Isaiah Thomas Trade; Gronk Going Hollywood?; Special Guest Kenyon Martin | Out of Bounds

On today’s show, special guest Kenyon Martin joins Gil and the #OutofBounds gang to talk the day’s biggest sports stories. The convo kicks off with the looming NBA trade deadline and how trades affect team chemistry. Next, the crew discusses the three-year extension Sixth Man of the Year candidate Lou Williams just signed with the Clippers. Did he sell himself short in seeking stability and security? With late breaking news that the Cavs are trading Isaiah Thomas, Channing Frye, and their protected first-round pick in 2018 to the Lakers for Larry Nance, Jr. and Jordan Clarkson, our “In Play” look at Cleveland’s big nationally-televised Sunday matchup in Boston — when the Celtics will retire Paul Pierce’s jersey — is extra spicy. Adam and Pierce break down the impact that the trade will have on both teams, as well as how it will affect the big game. Finally, following a report that Rob Gronkowski could retire from football to become a Hollywood action star, the team weighs in on how good he’d be, and also makes picks for athletes who would be great flexing muscles on the big screen.

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Post Malone Claims It’s a Struggle Being a White Rapper

It’s no secret Post Malone and hip-hop have a turbulent relationship. Malone clings to hip-hop as his main source of popularity and income, while turning his back on it in lyrics, interviews, and on Twitter. It's a paradoxical, but not historically uncommon, approach for Post as a white artist to pick and choose what he likes without caring where it came from. In an apologetic new given the opportunity to claim/denounce a genre that he’s appropriated without fully paying proper respect.

Writer Bijan Stephen breaks down Malone’s sound as a genre-bending melange of emo, rock, pop, hip-hop, and country, comparing him to the likes of Lil Peep and Lil Uzi Vert—other rappers bringing a darker, rockier sound to the rap game. “It should just be music, you know?” Post says as he throws back an unknown number of Bud Light during the interview. (Within hours of publication, the article had been edited to read “beers.”) “Because I’ve met so many people that’ll say, ‘I listen to everything except for this, or this,’ you know? And I think that’s stupid. If you like it, you should listen to it.”

While we can spend all day dissecting the exact influences on Post’s style, it’s misleading to say that he profits directly off of anything but presenting himself as a hip-hop artist. He tried to be in a heavy metal band, remember? Didn’t work out. “Rockstar” made it to No. 1 through the help of places like Spotify’s influential Rap Caviar playlist and 21 Savage’s established rap fan base. Stoney keeps distancing himself from that reality, even saying “If you’re looking for lyrics, if you’re looking to cry, if you’re looking to think about life, don’t listen to hip-hop,” in one interview.

It’s almost as if Post is running away from hip-hop, and it just won’t leave him alone! But that’s of course not the case. Post returns again and again, because hip-hop is the most popular genre in the country right now—and, as I mentioned, the metal band didn’t exactly top the charts.

“I definitely feel like there’s a struggle being a white rapper. But I don’t want to be a rapper. I just want to be a person that makes music,” he says to GQ. “I make music that I like and I think that kicks ass, that I think the people who fuck with me as a person and as an artist will like.”

The interviewer then proceeds to spoon-feed Post a few race-related questions to try and see if the rapper—I’m sorry, musician—addresses any of his previous problematic statements.

Do you see that it’s political to be a black rapper?

“Yeah, yeah!” he says. “I mean…shit.”

And you also recognize that there are separate struggles that go along with race, right?

“Yeah,” he says, “of course.”

The writer seems satisfied with these responses, but those half-assed answers don’t really reveal anything we didn’t already know. Post Malone wants all the access and success of being a rapper without accepting his privilege, and will use tactical non-answers to keep it. He also drinks a lot of Bud Light.

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Cavs Hot Mess; Racism in Sports? Tom Brady Only Star Left | Out of Bounds

Welcome back to Season 2 of #OutOfBounds! The team kicks it off on Martin Luther King Jr. Day by discussing which major U.S. sports league has come closest to realizing MLK’s dream. Adam is concerned about the Cavaliers’ recent performance and questions if they can win today against the Golden State Warriors, but Gilbert is confident LeBron’s got it in the bag. Saints rookie safety Marcus Williams embarrassingly missed a crucial tackle that led to the Vikings last-second playoff win. Does Minnesota, or any of the remaining teams with suspect QBs, have a chance of knocking Tom Brady and the Patriots off?

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The 10 Most Expensive Sneakers of 2017

If a sneaker doesn’t resell for a ton of money, was it ever released in the first place? With the secondary sneaker market being a billion dollar industry, it’s put more focus on what a shoe’s worth is after it releases than what it costs in stores. Good luck getting a pair at retail, bud. You’ll have to fork your dollars over on eBay or Flight Club. And that’s what you’ll need to do for the latest Air Jordan collaboration, Pharrell x Adidas sneaker, or shoe that drops only at an obscure pop-up shop half-way across the world. We’re not talking chump change either, people are shelling out major coin to cop some of these exclusive kicks. Here are some of the Most Expensive Sneakers of 2017.

To gather the info, we used StockX to find out the average resale values of all the sneakers.


  • Off-White x Air Jordan 1

    Resale value: $1,100

    The “best” sneaker of the year is also one of the most sought-after, which is the case for the Off-White x Air Jordan 1. The release for the shoe was so mad that Nike had to postpone it, with the SNKRS app shutting down due to the high demand. If you wanted this year’s top shoe, you needed to pay top dollar.


  • Air Jordan 1 Royal Satin

    Resale value: $1,590

    I’ve been very critical of Jordan’s deceptive release practices in 2017, but the Satin version of the Air Jordan 1 “Black/Royal” showed a dedication to storytelling. The shoes only dropped at Walters in Atlanta and Active Athlete in Houston, two mom and pop shops that carried the shoes when they first releases. That rarity and regional exclusiveness drove up the resale market for these satin joints. And, oh yeah, people love “Black/Royal” Air Jordan 1s.


  • A Cold Wall x Nike Air Force 1

    Resale value: $1,631

    Unless you have a pile of money or a plug in London, you probably didn’t get your hands on the A Cold Wall x Nike Air Force 1. Only released at a pop-up in in the Big Smoke, the sneakers were a throwback to classic Air Force 1 styling and were even given The Harlem Lace Job in the press photos. Talk about authenticity.


  • Just Don x Air Jordan II “Arctic Orange”

    Resale value: $1,646

    Just Don and Jordan Brand dropped the third installment of their Air Jordan II trilogy this year, this time releasing them in sizes for the whole family. The men’s pairs are going for bread, too. It all makes sense that the sneakers, being inspired by luxury handbags, actually go for the price of a luxury handbag.


  • Adidas Pharrell NMD Hu Race Trail “Cotton Candy”

    Resale value:  $1,751

    Pharrell had a really hot year with Adidas, and one of his Hu Race NMD Trail sneakers were only sold at BBC in New York City. Guess what? They resell for way more than the pairs that were sold everywhere. Surprised? Not in the least.


  • Air Jordan 1 “Spike Lee”

    Resale value: $2,397

    Besides Michael Jordan, Spike Lee is the face of the Air Jordan, coming in with the Air Jordan III to sell it as his Mars Blackmon character. In the film She’s Gotta Have It, Mars wore a pair of Black/Royal Air Jordan 1s while having sex, and now Spike has his own Air Jordan 1s. Done up in a similar colorway, the sneakers featured Mars’ face on the heel, were only sold in Brooklyn, and retailers for $300. Now they’re re-selling for over $2,000. Call that a cultural cash-et.


  • Adidas Futurecraft 4D

    Resale value: $2,892

    Adidas was supposed to release this sneaker to the public by the end of the year, but it hasn’t hit retail yet. But the brand did give away 300 pairs to friends and family… .and most of them ended up on eBay. They feature cutting-edge technology in the midsole, but they look badass, too, even if the majority of people who get them saw them as a way to cash in.


  • Adidas Pharrell NMD Hu Race Trail “N*E*R*D”

    Resale value: $5,185

    Pharrell and Adidas figured out the hype train this year, and it came to a culmination at ComplexCon with a special pair of Pharrell’s Hu Race NMD Trail that was made for the release of N*E*R*D’s new album. Kids literally fought over the shoes, which drove the resale price up even higher.


  • Chanel x Adidas Pharrell NMD Hu Race Trail

    Resale value: $11,135

    Pharrell got Adidas to collaborate with Chanel on his signature sneakers and released them at Colette for the retailer’s send off after 20 years of business. The demand was so great for them that they had to get a court bailiff to read off the auction winners. Coupled with the fact that there were only 500 pairs made, and that put this shoe as one the most in-demand releases in ages.


  • Air Jordan III “Grateful”

    Resale value: $13,250

    DJ Khaled is one of the most divisive people in the sneaker game. For some, he possesses the enthusiasm they’ve been looking for. For others, anything he touches instantly makes the product uncool. But Jordan Brand rewarded his faithfulness to the company this year with this own Air Jordan III. The shoes were given away to select folks who bought his new album, which means very few pairs are circulating. Sneakers are good investment, indeed.

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A Look at All the Dope Props From ‘Kingsman: The Golden Circle’

The second installment of the Kingsman series, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, debuted at the top of the North America box office earlier this year with a star-studded cast and a ton of action to keep viewers satisfied. 

We traveled to London to get an up-close look at the props that were used in the film, including rare kicks from adidasMr Porter, the actual rifle Channing Tatum used on set, and a mine-detecting baseball bat. Check out the full scoop in the video above.

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Odell Is Killing the Giants; Shump and Teyana the Best NBA Couple? | Out Of Bounds

On today’s episode of #OutOfBounds the crew kicks things off with Duke University’s win over Michigan State. Gilbert Arenas agrees that LeBron should be considered for a trade and draws the line at hollering at married women. Mia Khalifa admits Odell Beckham Jr. is the only reason she watches Giants games and believes talented athletes should have more power over the organizations they play for.  

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Mia Khalifa and Gilbert Arenas Decide If Iman Shumpert and Teyana Taylor Are NBA’s Best Couple on ‘Out of Bounds’

On today's episode of Out of Bounds, the crew kicks things off with Duke University's win over Michigan State. Gilbert Arenas agrees that LeBron James should be considered for a trade and draws the line at hollering at married women. Mia Khalifa admits Odell Beckham Jr. is the only reason she watches Giants games and believes talented athletes should have more power over the organizations they play for. They also debate if Iman Shumpert and Teyana Taylor are the NBA's best power couple.

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Draymond Green Talks About the Time Kobe Bryant Gave Him the Best Advice Ever

Since retiring from basketball in April 2016, Kobe Bryant has been really vocal about how he’s more than open to dishing out advice to the current crop of NBA players. All they need to do, Kobe has said, is give him a call, and he would be happy to help them out in whatever ways he can.

One player who has turned to Kobe early and often is Warriors star Draymond Green. Green and Kobe exchanged texts during the 2016 NBA Playoffs when the Warriors were facing a seemingly insurmountable 3-1 deficit during a series against the Thunder (Golden State would rebound to take that series by winning three straight games), and according to Green, there are other times Kobe has helped him out with his problems, too.

During a recent interview with GQ, Green talked about the time that Kobe gave him the best advice he’s ever received. Shortly after the 2016 NBA Playoffs ended with the Warriors blowing a 3-1 lead of their own to the Cavaliers, Green was feeling really down about his perception throughout the league. He had been accused of kicking a couple players during the Warriors’ playoff run, and he was quickly gaining a reputation for being a dirty player. So he turned to Kobe for guidance.

“I was going through all that shit with the media and with the kicks and I was fucked up,” Green said. “So I called Kobe, and said, 'This shit’s killing me, because these people are painting me to be something that I’m not, wondering, would I kick anybody on purpose? I wouldn’t kick anybody on purpose. It’s fucked up.'”

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Kobe understood Green completely and helped him cope with the situation by talking to him about how most people are okay with being mediocre. Those people, Kobe said, would never be able to understand Green and his drive for greatness. So Kobe told Green that “as long as you wait for them to understand you, you’re fucked.”

It was exactly what Green needed to hear. “It was the best shit I ever heard,” Green told GQ. “Because it gave me an understanding of why people don’t understand me. I’m so crazy competitive. I put my competitiveness up there with anyone. How could someone understand that? It’s a different level.”

Green drops all kinds of gems in his GQ interview. You can check out the entire thing here.

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New Age of SoundCloud Rappers: Squidnice

SoundCloud has acted as a platform to discover new and emerging artists who hustle and get their music out to a wide audience of loyalists who follow a musician's career from its inception. After Lil Uzi Vert used the platform as a launching point for worldwide success, Complex has identified the new crop of SoundCloud rappers who are using it to build their brand, distribute their tracks, and create an empire of their very own.

With his unique approach, Squidnice has quickly become a name to know from the New York rap scene. Here the Staten Island representative shares the story behind his name, what his tattoos symbolize, and also kicks a freestyle. Check out the full video up top.

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