Lil Yachty and Lil Pump Promise to Drop a Collaborative Tape Next Year

Lil Yachty and Lil Pump took to Twitter Sunday to announce something their devoted fanbases will definitely love: they have a tape together, and it sounds like it'll drop in the next few months. Plus, they could be touring together as well.

You can definitely trust the information since it comes directly from the source: Lil Yachty posted a screenshot of his and Lil Pump’s text conversations on his Twitter, adding that the project will be “first of the year, we promise.” Lil Yachty himself told Lil Pump that the tape needs to be released in January or February, after which the two would go on tour together. The conversation ended with Lil Pump’s iconic “eskitteeet!”

(And while we’re here peeping on Lil Yachty’s text messages, it looks like he has that extra long screenshot which suggest he already got his hands on the new iPhone X. Plus, he has a bunch of messages he should really be paying attention to.)

But that’s not all that Lil Yachty announced. He was full of promises today, in fact: he reminded his fans that Lil Boat 2 is still scheduled to drop the year. He's been teasing the project since August. “Another promise,” he wrote, really binding himself to his word publicly to his fans.

The two have previously collaborated, most recently on Lil Pump's track “Back” from his self-titled debut album, Lil Pump

Whatever you may think this joint project will sound like, it looks like the two rappers are determined to start the year releasing new music and performing for their fans. Love 'em or hate 'em, it doesn't sound like they're bothered (at least not Lil Pump, judging by a recent tweet.) They're here for the youth. 

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Lonzo Ball Becomes Youngest NBA Player to Notch a Triple-Double

Lakers guard Lonzo Ball messed around and got a triple-double Saturday night, and the much-hyped UCLA product made some history in the process. Early in the fourth quarter of a 98-90 loss to the Milwaukee Bucks, Ball grabbed his tenth rebound to go along with his 13 points and 11 assists. You can see Ball make history at the 2:23 mark in the video above.

At the age of 20 years, 15 days, Ball surpassed LeBron James as the youngest NBA player to record a triple double—the statistical achievement of reaching double figures in three statistical categories.

Former Lakers great and current Lakers President of Basketball Operations Magic Johnson, saw his share of triple doubles as a player and offered his rook some congratulations via Twitter.

“Congratulations to Lonzo @ZO2_ for becoming the youngest player in NBA history to record a triple double,” Johnson tweeted.

Given that the young Lakers took an L to drop their overall record to 5-8, Ball didn’t seem particularly impressed with his achievement.

“I really don't care,” Ball told reporters after the game. “We took a loss. It don’t really mean nothing.”

Earlier this summer, Ball became the first NBA rookie to get a triple-double during the Las Vegas Summer League.

The first 13 games of Ball’s professional career have been expectedly uneven, as Ball’s highlight reel assists have come with shooting woes and his brother LiAngelo being detained in China for a reported shoplifting charge. When speaking exclusively with Shams Charania of Yahoo’s The Vertical, Ball shrugged off his early season scoring struggles.

“I really don’t give a … I’ve played this way my whole life,” Ball told Charania. “In today’s NBA, a lot of point guards get buckets, but I go off my impact and what I can do to win games. It’s not going to be scoring every night, but I’m trying to improve that. The way I play, it comes from Dad. He really don’t care about noise either. My dad had me on lesser teams, so I had to do more and it prepares me.”

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Migos, Cardi B, and Nicki Minaj’s “MotorSport” Is Here

After months of relentless teasing, the first single from Migos' Culture II has finally landed. “MotorSport” premiered Friday morning on the Breakfast Club shortly after the hosts endured a peculiar conversation with the Hillsong Church guy, just hours after a preview of the track landed on YouTube. 

Migos also teased the new track during their performance at Power 105.1's Powerhouse at Barclays Thursday night.

 

A post shared by Power 105.1 (@power1051) on Oct 26, 2017 at 8:17pm PDT

Check the full version of the soon-to-be-everywhere collaboration, featuring Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, below via Spotify. Murda Beatz and CuBeatz provide production.

Though we still don't have a formal Culture II release date, the arrival of “MotorSport” means we should likely expect the project soon. Judging by Quavo's recent headline-spawning social media activity, the collection may include a variety of additional top-shelf collaborators.

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Donald Glover, Lil Yachty, Drake, Chance the Rapper, Ty Dolla Sign, Big Sean, Travis Scott, and Kanye West have all been either been seen in the studio with Quavo or heard in frustratingly brief clips of already completed collabs. Culture II also boasts a mystery executive producer, with many album hype theorists predicting their identity as being synonymous with 🐐.

 

A post shared by QuavoHuncho (@quavohuncho) on Oct 24, 2017 at 6:09pm PDT

Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, thankfully, also have new projects on the way. For Cardi B, the release will mark her debut studio album and arrives on the wave of hype cultivated by one of the best (and biggest songs) of 2017. 

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DJ Khaled and Asahd Khaled Show Off Their Sneaker Collections on Complex Closets

DJ Khaled is back to break the Internet once again with Joe La Puma for Complex Closets, and this time he brought his son Asahd along to show their now-shared sneaker collection and to celebrate his first birthday.

During the episode, Khaled gives another look at his sneaker closet, which now includes sneakers for his son, Asahd, who already owns exclusive Air Jordans. He gives an in-depth look at his own “Grateful” Air Jordan IIIs that Jordan Brand gave him to celebrate his album going platinum, and he explains that the first four pairs have a misspelling on them and are worth more money. Khaled also shows unreleased Air Jordans, such as the Air Jordan IIIs for Russell Westbrook, Drake’s University of Kentucky pack, the friends-and-family version of the Kaws x Air Jordan IV, the Air Jordan Vs for Mark Wahlberg, the “Denim” Air Jordan IIIs, and tells a touching story of how he received the Air Jordan 1s for Craig Sager. He also talks about Jay Z signing a pair of the Reebok S. Carters for him, responds to Lil Yachty wanting to battle his closet, and hints that Asahd might have his own Air Jordan sneaker on the way, all while giving more keys to life.

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Migos, Dave East, and More Share Songs That Should Replace the National Anthem at the 2017 BET Hip Hop Awards

The 2017 BET Hip Hop Awards took place this weekend in Miami and Complex News was on the green carpet to chop it up with DJ Khaled, Migos, Dave East, Lil Yachty, Plies, and more. Check the video up to hear those artists talk about everything from the awards show location to songs that bump harder than the national anthem. And yes, Migos are down to replace it with “Bad and Boujee.”

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A Recap of New York Fashion Week Spring 2018

After a week of some of the biggest brands, designers, and celebrities all showing out for New York Fashion Week Spring 2018, it's now time to take a look back at some highlights. During a time when many people are questioning the importance of New York Fashion Week in comparison to its European counterparts, designers delivered some signature moments to lighten the discrediting of the festivities, even if only briefly. Brands like Helmut Lang, Opening Ceremony, Kith, Fenty Puma by Rihanna, and Alexander Wang all brought their own signature aesthetic to their respective shows. Here is a recap of some of the most entertaining shows from New York Fashion Week.

Some of the biggest celebrity cameos of the week came at Ronnie Fieg's Kith Sport show. The designer's second fashion show took place on Thursday night at the Classic Car Club Manhattan, where he showed off upcoming collections with brands like Moncler, Adidas Soccer, Champion, Iceberg, and Nike. Virgil Abloh, Scott Disick, and Carmelo Anthony were among the crowd, but two of the most memorable guests appeared on the runway. First, NBA Hall of Famer Scottie Pippen walked down the catwalk sporting pieces from Fieg's upcoming Nike collaboration. If that wasn't enough, Fieg decided to close out the show by putting a spotlight (literally) onto arguably the best basketball player in the world, LeBron James, who lip-synched the lyrics to Kanye West and Jay Z's “H.A.M.” 

Kith Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Kith's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Randy Brooke/WireImage)

This past Saturday night, Alexander Wang took to Brooklyn to celebrate #WangFest. The mobile show included the likes of Bella Hadid and Kendall Jenner stepping out of an Alexander Wang tour bus before strutting down the Brooklyn streets. Their looks, complete with party style hats that read “WangFest,” further alluded to the show's party atmosphere. Notable attendants included Kim Kardashian West and Kris Jenner, amongst others. Of course, the after party that Wang has become known for did not disappoint either. Cardi B and Ja Rule hit the stage to perform, and Dunkin Donuts, Dominos, and Budweiser took care of the food and drinks for the affair. 

Alexander Wang Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Alexander Wang's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Gotham/GC Images)

Sunday night brought about even more festivities with Rihanna showing off her motocross and surf-inspired Spring 2018 Fenty line at the Park Avenue Armory. This was Rihanna's return to New York after her last two collections were debuted in Paris. Staying true to the theme, dirt bike riders tricked off of ramps over pink sand mountains to start the show. RiRi also took her bow on the back of a motorbike. The show boasted a star-studded front row that included Cardi B, Offset, Big Sean, and Jhené Aiko, to name a few.

Fenty Puma by Rihanna's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show
Fenty Puma by Rihanna's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Randy Brooke/WireImage)

Opening Ceremony decided to show off its Spring 2018 collection a little differently as well. Humberto Leon and Carol Lim debuted their collection using a dance performance titled “Changers,” which was written and directed by Spike Jonze. The collection itself featured plays on the collegiate wardrobe like varsity jackets, club T-shirts, sweatpants, and flannel shirts.

On Monday, Shane Oliver debuted his first collection for Helmut Lang at Pearl River Mart. The collection heavily referenced Lang's archive with a lot of pieces featuring fetish design, and leather accents as an added twist from Oliver. The former Hood By Air designer also included memorable head-turners—like an oversized bra that converts into a bag—in his collection. The ready-to-wear featured a line of Helmut Lang tour merch that featured red and white “HELMUT” branding throughout. ASAP Ferg, Ian Connor, Lil Yachty, Jerry Lorenzo, and more were among those who sat front row. 

Helmut Lang Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Helmut Lang's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Catwalking)

 

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How No Jumper’s Adam22 Became an Unlikely Rap Tastemaker

Adam Grandmaison aka Adam22 is a polarizing figure, as are many of the people he interviews. He's a lifelong BMX rider and fan who has become an influential part of conteporary rap culture with his DIY No Jumper video podcasts and vlogs. Based out of his OnSomeShit store on Melrose in Los Angeles, Adam sits down with rising artists for in-depth, unfiltered interviews that often end up feeling like a conversation between old friends.

“The only thing that I want to do in rap is to let up and coming people tell their story,” Adam says, and interviews with artists like Lil Yachty, Ugly God, XXXtentacion, Smokepurpp, Trippie Redd, and Action Bronson have racked up hundreds of millions of views. So how did a lifelong BMX fan in his mid-30s rack up hundreds of millions of views and gain the trust of so many rising rap stars?

We spent some time with him in Los Angeles to find out. Watch what went down above.

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New Report Exposes Alleged Concert Ticket Scheme Orchestrated by Fyre Festival Organizer

When reports started coming out about the doomed Fyre Festival, which was originally billed as a “luxury” music festival and advertised by the likes of Kendall Jenner and Bella Hadid and which promised performances from Pusha T, Desiigner, Lil Yachty, Blink-182, and more, it became clear the whole thing had sounded too good to be true.

Billy McFarland, one of the masterminds behind the catastrophic festival and the owner of Fyre Media, has been hit with several lawsuits, arrested and charged with fraud, and been forced to place Fyre Festival LLC under involuntary bankruptcy. But Fyre Media is not the only company McFarland owned. He is also the CEO of Magnises, a company he founded prior to Fyre Media, that functioned as a members-only concierge service. However, documents acquired by VICE News suggest McFarland has been mismanaging that company’s finances, too, by running what appeared to be a complicated concert ticket scheme.

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One of the benefits that Magnises offered its members was discounted concert and event tickets. But credit card records suggest that McFarland was buying the tickets from third-party distributors like Ticketmaster, StubHub, and Vivid Seats and then selling them to Magnises members at a significant loss.

Moreover, McFarland used a Fyre Media corporate credit card to pay for many of the Magnises tickets, effectively ensuring that both companies suffered similar financial woes even though they were entirely different entities. McFarland allegedly charged his Fyre Media American Express credit card for more than $1 million worth of tickets in just four months.

The records also show that other Fyre Media company credit cards were issued to at least nine employees including co-founder Ja Rule and Grant Margolin, the music festival’s marketing director. But the charges on those cards “appear reasonably related to the Fyre Media business,” according to VICE. It's the charges on McFarland’s card that raise the most eyebrows, since that’s where more than $1 million worth of Ticketmaster, StubHub, and Vivid Seats tickets were charged.

The problem for McFarland is that Fyre Media was conceived as an app for people to book artists for private events. It never claimed to sell tickets for concerts and events. Magnises did.

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Former employees and Magnises members claim that McFarland would advertise and sell tickets to events he did not already have tickets to. And when the event dates arrived, McFarland would either cancel the reservations or provide tickets purchased through third-party organizations.

For example, Magnises advertised tickets to a series of Adele concerts in September 2016. A former employee told VICE McFarland did not possess the tickets he advertised and the whole situation sounds like it was a total clusterfuck.

“What happened with Adele was that we found out that Billy wasn’t going through a source in Live Nation at all, because for that concert, there were no e-tickets available; the whole thing was all ticket stubs,” the anonymous former employee told VICE. “We had to go and meet with these brokers who act as third-party buyers around MSG. And we’re spending the whole time running around the city trying to get them together and figure out how many they have and who’s going to go in which section.”

What’s more, McFarland was apparently buying the tickets on the same day as the performances. McFarland’s credit card records show more than $150,000 worth of StubHub, Vivid Seats, Fan Exchange, and My Ticket Tracker charges on September 19, 20, 22, 23, 25 and 26, the exact days Adele was performing at Madison Square Garden. There were no ticket charges on September 21 and 24, when she did not perform.

A similar situation happened when Magnises offered members $250 tickets for Hamilton. McFarland’s Fyre Media American Express records have charges totaling almost $30,000 labeled with Vivid Seats and Hamilton. The cheapest transaction with this label is $1,401.30, which means McFarland was operating on at least a $1,200 loss per ticket for this Hamilton deal through Magnises.

Finally, McFarland’s company offered discounted floor tickets to Kanye West’s Saint Pablo Tour in June 2016 at $275 each, about $100 less than the median resale ticket price. As should be expected by now, McFarland’s credit card records show more than $10,000 worth of Ticketmaster charges on the first night the Saint Pablo Tour arrived in New York City, September 5, 2016, also at Madison Square Garden.

All of this appears as though it's going to make life even more difficult for McFarland. Outside of the headache he's dealing with due to the Fyre Festival issues, he's also going to have to explain why it appears he was running a ticket scheme in the months leading up to that debacle.

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The Who’s Who Of SoundCloud Rap

If a rapper without “lil” in their name drops a mixtape on SoundCloud and no one presses play, does it make a sound? That’s what it feels like keeping up with the massive onslaught of buzzing rappers, new mixtapes, and subgenres on top of microgenres in 2017.

Even with the continued relevance of the streaming service in hip-hop, SoundCloud has weathered a tough year. In early July, the streaming platform laid off 173 employees amid rumors the company only had enough capital to make it to the end of 2017. Chance the Rapper claimed he was going to save the day. Independent musicians panicked about what this meant for the future of distributing their music. Ultimately, SoundCloud announced it is here to stay, whatever that means.

On the intro to Lil Uzi Vert’s new album, Luv Is Rage 2, the Philadelphia rapper sent subliminals to a plethora of unnamed targets. The fact the diss could be referencing almost any SoundCloud rapper speaks to the nature of the platform and how fast influence disseminates. “Yes, I'm the one that really started all this/And you know I changed a lot of you niggas/In a matter of months, I raised a lot of you niggas,” raps Uzi on “Two®.”

Uzi isn’t wrong. SoundCloud is home to an entire nation of rappers with colored dreads, melodies inspired by 2000s emo and pop punk, and the latest mutations on Atlanta’s trap. A lot of the music is groundbreaking, much of it is not. What it means to be a SoundCloud rapper in 2017, is shifting and the ecosystem is rapidly changing. The term “SoundCloud Rap” has become a dismissive descriptor in the same way “Mumble Rap” has.

Despite this, the SoundCloud ecosystem is shifting. The platform is still massively influential, but Spotify with Rap Caviar and Apple with The A-List: Hip-Hop are leading the curated playlist era. Rappers that built their fan bases on SoundCloud, have largely started to phase out of the system that birthed them. Lil Uzi Vert is well on his way to having the number one album in the country. Problematic rappers like XXXTentacion are transitioning from millions of plays on SoundCloud to selling a rumored 65-70k in their first week. Princess Nokia is getting features in Vogue, performing to adoring fans at Afropunk, and re-releasing 2016’s 1992, after scrubbing it from SoundCloud. If anything SoundCloud’s biggest problem is keeping the stars they help birth from becoming more fuel to the engines of their competitors.

Below are some of the fastest rising artists currently dominating SoundCloud, many of whom are already on the cusp of jumping over the orange and white cloud.


  • Trippie Redd

    Trippie Redd sounds like pain. The 18-year-old, Canton, Ohio is, creatively, an extension of the melodic trap sensibility that Atlanta artists like Future and Young Thug have been perfecting for years. Trippie hails from the same city as Marilyn Manson, and his dark soundscapes seem plucked from similar hell pits. However, what separates Redd is his inimitable voice. The rapper’s reverb soaked vocals, warble, distort, and cascade over tracks. Seemingly endlessly versatile, he sometimes seems to do it all within the same moment.

    His biggest song to date is the devastating, psychedelic, “Love Scars.” “You used to say you in love/I used to say that shit back/Taking that shit from the heart/Now look where the fuck where we at,” Trippie raps over the Elliot Trent-produced fever dream. Trippie tends to stretch out the boundaries of his syllables like a never-ending echo, an effect that is exciting and haunting at the same time.

    The closest comparison lobbed at Trippie is undoubtedly Lil Uzi Vert. To be fair, Trippie’s vocals can dip into some of the same territory as Vert's staked out for himself. Regardless, it's unfair to lump the two together considering how raw and unrestrained Redd is willing to get with his performances.


  • Kodie Shane

    Kodie Shane is easily the most talented member of Lil Yachty’s Sailing Team. Her ear for melodies and talent to execute them separates her from most rappers in her weight class. Kodie is like a sentient piece of bubblegum on songs like “Hold Up”— which features Lil Uzi Vert and Lil Yachty. Where her male counterparts' processed vocals can often grate on one’s ears, Shane has a knack for making her performances cut through to your heart. In an interview with Complex News, Kodie discusses her penchant to compete with male artists. “I definitely hope that I’m inspiring a lot of different female artists to run with the boys,” says Shane. “I say that’s what I’m doing. I run with the boys.”

    Sad” is likely the best example of her displaying that mindset. If you were listening without knowing any of the rappers on the track, Shane stands out as the bigger star, despite the fact that she shares the bill with her Sailing Team leader Lil Yachty. A lyric like “I just want to be sad” is genius in its simplicity, and across the song she keeps up the penchant for directedness.

    Don’t sleep on Shane’s latest EP, Back From the Future. Throw on “Indecisive,” and you’ll be singing, “I feel like Cam’ron back in 06,” for the rest of 2017.


  • Lil Peep

    In 2007, My Chemical Romance lead singer Gerard Way released The Umbrella Academy. The comic book was illustrated by Gabriel Bá, and re-wrote everything my 14-year-old brain thought about comics. It was inventive, experimental, and not easily classified.

    Listening to Lil Peep reminds me of reading The Umbrella Academy. That isn’t to say his music is good, but it's often enthralling. Peep is an emo artist with trap influences. Lyrics on his biggest songs “Gym Class,” read as if they belong in a big budget reboot of a John Hughes movie. “Now I’m faded on my own in my bedroom/Now I’m lookin' at my phone should I text you?/I don't wanna sext you, I don't wanna bless you/Baby I'm a priest in the underworld, Guess who,” raps Peep over a plodding and atmospheric Brobak-produced song.

    In early August, Peep released his debut album, Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 1. Songs like “Better Off (Dying)” and “Save That Shit” confirmed what many had long suspected: Peep’s use of melody was pushing him farther into the rock genre and farther from the rapping that got him here. Such is the life of a white rapper in 2017.


  • Rico Nasty

    If the world is fair and just place (it isn't), the success of Cardi B and her song “Bodak Yellow” will spark a trend. The number 3 song in the country didn’t have to go pop to pop. Rico Nasty doesn’t make music like Cardi, but she does have the same sense of joyful idiosyncrasy, and force of personality could set her apart from the pack.

    Most know the DMV rapper from her song “Hey Arnold,” which Lil Yachty would inevitably jump on after its release. But her music is so much more than that. Crisp and concise, Tales of Tacobella is one of the best projects of 2017. “Block List” is Rico’s catchiest and most undeniable song to date. “Do What It Do” is my personal favorite. However, her latest song Poppin’” is a blistering diss supposedly aimed at another female rapper, Bali Baby. “I'm a poppin' ass bitch let me remind ya/Don't hide, I can always come and find ya/Ain't no bitch in me bitch, come proper,” spits Rico over a stuttering, majestic beat. With the right push, the song and the story behind it have the potential to go viral.


  • Lil Pump

    Lil Pump must be great at mad libs. The secret to the South Florida rapper’s undeniable formula is simple: Pick a name out of a hat, compare said name to how rich and successful you are, and rap it over a booming beat. Here is the chorus to Lil Pump’s “D Rose,” “100 on my wrist, 80 on my wrist/D Rose, D Rose, D Rose, D Rose.” For comparison here is the hook to the song “Boss,” “Yeah, I came in with the sauce, ooh/Yeah, I came in with a saw, ooh/Bitch, I flex, Rick Ross, yeah/Bitch, I flex, Rick Ross, yeah.” On “Lil Pump” he flips the script, monotonously saying his name over and over again like a mystic chant.

    It is hard to tell how serious the pink and blonde-dreaded rapper is on any given song. This is potentially why people love and hate Pump in equal measure. The Florida teen isn’t re-inventing the rap wheel, but to expect him to is missing the point. He’s mastered the art of repetition and name association, and is undeniably charismatic on the mic. For now, that is enough for most.


  • Asian Doll

    If there was a rapper I wouldn’t cross based solely off their delivery it would be Asian Doll. “Real Bitch Anthem” is almost four minutes of Doll aggressively throwing barbs, shade, and lyrical projectiles in every direction. Want to feel like a broke boy by association? Let some of Doll’s iciest daggers slit your soul. “You ain't a real nigga stunting in your homies shoes/You got a penthouse, with bout six dudes/All your crack cards scamming to you out the loot,” spits Doll like she wants to ensure you’ll never want to get on her bad side.

    Asian Doll’s biggest song to date is “Poppin,” featuring PnB Rock and produced by frequent Lil Uzi Vert collaborator Maaly Raw. The most amazing part of the song is Doll’s one and only verse. Even when her voice is overtly processed her lyrical hostility still bleeds through.


  • Tay-K

    It's hard to tell if Tay-K is a SoundCloud rapper in the traditional sense, or if the viral nature of his existence has been a boon across anything and everything associated with his name. The 17-year-old Texas rapper is infamous for his song “The Race,” and the backstory that propelled it to one of the most intriguing, but ultimately sad songs of the year.

    According to the New York Times Tay-K has, “been charged, along with six others, in connection with a home invasion that left a 21-year-old man dead in July 2016, when Tay-K was 16; Tay-K had been released from custody pending the hearing and was wearing an ankle monitor.” Tay-K would end up cutting off his ankle bracelet and going on the run after being faced with the threat of being tried as an adult on capital murder charges. His hit song, “The Race,” dropped the same day he was apprehended in Elizabeth, NJ. His legendary status was solidified.

    “The Race” is currently number 12 on the SoundCloud Top 50, number 52 on the Billboard Hot 100, and home to over 30 million views on YouTube. Remixes have flooded SoundCloud.

    The whirlwind surrounding Tay-K obscures the fact that he has a knack for the type of aggressive songs that launched Chief Keef into the national consciousness. Songs like “Mega Man” and “Murder She Wrote” have the same intangible quality that makes “The Race,” so enthralling. If Tay-K can avoid jail time, he will have a promising rap career ahead of him.


  • Ski Mask The Slump God

    Ski Mask the Slump God has the number 2 song on the SoundCloud Top 50. That in and of itself isn’t surprising. The majority of the Ski Mask’s songs have millions of plays. However, Ski deciding to rip the Timbaland-produced instrumental for the 1999 Missy Elliot song, “She’s a Bitch,” and turn it into a hit of his own is a stroke of bizarre genius.

    To say Ski demolished the beat would be a massive understatement.“Naruto nine-tailed fox coat fur/I feel like a Gucci ad-lib, burr!/Colder than Coca-Cola mascot, polar bear,” is one of the coldest openings to a verse in recent memory. The reception to the track was so positive, Missy herself sent out a tweet. “Oh he rode the heck out of this Fiyah,” wrote Missy with a deluge of fire emojis.

    Write off Ski as just another “SoundCloud Rapper” at your own peril. His rapid fire flow on songs like, “Take a Step Back,” is reminiscent of a Busta Rhymes a few dimensions removed from our earthly plane. We can only hope that tracks like the “Get Your Freak On”-sampling, A$AP Ferg assisted-“ILoveYourAuntie” on deck will get Timbaland to bless Ski Mask by producing an entire project.


  • Molly Brazy

    Spend enough time listening to female rappers on SoundCloud and a common trend emerges. While their male counterparts are obsessed with emulating the freewheeling experimentation of modern Atlanta, women on the streaming platform are generally more concerned with proving their skills lyrically. Molly Brazy is a Detroit rapper with a rapid, violent flow that never strays far from abrasive.

    Her song “Outro,” is as combative as it is infectious. There is no singing, no vocal manipulation, or intergalactic beats. Instead, Brazy rides over the Bay Area-influenced instrumental, spitting lines like, “Riding in the foreign say he like the way I snap it/Bitches panic when they see me load the semi automatic.”


  • Smokepurpp

    It’s hard to pinpoint what type of rapper Smokepurpp wants to be. If there was a game of “build-a-SoundCloud-rapper,” the 19-year-old Florida would already possess the propensity for catchy adlibs of Playboi Cardi and the auto-tune gargling of Lil Yachty. “To the Moon” isn’t his biggest song, but it easily one of his most creatively expansive. Nightmarish and psychedelic, it is what I imagine Kid Cudi’s 2008 song “Man on the Moon” would sound like if it was made in 2017.

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Lil Yachty Goes Sneaker Shopping

Platinum-selling artist Lil Yachty is one of the most positive and stylish rappers in the game right now, and he met up with Joe La Puma at Flight Club in Los Angeles for the latest episode of Complex's Sneaker Shopping. In the episode, Yachty talks about the sneakers he wanted growing up and how Reebok offered him his own sneaker collaboration.

Yachty admits that he didn't have a lot of sneakers growing up, and his first pair of “cool” shoes ended up being a pair of fake Air Jordan VIIs. He also talks about how he didn't want the Nike Air More Uptempos until Supreme did a collaboration on them and confesses that he was a total hypebeast for the sneakers. During the shoot, Yachty talks about wanting the Nike Mags as a teenager and says he finally bought a pair for $14,000. He goes on to talk about Big Baller Brand, compares his collection to DJ Khaled's, and talks his Sprite commercial with LeBron James. In the end, he spends over $2,100 on Air Jordans and Nike SB Dunks.

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