Don’t Fall for These Disgusting Hoaxes Being Spread About Las Vegas Massacre

A domestic terrorist shot and killed at least 58 people and injured 515 others during the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas, Nevada Sunday night. The shooter, later identified by police as 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, reportedly killed himself before authorities entered his room at the nearby Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

While the only nation where this regularly happens waits on our politicians to provide thoughts and prayers but no real solutions, some have taken up the tasteless task of intentionally spreading Vegas-related hoaxes purely for retweets.

On Twitter, a place whose founders are more concerned with giving us 280 fucking characters instead of shutting down shit like this, multiple far-right troll accounts have—once again—attempted to circulate images of comedian Sam Hyde:

Hyde, of course, is not the shooter and is in no way connected to the attack. As BuzzFeed's Ryan Broderick explained in his report Monday, Hyde is a frequent target of similar hoaxes in the wake of U.S. mass shootings, of which there are many.

Additionally, fabricated retweet requests alleging missing family members have also started popping up in the wake of the Vegas attack.

The operator of the @immyxrx account, who shared the first photo embedded above, told Mashable he intentionally spread misinformation (using a photo of porn star Johnny Sins) “for the retweets.” The account's profile picture was taken from YouTube product reviewer TheReportOfTheWeek, whose photos have been unwillingly used in previous post-shooting misinformation campaigns. The photo used by @cryinginside247, meanwhile, has been confirmed by the original poster to be a fabrication. The photo used in @pumaexiliado's tweet appears to have been taken from a report on a murder case in Mexico.

Additional hoaxes were reported but have since been removed, including one about Arsenal player Mesut Özil. At least one Twitter account has been temporarily restricted.

4chan trolls—who have created threads calling for the “control” of the narrative surrounding the Vegas shooting—have also started spreading additional claims, as Broderick reported early Monday.

Authorities are still investigating Sunday's shooting, which has already been declared the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

So who's to blame for the ease with which these hoaxes are able to spread? Twitter? Alex Jones cult members? Sheer idiocy? All of the above, really. And as we in America delve deeper and deeper into the post-truth era following the alleged election of someone who rarely goes 24 hours without spreading hate, lies, or both, we must remain vigilant.

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O.J. Simpson Expected to Be Released From Prison Very Soon

Back in July, O.J. Simpson was granted parole during a highly-publicized hearing in Nevada. But immediately after finding out his fate, he was ordered back behind bars to await his release, which caused a lot of the buzz surrounding him to die down.

That buzz is about to get ratcheted all the way back up in the coming days, though, as it appears Simpson is on the verge of being released back into society. According to a Nevada prisons official who spoke with the Associated Press on Wednesday, Simpson could be released from the Lovelock Correctional Center as early as Monday. He has been at the facility for nine years now serving out a sentence stemming from an armed robbery conviction.

Before he’s released from custody, Simpson will actually be moved from Lovelock to High Desert State Prison just outside of Las Vegas, according to Nevada Department of Corrections spokeswoman Brooke Keast. He will then be allowed to leave that facility as a free man at some point, though prison officials are keeping the actual date and time of his release under wraps in an effort to avoid drawing media attention to the prison.

Simpson’s close friend Tom Scotto spoke with the AP and confirmed that Simpson will be released “shortly after” Oct. 1, but he declined to be any more specific than that. Once Simpson is freed, it’s unclear where he will go to live, but he's likely going to end up living somewhere in Florida.

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Ice Cube’s Big3 Files Defamation Countersuit Against Champions Basketball League

After the fledgling Champions Basketball League filed a $250 million lawsuit against the competing Big3 league for allegedly “poaching players and proprietary ideas,” the Big3 has fired back with its own legal action. The semi-pro, three-on-three league founded by Ice Cube and Jeff Kwatinetz filed a defamation lawsuit against the CBL Friday.

The friction appears to stem from participating players’ ability to play in both leagues, among other issues. In the original CBL suit, league officials claimed the Big3 defrauded them because players who participated in Big3 games were not allowed to also play in the CBL. The CBL alleged they were not allowed to start the season on time because players who previously agreed to play in both leagues were not allowed to do so by the Big3.

In a copy of the suit obtained by Deadspin, lawyers for the Big3 take issue with both the allegation of an agreement between the two leagues and Champions Basketball League CEO Carl George.

“In fact (1) there was never any agreement between the Big3 and the Champions League,” the suit reads in part. “The approximately three players who informed the Big3 of a prior dealing with the Champions League were permitted through an express provision in their contracts to have a non-exclusive relationship with the Big3.”

On August 26, the Big3 held an inaugural championship game in Las Vegas. At press time, the Champions Basketball League had yet again postponed a nebulous, projected launch date of the “summer of 2016.”

While the nuts and bolts of proving actual malice to a jury isn’t the most riveting read, the suit does reveal some potential news about the ever-growing crossover of sports and music.

The countersuit claims Champions League CEO George Carl wrote a letter to an unnamed recording artist claiming Snoop Dogg was the official CBL “celebrity commish,” and stars such as DJ Khaled, Floyd Mayweather and Tom Brady were directly affiliated with the league in some capacity.

You can view the entire lawsuit and read the full report at Deadspin

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Watch the “Complex Live” Mayweather-McGregor Fight Recap Special from Las Vegas

“Complex Live” is in Las Vegas this week to recap the Mayweather-McGregor fight, with plenty of interviews and more.

The ‘Money Belt’ Designed for the Mayweather/McGregor Winner Is So Ridiculous

The winner of the Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor superfight on Saturday night won’t get a real title. But that doesn’t mean that there won’t be something on the line. Outside of fighting for pride (not to mention millions and millions and millions of dollars), Mayweather and McGregor will also be fighting for what is being called “The Money Belt.”

Even though the so-called Money Belt won’t be tied to an actual World Boxing Council championship, the WBC unveiled the prize that they created for the Mayweather/McGregor fight on Wednesday during a press conference for the bout. WBC president Mauricio Sulaiman showed off the belt for the first time at the event in Las Vegas, and it’s every bit as ridiculously over the top as you would expect it to be.

It’s unclear how much the Money Belt is actually worth, but it has a bunch of features that would suggest that it has to be worth a pretty penny. The belt includes 3,360 diamonds, 600 sapphires, 300 emeralds, and 1.5 kilograms of 24-karat gold, and all of that is positioned on green Italian alligator leather. It’s actually sort of similar to a belt the WBC created specifically for Mayweather’s fight with Manny Pacquiao back in 2015, but this one manages to top that one in terms of overall gaudiness.

Social media obviously had some strong reactions to the belt. Some people love the fact that the WBC went all out when designing the belt, while others can’t believe how insane the belt is. But the best reactions came from those who compared the Money Belt to another over the top belt—the Million Dollar Championship that was created for WWE star “The Million Dollar Man” Ted DiBiase back in the late 1980s.

In less than 72 hours, we’ll finally find out whether Mayweather or McGregor will ultimately take this belt home.

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UFC President Dana White Posts Video of Conor McGregor Knocking Down Paul Malignaggi in the Ring

Amid concerns over Conor McGregor's ability to survive in the ring against Floyd Mayweather, UFC president Dana White released two videos from McGregor's sparring sessions with Paul Malignaggi. On Friday, The Notorious held an open workout at UFC headquarters in Las Vegas where he put some odd training techniques and slow heavy bag speed on display for those in attendance. 

White also responded to the people doubting McGregor's boxing skills by posting two videos of The Notorious sparring with Malignaggi, including a clip where it appears Conor knocked down the former world champion. 

Earlier this month, Malignaggi abruptly quit as McGregor's sparring partner after photos from their session leaked. The former boxer claims he was pushed in the photo showing him lying on the mat with Conor standing over him.

The circus leading up to this fight is nearly coming to a close. Mayweather and McGregor will finally meet in the ring on Aug. 26.

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Mayweather Promotions CEO Disputes Reports About Ticket Sales for Mayweather/McGregor Fight

In late July, a report came out indicating that ticket sales for the Aug. 26 fight between Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas weren’t exactly going according to plan. Many people expected the fight to sell out rather quickly, but according to the report, there were still thousands of tickets available for it, which seemed to suggest that the promoters for the fight might have issues getting top dollar for them.

But Mayweather Promotions CEO Leonard Ellerbe spoke out about the reported slow ticket sales for the fight on Thursday during Mayweather’s open media session at his gym in Las Vegas, and he said that he’s not worried at all. Contrary to what has been reported, Ellerbe said that the fight is currently on pace to break the record for the highest boxing gate ever.

“Right now, we have over $60 million in the box office,” Ellerbe said. “And you tell me, what part of that remotely looks like ticket sales are slow. This isn’t a damn Rolling Stones concert. That’s the only thing that sells out in seconds. When you are talking about tickets going from $500 to $10,000, that’s an expensive ticket. So you have every CEO from every major company. You know, guys, it takes time to plan and get it together.”

Ellerbe also talked about some of the VIPs who have expressed interest in attending the fight:

Additionally, Mayweather echoed what Ellerbe told reporters before his workout on Thursday and said that he believes his fight with McGregor is ultimately going to sell out as we move closer to fight night. Mayweather is also doing his part to continue to promote the fight. Here he is interrupting a live shot on ESPN’s SportsCenter on Thursday to tell people to watch the fight:

ESPN is reporting that, if you want a ticket, they’re not difficult to find right now. There are reportedly still thousands of them available on the Ticketmaster website, and there are also plenty of them available through ticket resale sites like Vivid Seats and StubHub. They’re not cheap, though. Vivid Seats, for example, is reporting that the average ticket sold on its site is going for more than $3,600.

To set a new record for a boxing gate, the Mayweather/McGregor fight would need to eclipse the $72.2 million mark. That’s how much money Mayweather’s fight against Manny Pacquiao brought in back in May 2015.

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Everything That Went Down at Adidas’ LVL3 Event With James Harden and Damian Lillard

Looking out at the future of NBA basketball, it's clear that Adidas is setting itself up to win the long-game. With young superstars like James Harden, Damian Lillard, Kristaps Porzingis, Andrew Wiggins, and Brandon Ingram on the Adidas roster, the future looks bright for their growing basketball brand. They're loaded with talent. But we had to see it for ourselves, and in action too.

Complex's Speedy Morman hit up the Adidas LVL3 event in Las Vegas, Nevada to see how the brand's permeating basketball and hip-hop culture. In between interviews with the likes of Harden, Lillard, and Ingram, Speedy got caught up on the latest in Adidas basketball technology, and saw DJ Esco perform and host a dunk contest. Check out the video above. 

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Here’s the Story Behind That Big-Ass CN Tower Replica Drake Had at OVO Fest

On Monday, August 7, during the eight annual OVO Fest, Drake performed on a big-ass replica of the CN Tower in order to recreate the cover of his album Views. To give you a sense of the scale of this impressive duplicate, here are a few pictures from his Instagram:

 

You don't know…what's in store…

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on Aug 8, 2017 at 9:42pm PDT

 

Building a ladder of love to you…and I hope that love you built one too

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on Aug 8, 2017 at 2:14am PDT

 

6 God and I live up to my name

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on Aug 8, 2017 at 2:49pm PDT

Damn.

Drake told the crowd that he asked “19 companies” to construct the copy, and was declined by every single one. Look at those pics again and tell us that's not reasonable. However, his request was finally accepted by a man named Eric Pearce, who owns a company called Las Vegas' Show Group Production Services, which had previously handled production orders from Justin Bieber, Guns N' Roses, and Roger Waters.

According to CBC News, Pearce and his crew had roughly three weeks to assemble the structure and then move it more than 2,000 miles to the Budweiser Stage in Toronto. They were able to do this by first planning on how to construct it in a single weekend, and then by working on it 24 hours per day, seven days a week. “We didn't have time to make any models,” Pearce said. “We simply looked at photographs.” Additionally, members of Drake's team (who themselves were led by production design firm GP-SK Design) gave insights, imagery, and scaled references of the 1,815 foot tall tower.

Pearce, who understandably called the task “very difficult,” says that a replica of that magnitude would traditionally take more than twice as long—six to eight weeks—to complete. As the CBC reports, the final product filled up almost all of the stage, and even included the observation deck's EdgeWalk trolley equipment. Pearce added that the prop was “two or three times the traditional rock and roll star set.”

After it was completed in its factory in Vegas, it was tested, since it likely would've been very bad for business if the set collapsed and killed Drake. It was then packed onto five tractor trailers and driven across the U.S. to Canada. While the cargo was a secret, Pearce also said there really wasn't much time for word to get out.

When the set finally did make it to the stage, it was constructed under the supervision of Pearce's guys, who had been sent from Nevada. Now that the show is over and the replica has served its purpose, it's heading back to Vegas so it can sit in storage. Pearce also didn't divulge how much it costs, or give his two cents on whether or not it was worth it to concoct such a gargantuan pain in the ass model for such a brief usage.

But if you need a big replica of a landmark, and you need it done quickly, you now know who to turn to.

Seems like a practical bit of information to have.

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Why Conor McGregor Doesn’t Stand a Chance Against Floyd Mayweather

Ask those around boxing if Mayweather-McGregor is good for the sport and they’ll give you different answers.

Some think it’s great. Others think it’s nothing more than a farce that only a sucker would pay $100 on Pay-Per-View to watch.

But the one thing those closely associated with boxing can almost universally agree on is the idea that Conor McGregor, the MMA superstar who will challenge an undefeated Floyd Mayweather Aug. 26 in Las Vegas, has almost no chance of winning.

To them, it’s not a matter of if Mayweather will win, but rather how.

“If [Mayweather] wants to stop it in the first round, he can stop it in the first round,” four-division champion Adrien Broner told us last month.

McGregor is stepping onto Mayweather’s turf and agreeing to box him under very specific terms, so the list of reasons why so many in the sport refuse to give McGregor a realistic shot to hand Mayweather his first professional loss is long. And often extremely specific.

While McGregor and Mayweather circled each other for years before making the fight official in June, McGregor’s only been seriously training as a boxer for a few months. And from what we’ve seen on social media and heard from the mouth of his sparring partner Paulie Malinaggi, the results haven’t been particularly impressive.

The idea that a novice to the sweet science and all its nuances can just step into the ring and take down the legendary Mayweather, considered to be the best modern-day defensive boxer and among the all-time greats, is almost impossible to fathom.  

“When the bell ring nobody knows that squared circle like me. I know angles. I know where to touch you at. I know what you do good. I know what you don’t like. And I don’t have to watch tapes. That’s something I’m blessed with.” — FLOYD MAYWEATHER

“Not an insult, but there are C-class fighters in my business that I know would handle [McGregor] easily,” says ESPN boxing analyst Teddy Atlas. “This is the lowest level fighter [Floyd’s] probably ever fought. I’m not trying to insult MMA guys or McGregor. I think McGregor’s a genius. But at the end of the day this is not an elite athletic contest that some people want to believe it is.”

It’s the simple things, many point out, that will likely doom McGregor. Jermall Charlo, who awaits his shot at the winner of the Gennady Golovkin-Canelo Alvarez fight in September, is not the most neutral of observers considering his ties to Mayweather Promotions. But speaking from a strictly analytical perspective, the 28-year-old rising star thinks McGregor’s footwork will cross him up.

““I don’t think technically McGregor stands a chance,” says Charlo, one of boxing's top middleweight contenders. “He's going to trip over his feet more than he’s going to get in shots. He’s going to be all sloppy all over the ring and hopefully he don’t get frustrated to throw an elbow or kick in there and get disqualified.”

Reportedly there are financial reasons outlined in the contract as to why it would be in McGregor’s best interest to not do that. But how much will McGregor, who has been programmed to punch, kick, grapple, and violently force his opponents to submit, be forced to suppress those natural instincts? And how will he adjust to fighting 12 rounds, three minutes at a time? McGregor’s used to fighting fewer rounds and much briefer segments.

“The reason Conor shouldn’t have a chance is he’s not a professional fighter,” says Atlas. “He’s never competed at this realm. He does it in segments, but not for 12 rounds. Mayweather does it for an eternity.”

Those who think McGregor has a chance, or believe he will win, point to the age difference, size difference, and his impressive punching power. But Atlas, having studied McGregor, thinks the x-factor will be the altered persona McGregor carries into the ring. 

conor mcgregor presser with floyd mayweather
Image via USA Today Sports/Steve Flynn

The first two-division champion in UFC history has, according to Atlas, won by playing it conservatively. The way Mayweather has played defense and expertly waited for his opponents to open themselves up to a counter is the same strategy McGregor has expertly deployed. Against Maywether, he’ll have to be the aggressor.

“McGregor is going to put his fangs out and he’s going to sink them into Floyd. Guess what? He’s not that guy,” says Atlas. “The funny thing is he’s more similar to Floyd than he is to the guy they’re promoting. His mentality is to be careful. I did my homework. His biggest wins are off the counter, being intelligent, being careful, being conservative, being Floyd!”

Whether Mayweather, at age 40, has enough power in his fists to knockout McGregor remains to be seen. Many think Mayweather will simply outlast McGregor over 12 rounds to capture an easy decision. With his 49-0 record on the line and massive expectations riding on him, Mayweather has a lot more to lose than McGregor. But in typical Floyd “Money” Mayweather fashion, he's not particularly worried.

“He can come at me different ways, it’s not going to work,” Mayweather said after the July 13th press conference at Barclays Center. “When a guy is across from me, you know what he has to say to himself? ‘Damn, I’m fighting Floyd Mayweather.’ When the bell ring nobody knows that squared circle like me. I know angles. I know where to touch you at. I know what you do good. I know what you don’t like. And I don’t have to watch tapes. That’s something I’m blessed with.” 

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