new project. On Wednesday, Rosenberg posted a photo of himself holding the physical copy of Yelawolf's third studio effort with the caption, “@Yelawolf TRIAL BY FIRE comes out this Friday 10/27! #cdbaby.”

 

Look what arrived at the Shady offices today! @Yelawolf TRIAL BY FIRE comes out this Friday 10/27! #cdbaby

A post shared by Paul Rosenberg (@rosenberg) on Oct 25, 2017 at 1:26pm PDT

In the background, there appears to be a harmless looking billboard promoting a medication called “Revival.” 

However, the medication sports the backwards “E” synonymous with Em's logo. Reddit detectives then pinpointed that the full ad online was placed by Interscope Records. There's also a website for “Revival” that offers some clues, hinting at Em's involvement with what seems to be the fake medication. “Revival” is said to treat the ailment “Atrox Rithimus,” which is also not a real thing. 

If you call the number 1-833-243-8738 you'll be greeted by a voice that says “Thank you for your interest in Revival, the No. 1 slightly invasive treatment for Atrox Rithimus. You only get one shot to beat AR,” an obvious reference to Em's song “Lose Yourself.” Dr. Dre and Eminem's song “I Need A Doctor” is also playing in the background. The automated message then continues, “Don't miss your chance with Revival. Please hold to speak to a patient care representative.” 

We reached out to Eminem's rep for a comment though have yet to receive a response. We'll update when we hear back. If this is actually a part of the promotional campaign for the new album, which it sure looks to be, it's pretty creative and thorough. 

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#LifeAtComplex: Crazy Adidas Basketball Package

#LifeAtComplex is a daily vlog that offers an inside look at Complex. Watch as Tony Mui takes viewers behind-the-scenes in the office—you never know who or what will pop up.

On today's episode Tony and Al unbox a special package from Adidas. Zoe continues to cook up “music” in the studio, meanwhile Chopz and Frazier talk about the incident that occurred over the weekend between Lil B and A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie. 

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6 Dogs Shares “Faygo Dreams” Video, Explains His Unique Perspective on Life and Music

Like many fans, I had already heard pieces of the story behind 18-year-old artist 6 Dogs' upbringing before we met—he was homeschooled and raised in a religious household in Georgia, and his mom grounded him when she discovered his music. He persisted, and his unique blend of minimal hip-hop elements, hypnotic deliveries, and dream-like melodies earned him a dedicated and enormous following. Many of his songs have millions of plays, and “Faygo Dreams” has over six million on SoundCloud alone. But throughout his rise over the last year, he's remained an enigma, maintaining distance from the spotlight and holding onto his private lifestyle.

In late July, 6 Dogs came to New York City for the “Faygo Dreams” video shoot, and we planned to link up in Washington Square Park. Going into our meeting during a sunny day in New York City, I knew I wasn't hanging out with the average teenager. I expected someone shocked and possibly overwhelmed by the chaos of New York City, but I couldn't have been more wrong.

If I were to take a guess, I would say 6 Dogs was unimpressed by NYC. After speaking with him, I would even go so far as to say 6 Dogs is pretty unimpressed with the entire world that he was somewhat sheltered from his entire life. 

There couldn't be a crazier time for 6 Dogs to experience the world, but he's taking full advantage of the outsider perspective he has on life, and he's wrapping his head around a plan. Check out the video for “Faygo Dreams” above and keep scrolling for our full conversation with 6 Dogs.

6 Dogs
Photo by Jonathan Astacio

How did “Faygo Dreams” come together?

When I was making the song I just had the hook and my friend had this amazing beat. We made it in the library during lunch. We went in the library for a week, just tweaking and stuff. I was writing some stuff down and it all was corny. I decided to scrap the entire song and rewrite it about five minutes before I left to record it. Then I thought, “What’s something really cool? Faygo.” Then I thought, “What’s something else really cool? Dreams.” Then I put it together.

What about the video?

The video was a dream that I had. It was one of the craziest dreams I’ve had in my life, and I’m very into my dreams and trying to decipher them. You ever have dreams where you just know things without them being explained, even if it doesn’t match up in real life?

Yeah, like the dreams are an alternate reality.

So basically, I was in this arcade but it was purgatory. It wasn’t scary or anything, it wasn’t hellish. It was just a regular arcade, you could get food at the concession stand, you can play games. I was in this corner of the arcade playing one of the games and I ended up beating the game.

After I beat the game, it brought up three prizes that I could choose from. The first prize was that I could bring this kid I grew up with back to life—he killed himself last year. The second one was that I could bring Michael Jackson back to life, and the third prize was a bouncy ball and some quarters.

I was going through my options. I was looking at the kid I could bring back to life and decided, “I don’t need to bring him back. He’s at peace, he’s in a better place.” So then I got to Michael Jackson and I was like, “He doesn’t need to come back.” I just got an extremely negative vibe looking at the screen. So I ended up taking the bouncy ball and some quarters. It wasn’t like I wanted it, but it was the only option.

Did you ever figure out or look deeper into this dream that led to the video?

The thing with the video is, there’s a lot going on. You know there’s something there, and it’s something profound and incredibly deep, but you don’t know exactly what it is. By the end of the video you’re probably going to have more questions than answers.

For me as an artist, it’s not really my job to give you everything in a nice box with a bow on it. I’m not just going to give it to you, I kind of want to just give you this big mess and let you take a whack at it. That’s what this video is going to feel like.

The thing is, this dream could mean very much more but I haven’t explored that. With some things, you just don’t know and that’s kind of where I’m at with life. I have a few things that are solid in my life and aren’t moving, but there are other things where I have more questions than answers.

It’s interesting to think about. I have so many questions. The other day I was walking around I was like, “Yo, this is crazy. We’re on this ball that is just floating in space and we call it Earth. That is insane.” Things like that just make me wonder what is actually going on—this all is so weird. I’m enjoying it and I love it, I just don’t understand it.

That’s just kind of the thing with a lot of my stuff, some things contradict each other, some things don’t make sense, it’s really up to the listener.

Talking down about other people and talking yourself up and disrespecting women is crazy. It’s sickening how bad it is. The fact that people are putting that on a pedestal and applauding it is crazy.

I think in life you get put in situations like in that dream where you have the option to change certain things, but after thinking it through you just don’t do anything. That’s what the quarters and the bouncy ball reminded me of—sometimes things are fine the way they are.

Exactly, I didn’t even make that connection but me choosing the quarters and the ball is where I am in life. I don’t really know what’s going on but I’m cool with it. It’s nice, existing is a really nice thing. I don’t take it for granted or anything.

Where did the curiosity come from?

I’ve always been like that since I was a kid. Take Legos, for example. I would never use the instructions with the Legos, and I would never build what was on the front of the box. I would always build something random. I’ve always questioned everything because everything is so weird. Why would you not question everything?

I question everything, but at the same time I’m not freaking out. I’m just like, “Yo, that’s crazy, that makes no sense.” It’s in the back of my mind, but I’m always chilling. It’s a weird combination. I have friends who are deep and philosophical and I’m kind of like that too but I just have accepted that there’s nothing I can do about it. I’m just not gonna know, I’m gonna keep trying and sometimes it’ll work, sometimes it won’t. At the end of the day I’m just chilling and creating.

Do you think that your music will inspire the deeper thinkers and help them find some of the answers they’re looking for?

Yeah for sure, I feel like I’m helping them understand themselves. It sounds corny, but everyone doesn’t have to be like me. Everyone doesn’t have to think about the deepest thing ever with a blank look on their face. If I inspire them to understand themselves, that’s cool, because for me, I’ve just been talking about how I feel. With the whole flexing, talking about myself, money, and talking about girls stuff, I’m not really with that. That’s another thing that makes absolutely no sense to me, and that is what rap is currently. I don’t understand it at all. It blows my mind on a regular basis.

Rap as a genre?

Not as a genre, just the content. I love the sound, but the content feels like someone sitting in the booth with headphones on, rapping into the mic while they’re looking in a mirror saying, “Dang, I look good” and then talking about themselves. I just don’t understand it, if someone was just bragging in person in front of me, I’d be like, “Yo, get out of my face, you’re weird.” Then there's the stuff that’s said about women, if you said any of that stuff in a public area you’d get jumped. The stuff they’re saying is wrong.​

Isn’t that trippy how in rap, that kind of talk is normal and it’s the kids that don’t talk about those things that are labeled weird?

Talking down about other people and talking yourself up and disrespecting women is crazy. It’s sickening how bad it is. The fact that people are putting that on a pedestal and applauding it is crazy. That’s one thing about humans that makes me think like, “Yo, you guys are weird.”

So then who or what inspired you to become 6 Dogs and make your music?

I grew up homeschooled in Georgia, kind of in the mountains. My mom’s Christian so I was completely removed from music as a whole. All we really listened to was Christian music. I think that plays to my advantage, because I have an outside perspective and I’m not influenced by certain things that most people would be influenced by. That really attributes to why I’m so different.

The first rap that I ever really listened to was MC Hammer, and then when I started actually getting into the genre it was Lil Wayne, some Drake, Kanye’s hits. “All Of The Lights,” “Power,” stuff like that. Then I started progressively getting more into it, but a few months ago I just stopped listening to rap completely.

I have friends that’ll play stuff and be like, “You know that Pharrell song?” and I’ll be like, “No, I don’t know that Pharrell song.” They’ll show it to me and I’ll take a little inspiration. That’s why I think being so removed is an advantage, because whenever I do hear stuff, it’s later than everyone else and I’m hearing it for the first time.

What made you decide to do music? It seems like you put a lot of thought into it.

I was a lifeguard and I would work six hours a day just thinking about it. I’m not a normal person, I don’t want to be another sheep. Making music is one of the biggest stages in the world, and music is the universal language. I’m good at coming up with ideas, eventually I want to get into movies. I want to make an anime show one day. It’s not just music, it’s creating. I want to create every day.

Also I was going through stuff when I started and needed an outlet, so music helped me a lot. That was the catalyst—me feeling bad and wanting to do something about it.

Are you in a better headspace now?

Totally. I’m just existing. I’m chilling and enjoying what comes my way.

I was just trying to be trendy. I’ll be real with myself. But the stuff that I have been starting to make doesn’t sound like anything else I’ve made. It sounds really good though

Did you already know what to do as 6 Dogs, and what would and wouldn’t work for your music?

Nah, I was just trying to be trendy. I’ll be real with myself. But the stuff that I have been starting to make doesn’t sound like anything else I’ve made. It sounds really good though, and I'm talking about stuff that I find important. That’s it. I’m not trying to do what everybody else is doing. Let’s be honest, it’s about time. I feel like everybody knew that the idea of what everyone considers to be a rapper was going to collapse eventually, because it doesn’t make sense.

How do you think you’re going to adjust to the music industry?

A ton of labels have already hit me up. I have a manager now, I’m getting a lawyer. I know how it works, I know that there are mistakes and you have to watch your back at all times. It’s fine, it’s nothing I can’t handle. I already get the gist and I have my foot in the door.

It’s about to get crazy, I know a bunch of people are going to hit me up. It’s going to be challenging but I have my friends, I have a girl, she’s sitting right across from me. I have everything I need already and I don’t really need anything else.

The only thing that’s going to change is how much money is in my bank account. I’m not clout chasing or anything, that’s so dead. I’m just making solid music. People get too caught up in all this stuff and make it all complicated. There’s a formula, but a lot of people get tripped up and hang out with people that only say yes.

Where do you see 6 Dogs in a few years?

I’m going to be doing the same stuff with the same people. Again, the only thing that’s going to be different is the money in my bank account. I’m not trying to sound cocky, but I’ll be a household name. Sooner than four or five years, probably a year, maybe two. The stuff that I’ve been working on… I think I’m starting to find my groove and starting to get into a rhythm. I see things going really well.

Do you have a name for your project or a timetable for your plan to release?

I don’t have a name, and I don’t want to set a date because I don’t want time to be a factor in the project. I want the project to be perfect. I’m not saying it’s going to take a year, but I don’t want to say two months and then be pressured to make that time. I want to take my time and make every song really good.

6 Dogs GIF
Image via Jonathan Astacio

 

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N*E*R*D, Gucci Mane, Young Thug, and M.I.A. Set to Headline Second Annual ComplexCon

The music lineup for the second annual ComplexCon has officially been announced, and it expands on everything that made the first year such a success for fans of the latest and greatest in hip-hop. N*E*R*D is set to headline the first night of the two-day festival, which kicks off on Nov. 4 in Long Beach, California. Gucci Mane, M.I.A., and Young Thug will headline the second night on Nov. 5.

In addition to the headliners, there will also be a long list of other performers set to hit the stage at ComplexCon. Those performers will include DJ Khaled, A-Trak and Friends, D.R.A.M., SUPERDUPERKYLE, A$AP Ferg, Jaden Smith, Virgil Abloh, i am OTHER #BeGreat Party ft. Special Guests, Noname, Ski Mask the Slump God, Wifisfuneral, Dreezy, Chloe x Halle, Injury Reserve, Ronny J Presents, Cozy Boys, and more. Additionally, Fool’s Gold Day Off will make ComplexCon its southern California performance stop.

Tickets for ComplexCon will go on sale starting at 12 p.m. PST on August 25 at Complexcon.com.

Want to experience Complex IRL? Check out our second annual ComplexCon, a festival and exhibition taking place in Long Beach, California Nov. 4-5. Host committee members include Murakami, Pharrell, Virgil Abloh, Sarah Andelman, J Balvin and Jaden Smith. For more information on performers, panels, and tickets, visit here

complexcon-2017-flyer-1
 

 

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Watch Our Uncut Interview With Trippie Redd

Earlier this month, we spent a day in Miami with Trippie Redd while he was there to perform with XXXTentacion and Tekashi69. We used some of the interview for our 24 Hours in Miami With Trippie Redd video, but a lot of good stuff didn't make the cut.

During the full version of the interview, Trippie tells us about where he comes from (the same small town as Marilyn Manson), why he hates comparisons but loves the number 14, his hit song “Love Scars,” and what he thinks of Kanye West, Drake, and MF DOOM. 

Trippie Redd is a versatile artist with a dynamic personality and there's still a lot we don't know about him, but this interview offers some good insight into Trippie's goals, perspective, and background. Watch the full thing above, and see more from our time in Miami below.

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‘Get Out’ Is the Most Profitable Movie of 2017

In news that is neither shocking nor hard to believe, Jordan Peele's Get Out is a dope movie that has made a ton of money. According to a new report by The Wrap, Get Out is officially the most profitable movie of the year, raking in a whopping $217 million in profits and a 630 percent return on investment (ROI). 

The team behind Get Out can count this latest accomplishment as one of many, including its near-perfect 99% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes and its status as the highest-grossing original screenplay debut, an honor that Get Out swiped from The Blair Witch Project.

Here’s the breakdown: the film grossed $252 million (!!!) worldwide. It cost $4.5 million to make, plus an estimated $30 million marketing budget, which brings us to the $217 million profit. This means Peele is looking at a major yield for his indie, socially conscious horror flick, with his 630 percent ROI ranking as the highest of the year, so far. 

M. Night Shyamalan’s Split comes in second; it cost $9 million to make and made $277 million worldwide at the box office, meaning its ROI is a cool 610 percent. The most interesting tidbit here is the fact that Split came out of the same production house as Get Out: Blumhouse Productions. With the successes of these two films alone, Jason Blum, founder and CEO of Blumhouse, is proving his business strategy of combining potentially “risky” scripts with tight budgets can work out well for all parties involved. (It probably doesn’t hurt that Get Out was also just a great movie.)

To provide a frame of reference, the Emma Watson-led Beauty and the Beast remake from Disney is still technically the highest-grossing movie of the year, since it made $1.26 billion worldwide at the box office. However, it hasn’t been as profitable as Get Out or Split, since it cost $160 million to make, pulling its ROI much lower to around 400 percent.

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iPhone 8 Camera Upgrades Will Allow You to Take Super Hi-Def Selfies

The iPhone 8 rumor mill has been in overdrive ahead of Apple’s highly anticipated, yet still unconfirmed release of its newest phone. Since this year marks the 10-year anniversary of Apple's first iteration of the iPhone, which changed history forever, many believe the iPhone 8 will come with a plethora of fancy new features. A recent leakwhich, by the way, Apple has only itself to blamerevealed a ton of juicy details about the new phone. Now that everyone has had time to pore over the unofficially official details, it's clear that one of the most exciting revelations from the leak is the prospect of improved camera and video quality. 

As BGR reports, the iPhone 8 camera will be upgraded to support 4K video and shoot 60 frames per second on both the front- and rear-facing cameras. Currently, the iPhone 7 can shoot in 4K, but only from the rear-facing camera and at 30 frames per second. Meanwhile, the front-facing selfie camera shoots at a measley 1080p. So, start getting ready for more high-definition selfies.

But keep in mind that the iPhone can only reveal so much. If you were really hoping to enjoy all of that 4K video magic through your mobile screen, reel it in. Apparently, the camera and video quality upgrade won't exactly be detectable on your phone; the difference will be most easily detected on big screens. 

In addition, the iPhone will also include lossless compression, meaning you'll be able to shoot more photos and videos without having to worry about it taking up all your storage.

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Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks Debate Whether or Not Eminem’s Longtime Manager Can Save Def Jam on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's #EverydayStruggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska ran through the day of news, which included Paul Rosenberg's move to save Def Jam Records, Lil Yachty calling out the XXL cyphers, and French Montana not knowing who produced his biggest hit ever. Later, the crew dove into Akademiks' Twitch game before dissecting Lloyd Banks' career. To wrap, the gang ran through some quick hits before answering a bunch of fan tweets. 

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Conor McGregor Fires Back at Floyd Mayweather for Issuing Interesting Challenge to Him

On Tuesday night, just hours after a report emerged about how Conor McGregor’s recent sparring session with former world champion Paulie Malignaggi got “out of control,” Floyd Mayweather used his various social media accounts to issue a challenge of sorts to McGregor.

Originally, Mayweather and McGregor were both supposed to wear 10-ounce boxing gloves for their match on Aug. 26. That would, in theory, present some difficulties for McGregor, who is used to wearing 4-ounce gloves during UFC fights. But on Tuesday, Mayweather revealed that he would be willing to give McGregor an “advantage” by coming down slightly and wearing 8-ounce gloves in the ring. He also said that he’s open to doing whatever he has to in order to make McGregor feel “more comfortable” boxing so that the two fighters can “give the boxing and MMA fans what they want to see.” You can read his entire post here:

McGregor should have been thrilled with Mayweather’s decision to move from 10-ounce to 8-ounce gloves. Lighter gloves would allow him to rely on more of his power in the ring. But early Wednesday, McGregor fired back at Mayweather and said that he doesn’t care what size gloves they ultimately end up wearing. He also took aim at Mayweather’s “brittle hands” in a post he put up on Instagram and said he is “prepared to destroy” Mayweather when they fight:

The fact that Mayweather and McGregor are now going back-and-forth with one another over glove size might seem petty, but this was actually one of the bigger issues during the negotiations for the fight. Because McGregor is used to wearing lighter gloves in the UFC, he fought to have the gloves for the fight be as light as possible, while Mayweather argued that, if McGregor was going to step into his world, he should be prepared to do it in heavier gloves.

But despite what either fighter wants, it sounds like the Nevada Athletic Commission may have the final say as to what size gloves are used for the Mayweather/McGregor fight. According to ESPN, it’s likely that the commission will force the fighters to wear 10-ounce gloves during their match since that’s what they agreed to wear in their original contract for the fight. So all of the most recent trash talk between Mayweather and McGregor might not even matter in the grand scheme of things.

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Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks Discuss R. Kelly’s Alleged Sex Cult on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska discuss the rumor that R. Kelly is running a sex cult, if Puff Daddy's son Christian Combs has a shot at a successful rap career, and 50 Cent saying his new album will be dumbed down for the culture. They also break down Aaron Carter's recent DUI arrest, Tyga's new mixtape tracklist, and Kendrick Lamar doing a good deed for a fan.

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