“Complex Live” Links Up With Belly, Damian Marley, Kodie Shane and Combat Jack

The latest “Complex Live” features Belly, Damian Marley, Kodie Shane and Combat Jack.

People Are Signing a Petition for Quavo to Be Featured on the National Anthem

“The Star-Spangled Banner,” for whatever reason, is the national anthem of the Divided States of America. No offense to anyone into American flag t-shirts and Toby Keith and whatnot, but the song is seriously one of the most boring compositions in music history. In fact, I like to sneak in a quick mini-nap whenever someone insists upon covering it in public.

At least one bold individual, a Kentucky man by the name of Sean Gray, has decided to lead the fight for an improved national anthem by starting a completely reasonable petition. “It's the current year, 2017, and I think the nation should get with the times and feature Quavo on the National Anthem,” Gray writes on his Change.org petition. “He's a feature on everything else, so why not?”

Signees have provided a multitude of reasons for supporting the petition, ranging from “nut” to “Alex told me to” to “Fuck Donald Trump.” Valid causes, all. At the time of this writing, the petition was less than 500 signatures away from its goal of 1,500 supporters after gaining traction with features in a variety of publications, including HotNewHipHop.

In a perfect world, which is quite clearly not the world we're living in now, this petition would immediately be sent to a Trumpless White House and/or whoever's in charge of updating the nation's anthem. After no debate whatsoever, a new national anthem would be commissioned featuring Quavo, Travis Scott, Selena Gomez, and SZA over a track of John Mayer doing some of his finest John Mayering with Travis Barker on drums. Production, ideally, would be handled by Metro Boomin and Mike Will Made-It.

Make it happen, America.

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Kobe Bryant’s Air Jordan III PEs Sell for More Than $30,000

Kobe Bryant’s highly coveted Air Jordan III PEs recently raked in a hefty sum on eBay.

As pointed out by Nice Kicks, the sneakers were auctioned off earlier this week to an unidentified buyer for $30,400. The exclusives were gifted to Kobe during the 2002-2003 NBA season, when he was playing as a sneaker free agent. At the time, many people believed he was on his way to sign with Jordan Brand, but because he ultimately inked a deal with Nike, Kobe’s Air Jordan III PEs never received a wide release. Though they were expected to appear in a limited Air Jordan pack along with the PE VIIIs, fans are still holding their breath for that drop. 

The sample “Home White” pair came in Kobe’s size 14 and included the production date of 11/26/2002 on the tongue tag. According to the listing, the sneakers had never been worn, but had typical signs of aging. You can check out the IIIs in the images above and below. 

The 'Kobe' Air Jordan 3
Image via eBay

 

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Kodie Shane on Working in a Male-Dominated Industry: ‘I Run With the Boys So It Doesn’t Really Intimidate Me’

Kodie Shane came out the gate strong with Zero Gravity and Big Trouble Little Jupiter, and she has no plans of slowing down. Complex's own Beija spent some time with the rising act to hear about her journey and what she has in store for her fans.

Shane broke down how she linked with Lil Yachty and the Sailing Team, and shared what it's like to work in a male-dominated industry: “I run with the boys so it doesn't really intimidate me.”

She also clarified she's more of a “yeah” rapper, but has some bars lined up for those who underestimate her rap skills.

Check out the full interview with Shane above, where she talks about wanting to star in a CoverGirl commercial and her dream collaboration with Frank Ocean. You can catch her on Yachty's Teenage Tour later this month.

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Why Conor McGregor Doesn’t Stand a Chance Against Floyd Mayweather

Ask those around boxing if Mayweather-McGregor is good for the sport and they’ll give you different answers.

Some think it’s great. Others think it’s nothing more than a farce that only a sucker would pay $100 on Pay-Per-View to watch.

But the one thing those closely associated with boxing can almost universally agree on is the idea that Conor McGregor, the MMA superstar who will challenge an undefeated Floyd Mayweather Aug. 26 in Las Vegas, has almost no chance of winning.

To them, it’s not a matter of if Mayweather will win, but rather how.

“If [Mayweather] wants to stop it in the first round, he can stop it in the first round,” four-division champion Adrien Broner told us last month.

McGregor is stepping onto Mayweather’s turf and agreeing to box him under very specific terms, so the list of reasons why so many in the sport refuse to give McGregor a realistic shot to hand Mayweather his first professional loss is long. And often extremely specific.

While McGregor and Mayweather circled each other for years before making the fight official in June, McGregor’s only been seriously training as a boxer for a few months. And from what we’ve seen on social media and heard from the mouth of his sparring partner Paulie Malinaggi, the results haven’t been particularly impressive.

The idea that a novice to the sweet science and all its nuances can just step into the ring and take down the legendary Mayweather, considered to be the best modern-day defensive boxer and among the all-time greats, is almost impossible to fathom.  

“When the bell ring nobody knows that squared circle like me. I know angles. I know where to touch you at. I know what you do good. I know what you don’t like. And I don’t have to watch tapes. That’s something I’m blessed with.” — FLOYD MAYWEATHER

“Not an insult, but there are C-class fighters in my business that I know would handle [McGregor] easily,” says ESPN boxing analyst Teddy Atlas. “This is the lowest level fighter [Floyd’s] probably ever fought. I’m not trying to insult MMA guys or McGregor. I think McGregor’s a genius. But at the end of the day this is not an elite athletic contest that some people want to believe it is.”

It’s the simple things, many point out, that will likely doom McGregor. Jermall Charlo, who awaits his shot at the winner of the Gennady Golovkin-Canelo Alvarez fight in September, is not the most neutral of observers considering his ties to Mayweather Promotions. But speaking from a strictly analytical perspective, the 28-year-old rising star thinks McGregor’s footwork will cross him up.

““I don’t think technically McGregor stands a chance,” says Charlo, one of boxing's top middleweight contenders. “He's going to trip over his feet more than he’s going to get in shots. He’s going to be all sloppy all over the ring and hopefully he don’t get frustrated to throw an elbow or kick in there and get disqualified.”

Reportedly there are financial reasons outlined in the contract as to why it would be in McGregor’s best interest to not do that. But how much will McGregor, who has been programmed to punch, kick, grapple, and violently force his opponents to submit, be forced to suppress those natural instincts? And how will he adjust to fighting 12 rounds, three minutes at a time? McGregor’s used to fighting fewer rounds and much briefer segments.

“The reason Conor shouldn’t have a chance is he’s not a professional fighter,” says Atlas. “He’s never competed at this realm. He does it in segments, but not for 12 rounds. Mayweather does it for an eternity.”

Those who think McGregor has a chance, or believe he will win, point to the age difference, size difference, and his impressive punching power. But Atlas, having studied McGregor, thinks the x-factor will be the altered persona McGregor carries into the ring. 

conor mcgregor presser with floyd mayweather
Image via USA Today Sports/Steve Flynn

The first two-division champion in UFC history has, according to Atlas, won by playing it conservatively. The way Mayweather has played defense and expertly waited for his opponents to open themselves up to a counter is the same strategy McGregor has expertly deployed. Against Maywether, he’ll have to be the aggressor.

“McGregor is going to put his fangs out and he’s going to sink them into Floyd. Guess what? He’s not that guy,” says Atlas. “The funny thing is he’s more similar to Floyd than he is to the guy they’re promoting. His mentality is to be careful. I did my homework. His biggest wins are off the counter, being intelligent, being careful, being conservative, being Floyd!”

Whether Mayweather, at age 40, has enough power in his fists to knockout McGregor remains to be seen. Many think Mayweather will simply outlast McGregor over 12 rounds to capture an easy decision. With his 49-0 record on the line and massive expectations riding on him, Mayweather has a lot more to lose than McGregor. But in typical Floyd “Money” Mayweather fashion, he's not particularly worried.

“He can come at me different ways, it’s not going to work,” Mayweather said after the July 13th press conference at Barclays Center. “When a guy is across from me, you know what he has to say to himself? ‘Damn, I’m fighting Floyd Mayweather.’ When the bell ring nobody knows that squared circle like me. I know angles. I know where to touch you at. I know what you do good. I know what you don’t like. And I don’t have to watch tapes. That’s something I’m blessed with.” 

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