Watch CyHi the Prynce Get Interviewed by Puppies

When CyHi the Prynce's No Dope on Sundays dropped earlier this month, you could hear an industry-wide sigh of relief. CyHi had escaped from label jail, and the results were nothing short of excellent. We've always known CyHi as one of GOOD Music's most reliable writers, but now he's branching off from Kanye and Pusha, proving his worth as a solo artist. 

We've come a long way from “Elephant in the Room.” No Dope on Sundays is a sharp, cutting observation of everything from building new social structures (“Nu Africa”) to time spent in Atlanta's trap houses (“Dat Side”), and CyHi is floating over consistently epic production from the likes of Lex Luger and Anthony Kilhoffer. Too often, these delayed projects disappoint due to the surrounding hype. CyHi bucked the trend and delivered. 

“I was just in a messy situation being from Atlanta,” CyHi recently told DJ Booth. “They want you to do trap music, and I’m someone who is going against that grain.” All seems forgiven on No Dope On Sundays. He's turning to friends old (Jagged Edge, Kanye West, Pusha T) and new (Travis Scott), and the fans are responding. So when CyHi showed up to be interviewed by puppies, it was more of a celebration than an interrogation. 

We had been lucky enough to hear the album way back in March 2017 (he performed “Nu Africa” on our roof), and even back then CyHi had the vision. “I reek confidence, I reek social issues,” he told Jinx. “I've experienced a whole other life that I can combine with my spirituality… if I see I need to speak on something, I do that.”

Watch CyHi's episode of Hounded above, and revisit the party that send him to jail below. 

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UK Rapper/Singer Dylan Cartlidge Delivers a Much-Needed Message With the “Love Spoons” Video

UK rapper, singer, and multi-instrumentalist Dylan Cartlidge was inspired by all the negative in the world, but instead of reacting with anger or disappointment, he responded with a message of hope. “Love Spoons” is an uplifting song with a sense of urgency, and it's exactly what we need right now. Watch the new Katia Ganfield-directed video above, and read a short interview with Dylan below.

“Love Spoons” has a really positive message. What inspired that, and why is it important for you to share right now?​

I believe so strongly in hope above adversity, and this song was written in part as a response to all these horrific attacks that were happening around the globe, one after another. It was awful. The Orlando attack in particular really struck me, as I couldn't believe those people had been targeted for the way in which they express their love. So I combined the feelings and thoughts from this period with my own feelings on individuality and hope above adversity. Regardless of age, gender, skin color, sexual orientation, or background, being you is a key to truly finding happiness. I think now more than ever there's somebody somewhere that could do with hearing that.

Musically, this isn't like a lot of the current styles making the rounds right now. What music influences you?

Kid Cudi is basically my idol, being a rapper by trade I grew up listening to a lot of rap, R&B, soul, and mainstream chart music mainly but lived in a household as a child with a trance DJ and '80s pop fanatic for a good while but typically, Lupe Fiasco, Stromae, Olu, Kanye West, Cage, Mac Miller, The Cool Kids. I then joined a band when I was 16, and for the first time had openly experienced music with live instruments, guitars and riffs, bands like The Black Keys, The White Stripes. I've never looked back since, totally blew my mind, my musical horizons had been broadened.

What can you tell us about the music video for “Love Spoons”? Where was it shot, who are the people featured in it? Any stories from the shoot that you remember?

The video was shot by a wonderfully talented lady named Katia Garfield who's done videos for the likes of Childhood, Demob Happy, and loads of others. It was all shot on her super cool VHS camera in the seaside town I live in named Redcar. I'd gotten many friends, family, and people I knew involved to try and showcase as many forms of love as I could find, in all different relationships and people. I even roped my girlfriend Holly into it!

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Everything We Know About Travis Scott’s ‘Astroworld’

It certainly doesn't feel like 15 months since Travis Scott dropped Birds in the Trap Sing McKnight. The album still sounds as fresh as it did on release day, and Scott has continued to push his music forward at a furious pace.

He's stayed in our playlists with new music—”Butterfly Effect” and “4 AM” alone would mark a successful year for most artists—and been touring relentlessly, often atop his giant birdBut the Houston rapper has also continued to make headlines for the music yet to come. There's a collab album with Quavo that was shipped off for mixing last week (if Quavo is to be believed), and then, there's Astroworld.

The album has become something of a folk tale for the Houston rapper's fans. It's a project closely tied to his city: the name is derived from a local amusement park that closed in 2005, and that closure still stings. “They tore down AstroWorld to build more apartment space,” Scott told GQ in May. “That’s what it’s going to sound like, like taking an amusement park away from kids. We want it back.”  

He's been talking about Astroworld since before BITTSM even dropped, describing one of the best albums of 2016 as a “stepping stone” to Astroworld. So needless to say, we need it. But all Scott gives us these days is one word: “soon.”

Watch the timeline above to hear everything we know about Astroworld​ so far, and check out our new music recommendations for Travis Scott fans below. 

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How A-Trak Went From Teenaged Battle Champ To Global Ambassador of DJ Culture | Blueprint

As a kid, A-Trak was a natural turntablist who became a five-time world champion by age 18. His love for DJing and knack for remixes put him in connection with Kanye West at a pivotal time in both their careers. He would go on to launch Fool’s Gold Records and enjoy tremendous success due to the global popularity of EDM, while continuing to reinvent himself.

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Watch These New Yorkers Turn Up to “Bodak Yellow” at the Subway Station

Lest you're somebody who doubts the ability for music to unite people (which is an archetype I'm not even sure exists, but let's pretend it does because otherwise the only intro I got is “Check this video out because you might enjoy it”), watch this clip from Twitter user @mattwhitlockPM showing a number of people having fun during an otherwise mundane/frustrating experience (dealing with the NYC subway).

The reason they're having fun is because someone, somewhere within range is blasting Cardi B's “Bodak Yellow,” and though they're not dancing in unison that's really just an unrealistic standard propagated by Hollywood anyway. See for yourself, above.

In addition to having a crew of Big Apple commuters turn up simply because her music is playing within earshot, which was just the most recent potentially viral moment to take place in the subway, Cardi B is also set to have her next single “Cardier Cardi,” released less than two weeks from now, reportedly on Dec. 15.

She's also got the “Motorsport” video coming out on Dec. 1 sometime soon:

Lots of different stuff going on.

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Post Malone Says There’s Not a Lot of ‘Real Sh*t’ in Hip-Hop These Days

Post Malone claims contemporary hip-hop is lacking “real shit.”

During a filmed interview with Poland’s Newonce, the “Rockstar” artist advised people to stay away from the genre if they’re looking for something deep and intellectually stimulating.

“If you're looking for lyrics, if you're looking to cry, if you're looking to think about life, don't listen to hip-hop,” Malone said at around the 7:20 mark. “There's great hip-hop songs where they talk about life and they really spit that real shit, but right now, there's not a lot of people talking about real shit.”

It’s a pretty bold and surprising statement from someone who has had a decent amount of success within hip-hop; however, Malone insists there is a time and place for the genre.  

“Whenever I'm trying to have a good time and stay in a positive mood, I listen to hip-hop,” he explained. “Because it's fun. I think hip-hop is important because it brings people together in a beautiful, happy way.”

You can watch Malone’s full interview below. He touches on a wide variety of subjects, including Kylie Jenner’s influence, working with Metro Boomin, his love for Elvis Presley, and Kanye West’s creative process.

On Monday, Malone announced his highly anticipated sophomore album, Beerbongs and Bentleys, would arrive next week. The rapper revealed the news during a podcast interview with H3.

“It's gonna be done. I'm gonna finish it this week,” he said when asked about the project’s status. “It'll be out December 1 at midnight.”

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Rick Ross Says Kanye Made Him Throw Out First “Devil in a New Dress” Verse

While out at ComplexCon, Rick Ross sat down with Complex News' Speedy Morman to talk about one of the most important verses in his catalog: his song-closing bars on Kanye West's “Devil in a New Dress.”

During the My Beautiful Dark Twisted panel, Rozay revealed he had to record another verse for the song. Here, he shared more about the experience.

“When I recorded that verse for the first time, he came in, heard it,” Ross recounted, “he told me he thought I could do better. And he walked out.” The MMG boss didn't let that moment deter him from delivering something special. “And then I wrote another one, and the second verse I wrote is the one you hear on the album.”

Check out the full interview above, where Ross also talks about standing up for Lil Wayne in the Birdman financial feud

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Kim Kardashian Accidentally Confirms Gender of Third Child With Kanye West on ‘Ellen’

Kim Kardashian revealed the gender of her third child with Kanye West on ‘Ellen.’

Cam’ron Calls Out Kanye for the Way He Handled Jay Z Feud

This time last week, all we knew was that Cam'ron was dropping his latest mixtape. After gracing ComplexCon over the weekend (with a gang of puppies), we didn't know WHAT to expect from Cam's new project, The Program, although he did drop some hints at the material he'd be releasing, posting on Instagram earlier this week that he was “on some bullshit on this joint,” then warning “If u emotional don't listen.” Who was thinking that this meant he had some lines ready for Kanye West?

On the mixtape's fourth track, “Coleslaw,” Cam starts things off speaking about the situation between Kanye West and Jay Z, which rose back into conversation via Hov's “Kill Jay Z” on 4:44. After saying “you don't like it when I'm nice. You only like it when I'm ignorant, so that's exactly what you get,” Cam went in.

Kanye got on stage, what he do? Play Jay-Z out
What he do next? Check into the crazy house?
Fuck that, you made a living talking greasy
Besides that, man, you Yeezy with the Yeezys
Be yourself, you ain't gotta go AWOL
And fuck that, 'Ye, I been that way since yay tall
If you regret it, then dead it, but if you said it, you said it

It's hard to tell what made Cam address the situation, aside from a longstanding (and still extant) antagonism towards Hov. No matter what, it's an interesting verse. On one hand, Cam appears to be throwing shots at Kanye, but on the other hand, Killa Cam is also encouraging 'Ye to stand behind his words.

Interesting times, either way. Check out The Program for more of Cam's fire.

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Meet Willo Perron, the Creative Genius Behind Jay-Z’s ‘4:44’ Album Art and Tour

Hunched over his laptop, Willo Perron is scrolling through a digital mock-up of an unreleased project for Jay-Z’s 4:44 album. Over several peach-colored pages, in simple black Larish Neue font, there are release dates for 4:44 in different countries, photos of the 4:44 ads plastered on billboards, buses, taxis, and subway stations that teased the rapper’s thirteenth studio album, and more. “It’s really a manual for the 4:44 brand,” he says, sitting in his West Hollywood studio on an October afternoon.

Perron, a multi-disciplinary designer and director, collaborated with Jay-Z to concept the packaging and creative direction for 4:44. He designed the album artwork and played a seminal role in the brilliant rollout that included the mysterious “4:44” ads and the black and white teaser starring Oscar winner Mahershala Ali, which premiered during the 2017 NBA Finals. “We went through a few other iterations of what the record was going to be called,” Perron says in his first extensive interview. “When we landed on 4:44, I was like, ‘It’s just this color and these digits.’ We wanted to do a really didactic campaign.”

While he won’t say much about it, he also designed the set and stage visuals for the official 4:44 Tour, which kicked off late last month. During the show, Jay-Z performed on an octagonal stage, placed in the middle of the stadium, with eight vertically-suspended screens hovering above him that showed various camera angles from the stage and footage of peers and family, some of which he erased himself from.

Perron first worked with Jay-Z on the rapper’s 2012 American Express UNSTAGED performance at South by Southwest. But he’s been behind the scenes of other memorable album covers, live shows, retail spaces, and videos for years. In 2008, he worked on Kanye West’s critically acclaimed Glow in The Dark Tour. Rihanna has enlisted him to creative direct many of her performances, including her Diamonds Tour, ANTI Tour, and her 2016 MTV Video Vanguard Award production. “I guess after years of successful Kanye and Rihanna stuff, you eventually get that call [from Jay-Z],” he says. He also designed the set and stage visuals for Drake’s 2013 Would You Like A Tour? and built several of Stüssy’s retail locations. Most recently, he was responsible for the blockbuster Nike x NBA global launch, where the league’s new jerseys were revealed behind three moving big screen monoliths.

The titles creative director and art director have become commonplace today. Nearly all of the top acts in music have at least one consigliere in their team. The Weeknd has La Mar Taylor. Mike Carson oversees Big Sean’s project. West, over the years, has built an entire team of collaborators under Donda, his well-regarded creative company. But when Perron first worked with West, the profession didn’t exist. He didn’t set out to become one either. “Back in the day, I think that was more management in the artists’ ears,” he says. “I don’t think anyone really cared about titles, but I was like, ‘If I’m going to do this everyday, with this guy, it can’t just be ‘Kanye’s entourage has a couple creative guys in there.’ It felt like a lack of respect for the craft. But it definitely wasn’t intentional.”

“Willo is the original,” adds Matt George, the man behind streetwear emporiums Nomad and Stüssy in Toronto and Vancouver. George has known Perron for almost 15 years and has worked with him on various projects, including Stüssy’s brick and mortar locations. “Willo’s one of the guys that made that term synonymous with these kids. You hear people all the time now say they’re creative directors, but he is the truest sense of that word.”

For the last two decades or so, Perron has masterminded some of the biggest projects, for some of the biggest artists and brands in the world. But after all the success, where does he want to go from here?

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