Joey Badass Jumps In King of NYC Talk, Jay & Bey Tour, Chance Album Expectations | Everyday Struggle

On today’s #EverydayStruggle, DJ Akademiks, Wayno, Star, and Nadeska jump back into the King of NYC talk, debating about whether or not Joey Badass or ASAP Rocky deserve a mention. Later, they speculate about the Jay Z and Beyonce rumored tour, Chance’s next album, and much more. 

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Who is ASAP Twelvyy?

Longevity is the enemy of the internet. We are living in a whirlwind, a news cycle constantly destroying itself in the search for new material. It's as true in music as it is anywhere else, and to stay relevant, you have to bring something new.

ASAP Mob understood this from the beginning. They first started making noise in New York in 2006, welcoming a steady stream of new members who brought their own sauce to the group. ASAP Twelvyy joined shortly thereafter, and by the time ASAP Rocky signed a multimillion dollar deal in 2011, the plan was in motion—year after year, the group has targeted and dominated a new corner of the music market. By 2017, Twelvyy had cemented himself as one of the Mob's most reliable members. But due to some scrapped plans and Yams' untimely death in 2015, he had yet to release a solo project. 

That all changed this past August with the arrival of 12. In 2014, ASAP Yams called it “the best NY rap album in years,” and he wasn't far off. It's a dense, fiery collection of songs that simultaneously embraces the past and future in true ASAP fashion, especially on the Phantogram-sampling “Diamonds” and the murky aggression of “A Glorious Death.” Features from Ferg, Rocky, Joey Badass, Flatbush Zombies, and the rest of the Mob ensure 12 as a decidedly East Coast family affair, but the production is often as modern and forward-thinking as anything else out. 

Through it all, Twelvyy plays the ringmaster—it would be easy to get lost in so many big names, but now Twevlyy is one of them. We caught up with the Harlem-born rapper to take it back to the start, and hear how he plans to give back to the neighborhood that raised him. “There were days I didn't have anything but music to listen to,” Twelvyy says. “Right now, I'm still trying to figure out what success is… I still have a long way to go. I wanna help. I wanna help for real, because a lot of people get, but they don't give… Or they give, but they give in the wrong way.”

Watch our Who Is? with Twelvyy above, and listen to 12 below. 

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Joey Badass Says Eclipse Made Him ‘Legally Blind to the Bullsh*t’

Joey Badass is having a lot of fun with these increasingly hilarious total solar eclipse rumors. 

As you may recall, Joey's announcement earlier this week that three appearances on Logic's Everybody's Tour had been canceled “due to unforeseen circumstances” was met with fans immediately pulling up a pair of tweets about his alleged eclipse viewing methods.

Thursday, Peter Rosenberg gave Joey a call on Ebro in the Morning to clarify the rumors. “I'm legally blind,” he joked at the start of the call, before later confirming that joke was indeed a joke. “I'm OK, guys.”

Still, Joey decided to keep trolling everyone with additional faux updates on his post-eclipse eyes via Instagram. “Doc said I gotta keep these on in the daytime now,” Joey said in one post, showing off a pair of glasses that at least one fan found enviable enough to publicly ponder staring at eclipses, just to have an excuse to wear them. “A lil annoying but they're pretty fire,” Joey added.

 

A post shared by joZif BADMON [💰💰] (@joeybadass) on Aug 25, 2017 at 10:36am PDT

In another post Friday, Joey clarified his previous joke to Rosenberg about being “legally blind” after the eclipse. “It's a lot of rumors and allegations going on about me, a lot of people are confused, a lot of people are worried and hitting my phone, so I just wanted to come on here and address the situation,” Joey said. “Yep, haha, jokes is on me. It is true. I can now see the future. In fact, I am now legally blind to the bullshit.”

For those wondering, staring at an eclipse isn't required to achieve a blindness to the bullshit.

According to Joey's website, his next scheduled performances are at the Meadows Music an Arts Festival in New York City Sept. 15 and the Spaceland Block Party in Los Angeles Sept. 17.

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Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks Break Down Logic vs. Joey Badass and ‘WTT 2’ Theories on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska discuss Rihanna being a savage, new Donald Glover music on the way, and the announcement of an upcoming G-Unit project. The crew also break down the Logic and Joey Badass freestyle session and share some thoughts on who might win in an actual battle between the two rappers. Later, Budden and Akademiks celebrate the recent anniversary of Jay Z and Kanye West's Watch the Throne album and debate whether or not they would like to hear a sequel. 

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Big Sean Previewed a New Travis Scott Collab and It Sounds Like a Banger

Lollapalooza 2017 wrapped up Sunday night in Chicago's Grant Park, capping off a four-day marathon of memorable performances. Ahead of Justice's closing set on the Bud Light stage Sunday night, Big Sean hit his Mike Carson-designed stage for an energetic cruise through his increasingly stacked catalog.

 

Set design on fleek, @mikecarson not just my brudda, he da best! #92 #Don

A post shared by BIGSEAN (@bigsean) on Aug 6, 2017 at 9:10pm PDT

At one point during his set, Sean gifted the Lolla crowd with a tease of a new collaboration with Travis Scott:

The track is rumored to feature production by Metro Boomin. Sean also referenced the track's possible title—”We Go Legend”—in an Instagram post on Monday:

 

We go Legend 🔥🔥🔥

A post shared by BIGSEAN (@bigsean) on Aug 7, 2017 at 8:50am PDT

Sean and Scott last appeared together on DJ Khaled's Grateful single “On Everything” alongside Rick Ross.

Sean released his biggest album yet, I Decided, back in February. The album has maintained some serious legs on the charts thanks to a marathon of singles and videos, including “Sacrifices” featuring Migos. The “Sacrifices” video was first released as a gift to fans who made a physical album purchase, with Sean informing them in May that they had been given access to an app that allowed them to get a look at the video before anyone else. Shortly after, the video was made available on YouTube.

This year's Lollapalooza lineup also featured Chance the Rapper, Run the Jewels, Lorde, Blink-182, Lil Yachty, 21 Savage, Majid Jordan, Arcade Fire, Charli XCX, Joey Badass, Rae Sremmurd, and so many more. Catch pro-shot footage of Majid Jordan performing “Her” and Wiz Khalifa running through “Young Wild and Free” below.

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Zaytoven, Gucci Mane, and the Collaboration That Never Happened

Zaytoven has been Gucci Mane's go-to producer for years—he produced Gucci's breakout single “Icy” in 2005, and the two have worked together ever since. It's not an exclusive arrangement—Zaytoven's work with Migos, Future, Chief Keef has made him a household name in the South, but when the topic of iconic rapper/producer duos comes up, Zaytoven's name will always appear beside Gucci Mane's. 

That's due in part to their extensive shared history. This week's episode of What Had Happened Was finds Zaytoven and Gucci Mane at the beginning of their careers, when their studio was still in Zaytoven's mom's basement. They had a special guest in the studio that day, but Gucci Mane was tired. And when Gucci's tired, he naps. So Gucci decided to take a nap, and that's when things started to fall apart. Watch Zaytoven tell us what happened next, and check out the previous weeks' episodes here.

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Mike Will Made-It, Rae Sremmurd, and the Making of Beyoncé’s “Formation”

Over the past few years, Mike Will has become one of music's most sought-after producers. His list of hits is endless, but there's one song that stands head and shoulders above all else: Beyoncé's “Formation.”

In our inaugural episode of What Had Happened Was, Mike Will sat down with us to share the story of how “Formation” came to be. “The process was like gumbo,” he said—a gumbo that started with voice notes and Rae Sremmurd, and ended up including LeBron James, Jay-Z, and the Super Bowl. Watch the first episode above, and look out for more stories from Ice Cube, Joey Badass, and more every Wednesday on P&P's YouTube.

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5 Things We Learned About Joey Badass on ‘Everyday Struggle’

Though a lot of the rap world has been happy to throw dirt on the New York hip-hop scene, Joey Badass continues to carve out his lane within the city's storied history. After coming up through the underground and breaking through with projects like 1999, Badass has since established himself as one of the foremost lyricists in the game on recent projects like All-Amerikkkan Badass.

The 22-year-old rapper walks a fine line between paying homage to the old guard of rap while still staying relevant and fresh in today's scene. Badass sat down with the Everyday Struggle crew on Monday, and talked about a bunch of topics, from the stagnation of New York radio, Amber Rose, and much more. Here's what we learned from the interview.

Joey feels New York radio was slow to recognize him.

The DJs in New York City have a lot of cultural gravitas, and though the streaming era has changed how we hear new music for the first time, Badass noted that he felt unsupported by local radio when he was on the come up.

“There are many ways I could have been more supported,” said Badass. “The world recognized me before my home did. They should have jumped right on it. I was young, I didn’t know how to establish relationships and keep them.”

He takes (some) responsibility for not nurturing relationships early.

Despite how he feels on the radio front, Badass admitted he's partially responsible for his own predicament. Still, he continued to emphasize that people outside his hometown were happy to show love early on compared to his hometown.

“I didn’t realize I was burning a bridge by not communicating,” he said. “I think radio should never be late on local artists. I’m from here, I’m one of the few touring globally. Just me and [ASAP] Rocky … L.A., they've always supported me. I'm getting more love from L.A. than my own town.”

Joey spent a lot of money making All-Amerikkkan Badass, but he doesn't regret it.

Fans like to focus on how much an album sold or how much profit is being made from a tour, but few people think about what it takes to put together an album. Badass highlighted the cost of putting together his latest project, but he told Everyday Struggle it's not a concern for him.

“This is probably the most expensive album,” he said. “I probably spent like, I want to say a quarter [million]. It was definitely worth it, every cent.”

Joey thinks most hip-hop beef is lame.

After Remy Ma put Nicki Minaj on the Summer Jam screen, the Everyday Struggle crew had to talk about their long, drawn-out beef. But the young rapper claims he doesn't really pay any mind to that sort of thing, because he has a preference for settling the score through competitive freestyle instead of trading songs back-and-forth.

“Don't care about that beef shit,” he said. “I prefer sparring. Hip-hop beef is not going back and forth with tracks.”

He thinks you should respect hip-hop's youth movement.

The Everyday Struggle crew has had dust ups with some of the younger rappers in the game—what up, Lil Yachty—but Badass thinks a whole lot of people are underselling just how big some of the kids on the rise are right now.

Playboi Carti has the whole youth in his hand,” he said. Badass went on to defend Yachty, and accused Budden of downplaying the movement behind him. “You just don't want him to be happy. He might not be a star in two years, [but] he's a mega star right now.”

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Joey Badass Talks Nicki Minaj/Remy Ma Beef and XXXTentacion Getting Knocked TF Out on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Joey Badass stops by the studio to tackle some topics with Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska. During the show, the gang debate the influence of NYC radio, Remy Ma putting Nicki Minaj on the Summer Jam screen, the rumored Jay Z album, and DJ Khaled's new album tracklist. They also talk about the video of XXXtentacion getting attacked on stage. To wrap the show, the crew discuss what really makes a star in rap today and if some artists are just born with it. 

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The Best Rap Verses of 2017 (So Far)

2016 was supposed to have been the crazy year for music; 2017 was supposed to be a break. But here we are, halfway through the year, and it feels like rap music is exploding. Many of the best MCs under 40—Kendrick, Future, and Drake—have released full-lengths, and no matter what you hear from the shrinking, fearful cohort decrying the rise of “mumble rap,” hip-hop is as filled with great rapping as it's ever been. This list is the peak of the year so far, the 10 verses that commanded attention, prompted multiple rewinds mid-bar, and had us quoting lines for months on ends (honorable mention to Giggs' verse on “KMT,” which fulfilled the last qualification, if nothing else). One caveat: The list couldn't be made up entirely of Kendrick verses. Here are the best verses of 2017, so far. 


  • Black Thought, “Who Want It”

    Verse: 1
    Best line: “Otis used to sing how we should try a little tenderness/But they ultra envious, crazy disingenuous like/Who need a enemy if that's what type of friend you is?”

    “I got the wordplay of Wallace, work ethic of Shakur, I was sent into the future with a message from the Moors.” Black Thought doesn’t ease into verses as much as kick in the door with them, going from zero to one hunnid instantly—then keeps the intensity all the way up, bar after bar, with internal rhymes and references flowing by so fast—”I got plans, I’m taking my revenge like Roxanne/My man swam here from Mississippi, goddamn”—you’re rewinding to the start of the first verse before the second even starts. David Banner brings it too—it is his song, after all—but you might never get that far. —Russ Bengtson


  • Joey Badass, “Amerrikkan Idol”

    Verse: 1
    Best Line: “So turn the kid raps loud, I'm about to spazz out/Watch out, another n**** runnin' in the White House”

    The first verse on “AmeriKKKan Idol,” the last track on Joey Badass’s All-Amerikkkan Badass lasts nearly two minutes on its own, building to a crescendo around the minute-and-a-half mark—”Got a message for the world and I won't back out/So turn the kid raps loud, I'm about to spazz out/Watch out, another n**** runnin' in the White House”—before trailing off in frustration before the chorus kicks in. When the title of your album is a nod to one of Ice Cube’s best, you’d better bring it. With this anti-white supremacy lyrical assault—”Media's got this whole thing tainted, that's all fact/Feedin' you lies like this whole thing wasn't built on our backs”—he does exactly that. —Russ Bengtson


  • Future, “Might As Well”

    Verse: 1
    Best Line:“You will never know what I was in”

    We all know that Future's life has had its valleys and peaks. But on “Might As Well” he spends less time romanticizing his rough time in the streets or providing flamboyant accounts of gluttony—instead he hopscotches over the Tarantino production, paralleling his tough past with his prosperous present.

    Due in equal parts to his clear delivery, illustrative lyrics, and self-awareness he manages to poetically portray a rags to riches story, devoid of fantasy or Mafioso cliché. In its place are bars that are honest and relatable. —Brandon 'Jinx' Jenkins


  • Rick Ross, “Idols Become Rivals”

    Verse: 3
    Best Line: “Last request, can all producers please get paid?”

    Man, Rozay sounds so disappointed in how Birdman handles business and his words hit even harder over a beat flip of Jay Z and Beanie’s deadbeat-dad ethering, “Where Have You Been.” Birdman has been, for the most part, quiet since this track dropped. We hope he can find it in his heart to make amends with the people he hurt over the years. Still can’t get over how the Boss felt when he found out the watches were fake and the cars were rented, smfh. —Angel Diaz


  • Offset, “Met Gala”

    Verse: 1
    Best Line: “Get to the top and we blew the ladder up”

    It's always exciting when a recent real-life flex is flipped into a song. Offset and his Migos family storming the Met Gala just a few weeks ago was a major moment on the timeline, a nice example in a half-year full of them of just how far the Migos have come and how glorious it is to watch them shine. To hear Offset, on a track with Gucci Mane, wax poetic about it so soon after feels like breaking the fourth wall, like he read our tweets about posing with Celine Dion and said, “Yeah, I can't believe it either.” Except, with Offset, it just becomes a brilliant new shortcut for flexing. How good is life? It's Met-Gala-invitation good. —Frazier Tharpe


  • Remy Ma, “Shether”

    Verse: 1
    Best Line: “And to be the Queen of Rap, you gotta actually rap”

    Nicki Minaj hasn’t been able to get anything to stick since Remy Ma released “Shether.” It's not the greatest song but as a verse—well, it didn’t shake up the game for an entire weekend for nothing (and 48 hours on Twitter is the equivalent of like nine human years). —Angel Diaz


  • Kendrick Lamar, “DNA”

    Verse: 2
    Best Line: “You mothafuckas can't tell me nothin/I'd rather die than to listen to you/My DNA not for imitation/Your DNA an abomination”

    The second verse of “DNA” feels like a cathartic explosion of that side of Kendrick that we all want to see. The side that took the wheel on Big Sean's “Control,” who snapped during his BET Cypher Freestyle in 2013, and resurfaced most recently on the “The Heart Part IV.”

    On “DNA” he's boisterous and superhuman, successfully distancing himself from further from his would-be peers. You can’t be him. He’s the Neo in hip-hop’s matrix. He’s dodging bullets and pulling triggers at the same damn time.

    It's such an insane display, Mike Will had to build the beat around Kendrick's words—nothing else in his library could accommodate the barrage (and Mike is known for his massive library). This is rap as Olympic sport, but it doesn't sacrifice content for the sake of remarkable form. The verse is full of striking images (“Beach inside the window, peekin' out the window/Baby in the pool, godfather goals” and quotables (“You ain't sick enough to pull it on yourself”).

    All while Rick James cries out for marijuana. —Brandon Jenkins and Ross Scarano


  • Drake, “Do Not Disturb”

    Verse: 1
    Best Line: They don't know they got to be faster than me to get to me/No one's done it successfully

    “Stylin though.” A simple and catchy opening, the sort of line Drake excels at. The casual confidence in those two words is appealing; if you saw it on the rack you’d want to try it on—it’s plain, but you think you’d look great in it. Then back home, you find it doesn’t work as well as you wanted.

    Relatability is overrated beyonds its ability to lure the listener in. It doesn’t keep butts in seats. At this point, is anyone still listening to Drake because they think their life is like his, that their struggles are similar? It’s the ghost of a feeling you occasionally glimpse but at this point we’re here for the Drake show, for his logo splashed on the sound a la mode and the rare peek behind the curtain at what his true life. That’s what “Do Not Disturb” gives you. “Stylin though/Dissin but got pictures with me smilin though.” The line is a revolving door—you think you’re in only to be spun back out to the sidewalk to spectate. He’s very good at what he does, you should pay attention. Wait for the summary. —Ross Scarano


  • Young Thug, “Sacrifices”

    Verse: 3
    Best Line: “Growing up, I was a running back/You never made me ran once (goddamn)/I got shot, sweat started running/That shit was red like Hunt (ketchup)” 

    The Young Thug that emerges about halfway into “Sacrifices,” the demure posse cut on Drake’s More Life, is one we haven’t seen before. Thug’s rapping is typically elemental, it defies categorization; explaining what Thug rapping sounds like describing the weather. On “Sacrifices,” though, Thug sounds different. Sober, surgically precise storytelling. It’s such a different flow than what fans are used to hearing that it’s tough to capture how strikingly weird the language is before Thug explodes into a Technicolor croon—the Thug we’re used to, and still thrilled by. He reins it in, later, capitalizing this new, darting rapping with his inextricably melody-laced, throaty delivery. The end result is formless impressionism, a completely new delivery from a new breed of rapper that works about as well as it sounds. It’s a triumph but, because it’s Thug, it’s impossible to say if we’ll ever hear a verse quite like it ever again. —Brendan Klinkenberg


  • Kendrick Lamar, “Duckworth”

    Verse: 1
    Best Line: “Because if Anthony killed Ducky, Top Dawg could be servin' life/While I grew up without a father and die in a gunfight”

    Just when you think you've seen all of K-Dot's tricks, know all of the major tentpoles of his story, this motherfucker goes and ends an already impressive album by putting his entire life into a Sliding Doors, cosmic context via the intertwined biographies of the two most important men in his life. A grand destiny fulfilled that could've easily been another banal and wasted life tossed about by the caprices of cause and effect. A tale this cinematic and unbelievably true needs John Williams on the score—9th Wonder provided the web and Kenny spun it like he was Homer delivering a myth from the heavens. Best verse on the best album of the year. —Frazier Tharpe

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