A Recap of New York Fashion Week Spring 2018

After a week of some of the biggest brands, designers, and celebrities all showing out for New York Fashion Week Spring 2018, it's now time to take a look back at some highlights. During a time when many people are questioning the importance of New York Fashion Week in comparison to its European counterparts, designers delivered some signature moments to lighten the discrediting of the festivities, even if only briefly. Brands like Helmut Lang, Opening Ceremony, Kith, Fenty Puma by Rihanna, and Alexander Wang all brought their own signature aesthetic to their respective shows. Here is a recap of some of the most entertaining shows from New York Fashion Week.

Some of the biggest celebrity cameos of the week came at Ronnie Fieg's Kith Sport show. The designer's second fashion show took place on Thursday night at the Classic Car Club Manhattan, where he showed off upcoming collections with brands like Moncler, Adidas Soccer, Champion, Iceberg, and Nike. Virgil Abloh, Scott Disick, and Carmelo Anthony were among the crowd, but two of the most memorable guests appeared on the runway. First, NBA Hall of Famer Scottie Pippen walked down the catwalk sporting pieces from Fieg's upcoming Nike collaboration. If that wasn't enough, Fieg decided to close out the show by putting a spotlight (literally) onto arguably the best basketball player in the world, LeBron James, who lip-synched the lyrics to Kanye West and Jay Z's “H.A.M.” 

Kith Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Kith's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Randy Brooke/WireImage)

This past Saturday night, Alexander Wang took to Brooklyn to celebrate #WangFest. The mobile show included the likes of Bella Hadid and Kendall Jenner stepping out of an Alexander Wang tour bus before strutting down the Brooklyn streets. Their looks, complete with party style hats that read “WangFest,” further alluded to the show's party atmosphere. Notable attendants included Kim Kardashian West and Kris Jenner, amongst others. Of course, the after party that Wang has become known for did not disappoint either. Cardi B and Ja Rule hit the stage to perform, and Dunkin Donuts, Dominos, and Budweiser took care of the food and drinks for the affair. 

Alexander Wang Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Alexander Wang's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Gotham/GC Images)

Sunday night brought about even more festivities with Rihanna showing off her motocross and surf-inspired Spring 2018 Fenty line at the Park Avenue Armory. This was Rihanna's return to New York after her last two collections were debuted in Paris. Staying true to the theme, dirt bike riders tricked off of ramps over pink sand mountains to start the show. RiRi also took her bow on the back of a motorbike. The show boasted a star-studded front row that included Cardi B, Offset, Big Sean, and Jhené Aiko, to name a few.

Fenty Puma by Rihanna's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show
Fenty Puma by Rihanna's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Randy Brooke/WireImage)

Opening Ceremony decided to show off its Spring 2018 collection a little differently as well. Humberto Leon and Carol Lim debuted their collection using a dance performance titled “Changers,” which was written and directed by Spike Jonze. The collection itself featured plays on the collegiate wardrobe like varsity jackets, club T-shirts, sweatpants, and flannel shirts.

On Monday, Shane Oliver debuted his first collection for Helmut Lang at Pearl River Mart. The collection heavily referenced Lang's archive with a lot of pieces featuring fetish design, and leather accents as an added twist from Oliver. The former Hood By Air designer also included memorable head-turners—like an oversized bra that converts into a bag—in his collection. The ready-to-wear featured a line of Helmut Lang tour merch that featured red and white “HELMUT” branding throughout. ASAP Ferg, Ian Connor, Lil Yachty, Jerry Lorenzo, and more were among those who sat front row. 

Helmut Lang Spring/Summer 2018 Fashion Show
Helmut Lang's Spring/Summer 2018 fashion show. (Image via Getty/Catwalking)

 

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Fyre Festival Founder Billy McFarland Released on $300,000 Bail (UPDATE)

UPDATED 7/2/17 3:15 p.m. ET: Fyre Festival organizer William “Billy” McFarland has been released on $300,000 bail after spending at least one night in a New York detention center following his arrest on wire fraud charges.

“The judge, Kevin N. Fox of United States District Court in Manhattan, set Mr. McFarland’s bail at $300,000, to be secured by $50,000 in cash or property,” reported Ben Sisario of the New York Times. “Mr. McFarland’s lawyer, Sabrina P. Shroff, said that he had been released after the hearing on Saturday, and that he had one week to satisfy the bail conditions.”

The Times also reports Shroff is a public defender, and Shroff told reporters McFarland was unable to pay his previous lawyers enough to continue representing him.

McFarland’s assets, or lack thereof, will likely be a point of contention during the trial. An unsealed, Department of Justice criminal complaint against McFarland released Friday, accused McFarland of misrepresenting his assets and his company's worth to convince investors to financially back the Fyre Festival.

See original story below.

The disastrous Fyre Festival from this spring that resulted in hilarious memes and a very public dragging of Ja Rule, will potentially have more serious results for its founder, Billy McFarland. Friday, the Department of Justice announced the unsealing of a criminal complaint charging McFarland with wire fraud.

“As alleged, William McFarland promised a ‘life changing’ music festival but in actuality delivered a disaster,” acting Manhattan U.S. Attorney Joon Kim said. “McFarland allegedly presented fake documents to induce investors to put over a million dollars into his company and the fiasco called the Fyre Festival. Thanks to the investigative efforts of the FBI, McFarland will now have to answer for his crimes.”

In April, the inaugural Fyre Festival was canceled at the last minute, leaving some attendees stranded in the Bahamas, as paid celebrity promoters and previously booked music acts distanced themselves from the event. 

The charge of wire fraud carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, though the DOJ noted the potential sentencing was only disclosed for illustrative purposes. 

According to the unsealed complaint, Fyre Media earned less than $60,000 in revenue from approximately 60 artist bookings between 2016 and 2017. However, the DOJ accuses McFarland of telling investors that Fyre Media earned millions of dollars in revenue from thousands of artist bookings from at least July 2016 until April 2017. The report went on to blast McFarland for providing “materially false” information to investors and putting on a festival that was “widely deemed to have been a failure.”

You can read the entire criminal complaint against McFarland and Fyre Media LLC at the Department of Justice website.

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Must-Read Script Imagines Fyre Festival Chaos as Comedy Starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Ja Rule

Leo, Ja Rule, that guy who used to host ‘Apprentice,’ and a delicious soda all pop up in Jordan VanDina’s Oscar bait ‘Lord of the Fyre.’

Leaked Fyre Festival Pitch Deck Is Proof It was Doomed to Fail

For Fyre Festival story no. 439, we are treated to the leaked pitch deck potential investors were given ahead of the doomed event's disastrous kickoff and subsequent postponement. Monday night, Vanity Fair's Nick Bilton shared the Fyre Festival pitch presentation in full, calling it one of the “most preposterous” outside capital invitations he's ever seen.

There's a lot to unpack here, arguably too much to unpack, but here are a few selected bits of preposterousness from the Bilton-obtained Fyre Festival pitch deck:

  • There's a Rumi quote slapped atop a photo collage of what the organizers hoped Fyre Fest would be: “Come, seek, for searching is the foundation of fortune.”
  • In another slide, the Fyre team vows that the “actual experience” of the festival “exceeds all expectations and is something that's hard to put to words.” Additionally, this slide promises, Fyre will “IGNITE that type of ENERGY, that type of POWER in our guests.”
  • Explaining the Fyre vision, the pitch deck summarizes the Fyre goals while referencing the “five elements of the earth.” According to this particular slide, Fyre has a five-year plan aimed at traveling the globe to discover “untouched lands” and flip them into “unparalleled experiences.”
  • Fyre Festival is touted as “the cultural experience of the decade.” Can't argue with that.

The most notable part, however, is the designation of so-called “Fyre Starters.” Fyre Starters are described as “ambassadors” who are part of the “Fyre Tribe.” Starters of Fyre listed in the leaked deck include Kendall Jenner, Bella Hadid, Hailey Baldwin, Ashanti, and more.

On Monday, TMZ claimed that claimed that Fyre founders Ja Rule and Billy McFarland had been “barred” from attempting another festival in the Bahamas. Another festival, however, is apparently in the works for an alternate location and inaugural attendees have been offered the option of eschewing refunds in favor of VIP passes to the next one.

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Fyre Fest’s Legal Troubles Are Likely to Get Much Worse

When attendees were flown to the Bahamas for Fyre Festival, they expected an exclusive luxury experience on a secluded island; in reality, they were given FEMA tents and dry American-cheese sandwiches.

According to insiders close to the organizers orchestrating the event, inadequate preparation had decided the fate of the festival long before last weekend. No artists had shown up, probably due to the fact that none of them had been paid. When attendees—who forked over thousands of dollars at various celebrities’ behest—arrived, they found “luxury villas” replaced by disaster relief tents and necessities in dangerously short supply. The scene resembled a high school track meet more than a high end resort. Many attendees found themselves hamstrung by sparse transportation largely under the control of the festival organizers and unable to leave the island. The situation quickly plummeted into what was described as some iteration of The Hunger Games.

On Sunday, it was reported that several festival goers had filed a class-action lawsuit against both Fyre Media—the company behind the botched festival—as well as Ja Rule and his partner Billy McFarland as individuals and also a number of employees, agents, or co-venturers of McFarland and Ja Rule that have yet to be named. The lawsuit claims that these employees may be considered a part of the conspiracy just by virtue of being involved in the planning of the ill-fated festival. The lawsuit alleges, in relevant part, that the defendants committed fraud and breach of the sales contract made via each ticket sale. These claims are probably not difficult to prove given the circumstances, but the complaint is littered with tweets and viral images, perhaps meant to go viral itself and elevate the profile of the plaintiffs’ case in hopes of netting a lush settlement. Their chances of obtaining over $100 million in damages are likely low, but one thing is certainly clear—the festival’s peace offering of a paltry refund and a promise for a better experience next year is not going to solve the humiliation and anger of the festival’s affluent clientele.

fyre
Image via Instagram

Events of this proportion usually maintain seriously high insurance policies, but it is unclear whether Fyre had one in this case. If not, the lawsuit is certainly likely to wipe out whatever is left in the Fyre Media Inc. bank account, but the same is not clear cut for Ja Rule and McFarland, as well as other employees of the company, who are named in their personal capacity. Generally speaking, a court will consider many factors to determine if the individuals can be liable, for example, whether the corporation has adequate insurance or funds to pay out the lawsuit, what the misconduct is, and whether other business formalities were adopted. However, this same analysis is not necessarily at play in case of any settlement, where Ja Rule and McFarland could decide to personally fork over some funds, particularly if they have any intention of keeping Fyre Media alive.

Just after the lawsuit was filed, the Fashion Law reported an exclusive statement from the plaintiff's’ counsel indicating that “all those who recklessly and blindly promoted the festival” will be head accountable. Given the vital role that social media influencers and models played in the promotion of the event, it seems almost unfathomable that they wouldn’t see some legal backlash. Kendall Jenner, Bella Hadid, Emily Ratajkowski, Chanel Iman, and Hailey Baldwin all participated in the campaign, some of them even posting native advertising on their own social media channels, encouraging fans to buy tickets to the world-class festival. Depending on claims that they made about the festival, and of course whether or not they disclosed that their posts were in fact advertisements—as is required by law—the Federal Trade Commission could get involved by prosecuting breach of Truth in Advertising laws.

Given the vital role that social media influencers and models played in the promotion of the event, it seems almost unfathomable that they wouldn’t see some legal backlash.

Ultimately, any personal liability that these celebrities take on will boil down to what their agreements were with the festival; a well-negotiated contract would usually force the festival to cover the cost of any lawsuit against a celebrity if the claim related to the festival itself. The same carefully negotiated agreement usually includes a carve out for the celebrity to abide by all applicable laws. Most of those posts are now deleted, but consider that some of the influencers may not have abided by mandatory FTC disclosure laws in their posts, and there’s a potential route for their liability. It’s hard to imagine that someone with a profile like Kendall Jenner would subject themselves to this kind of legal vulnerability, but there is no doubt that even if they are not themselves liable for the damage done, their reputations are taking a huge hit—effectively damaging their ability to command a high price to hawk the next product.

Finally, it is also possible that the Bahamian Ministry of Tourism could consider their own legal action, as estimations of income lost from the debacle are in the millions. For now though, the Ministry is distancing itself and promising to implement tougher vetting procedures for new festival planners. The Bahamas also issued a statement maintaining that it was not involved in the planning nor was it a sponsor of the festival, and asking guests and others who may have heard of the debacle not to let it tarnish their image of the country.

One thing remains at the core of many of these issues: leveraging your name for a product or event has high stakes, and while the festival organizers seem hopeful, a $100 million lawsuit and a reputation of incompetence is likely to keep them from proceeding next year.

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Ja Rule and Billy McFarland Reportedly Barred From Attempting Another Fest in Bahamas

Ja Rule and Billy McFarland, founders of the failed Fyre Festival, have reportedly been “barred” from trying again in the Bahamas. Bahamas Ministry of Tourism sources told TMZ they were planning to start enforcing a “stricter vetting system” for music festivals in the future, an overhaul that will include checking in with organizers repeatedly throughout any event's development process.

The reason the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism didn't intervene during the Fyre Festival's planning process, according to TMZ, is that they didn't have the authority due to its status as a private event. On Sunday, famous lawyer Mark Geragos filed a $100 million lawsuit against Ja Rule, Billy McFarland, and the Fyre Media brand alleging breach of contract, fraud, breach of covenant of good faith, and negligent misrepresentation.

The suit, TMZ reported Tuesday, also alleges that Fyre attendees were locked inside the airport terminal “for hours” as security officials put up a fence around the building to make sure no one left the premises. Additionally, some attendees reportedly passed out due to lack of water while waiting for a departing flight. There was also, according to a photo, some sort of tiny fire fyre going on?

Burned Fyre attendees have two options, according to the New York Times' Joe Coscarelli. they can take their refund and get on with their lives, or they can pay it forward by receiving VIP passes for whatever the Fyre team is planning for 2018:

All bummers aside, at least we got some decent Twitter jokes and the Matt Skiba-provided nickname Lord of the Entitled Flies out of this.

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Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks Debate Whether Ja Rule Is a Scammer and If Kendrick Is a Biter

On today's episode of Everyday Struggle, Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks share some Fyre Festival hot takes and decide whether Ja Rule is to blame. Later, they break down Travis Scott's concerts and determine if DJ Khaled's new single is actually the one. Next, the guys battle over Drake and Kendrick Lamar's standing in the rap game and whether they should be friendly. To wrap, Budden and Akademiks look at the claims that Kendrick bit a SoundCloud rapper and whether there's anything credible about it.

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What You Need to Know About the 25-Year-Old Douche Bro Behind Fyre Festival

For the last four or five days, your Twitter timeline has no doubt been inundated with the nightmare situation known as Fyre Festival, which went from being a $12,000-a-pop music festival for the rich, white elite to what looked like a disaster recovery situation (with actual disaster relief tents). In the fallout, it's been announced that Ja Rule and the squad behind the Fyre Festival is being hit with a $100 million class action lawsuit for their gross fuck up.

While it's been easy to chuck “Ja Rule The Scammer” tweets out there, it might be time to look at one of the other “names” on the Fyre Festival lawsuit; Billy McFarland. At 25, dude's already had his name affixed to a number of companies, primarily with an emphasis on millennials who want the finer things in life. He's one of those entrepreneurial guys who always seems to have a plan, and can apparently talk his way into a pile of money without truly delivering on his promises. A.k.a. the American way. Here's a look at Billy McFarland's pre-Fyre highlights.

McFarland's always been a businessman

When you were 13, you probably were trying to bag shorty in your math class; yung McFarland was already building his first startup, which apparently outsourced design work. A few years later, he was already dropping out of Bucknell University to found Spling, which at the time was another addition to the social networking space that secured $400,000 in funding back in 2011.

Neither of these startups caused as much havoc as his 2014 startup Magnises, which found McFarland creating his own black card (which after turned into an app, Magnises NOW) for millennials who were trying to get their IRL social status game up. It sounds dope, but apparently, you had to promise to spend $250,000 a year through the card (with a $250 annual fee) to get the Magnises perks like 24/7 concierge service, special treatment and discounts from elite brands and restaurants, and invites to exclusive events.

At the time, McFarland told Bloomberg that Magnises “enhances and really improves your everyday life in the city,” but in January of 2017, Business Insider reported that cardholders felt scammed, saying that the perks that Magnises promised (which included everything from Hamilton tickets to SR-22 plane rides to the Hamptons) were not being met. At the time, McFarland said Magnises “hit some roadblocks along the way, and that's what happens when you grow really quickly, and that's on me.” But McFarland's troubles weren't focused solely on Magnises' troubles.

McFarland trashed his $13,000-a-month West Village home

It's a given that when most young guys secure a bag, they might go ham with their earnings. According to the New York Post, in 2013 McFarland had a 500-person birthday party for photographer/socialite Patrick McMullan at his $13,750-a-month duplex on Greenwich Ave. This was one of many “blowout parties” that the landlord said caused roughly $62,000 worth of damage to the spot. At the time, the owner was looking for McFarland to pony up $100,000 in damages, but McFarland said the charges were “not valid.”

WTF is Fyre Media?

That's hard to say; according to LinkedIn, Fyre Media, Inc. was founded in 2015 is “an on demand service that makes booking the most influential celebrities, artists, athletes, models, and entertainers seamless and transparent.” They have an app, and it looks like some of their “exclusive” artists feature Fat Joe, Waka Flocka, Soulja Boy, Jim Jones, and Ja Rule. Rule, who has been listed as a co-founder of Fyre, is reportedly the “mastermind” behind the Fyre Festival, which McFarland was touting as a “luxury music festival” that was due to span two weekends (April 28-30, 2017 and May 5-7, 2017) in the Bahamas.

Aside from the musical acts, which were to include everyone from G.O.O.D. Music and Blink-182 to Disclosure and Lil Yachty, Fyre Festival was reportedly set to have $1 million worth of “hidden treasures” that would be found all over the island. It was also set to feature all kinds of rich, elite millennials attending, paying upwards of $12,000-a-pop to experience the music, art installations, talks, amazing food, and much more while chilling on the sands of Fyre Cay in the Bahamas.

As we now know, what the people got when they hit the island was the exact opposite of a “luxury music festival” experience, a day which McFarland told Rolling Stone was “definitely the toughest day” of his short, intriguing, possibly scam-filled life. It doesn't help that the festival appeared to be doomed from the start, with everything from “a rampant shark problem” and sandflies to the fucking FEMA tents and not having a stage(?!) setup revealed that Fyre was the dumpster fire it turned out to be from the rip.

McFarland also told Rolling Stone that “there will be make-up dates, May 2018 in the U.S., free for everybody who signed up for this festival,” although at this point, with his cache (and the social media shitstorm that followed the Fyre Festival) and that $100 million lawsuit looming over his head, what masochist would want to subject themselves to Fyre Festival, The Sequel?

Maybe McFarland needs to do what he does best: find new ways to rope money-hungry millennials into giving him more of their cheddar.

 

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Fyre Festival Head Admits They Were ‘A Little Naive’ In Statement

The Fyre Festival, a “luxury” music festival in the Bahamas, captured social media today after it was postponed. The reasons this festival fell apart were many: lack of organization, no security on the ground, canceled flights, mishandled luggage, “cabanas” that were actually disaster relief tents, terrible food, lockers without locks, and more. If it sounds like a lot, that’s because it was.

Amid the festival falling apart, the atmosphere was described as “total chaos” and “pandemonium.” For a full rundown of the festival’s demise, read this

Fyre Festival was scheduled to feature performances from some big-time artists: Desiigner, Blink-182, Lil Yachty, Pusha T, Rae Sremmurd, Tyga, and more. Ja Rule co-organized the festival, and Bella Hadid and Kendall Jenner are among the celebrities who promoted it.

Ja Rule said it’s not his fault, but he’s taking responsibility, which I’m pretty sure is literally the opposite of taking responsibility.

The festival’s head, 25-year-old Billy McFarland, has released a lengthy statement—via Rolling Stone—detailing how the festival fell apart and admitting that he and his team were “a little naive.” You can read the full statement below.

“Today is definitely the toughest day of my life. I'd love the opportunity to go through and tell my story of how we got here and how I see it now and where it's going.

I was a computer programmer, and after computers, the two things I love most are the ocean and, for some reason, rap music. So these three hobbies of mine somehow led me to meeting my partner, Ja Rule. Together, we became friends and business partners. For us, it was always a battle of pushing the limits. Once we got flying lessons together, we got on these really bad 40-year-old planes and flew from New York to the Bahamas—not really knowing the Bahamas very well—ran out of gas and landed in the Exumas and both of us immediately fell in love.

We started this website and launched this festival marketing campaign. Our festival became a real thing and took [on] a life of its own. Our next step was to book the talent and actually make the music festival. We went out excited, and that's when a lot of reality and roadblocks hit.

The Exumas didn't have a really great infrastructure—there wasn't a great way to get guests in here—we were a little bit ambitious. There wasn't water or sewage. It was almost like we tried building a city out of nothing and it took almost all of our personal resources to make this happen, and everything we had, to make this festival go on. We thought we were ready and built two different festival sites.

The morning of the festival, a bad storm came in and took down half of our tents and busted water pipes. Guests started to arrive and the most basic function we take for granted in the U.S., we realized, “Wow, we can't do this.” We were on a rush job to fix everything and guests were arriving and that caused check-in to be delayed. We were overwhelmed and just didn't have the foresight to solve all these problems.

We made sure all guests got a place to stay and had a really long conversation overnight last night after everyone was housed about what to do next and realized we couldn't risk the safety challenges. So that was the decision that we made—the first thing for us was making sure all these guests get refunded [and] all the vendors get taken care of. All the guests are going home, the refunds are being processed.

The weather unfortunately delayed flights and made them run into each other in terms of being close to when a lot of people were arriving. That was unfortunately something we had no control of, but it made things unacceptable for guests and we feel bad for it.

We thought we were making timeframes that were correct. We were a little naïve in thinking for the first time we could do this ourselves. Next year, we will definitely start earlier. The reality is, we weren't experienced enough to keep up.

Everybody who wants to go home is being sent home tonight. Some of the guests who are staying in private homes, we're asking them to stay longer, if they can. We're going to take every measure to make this right for everybody now, and make this right for everybody next year, on a large scale.

There will be make-up dates, May 2018 in the U.S., free for everybody who signed up for this festival. We will donate $1.50 [per ticket] to the Bahamian Red Cross. It'll keep the theme of being on water and beach. It'll be not just music, but all forms of entertainment. The one change we will make is we will not try to do it ourselves. We will make sure there is infrastructure in place to support us.”

Reading that, you have to feel at least a little bad for the guy. It’s clear he and his team got caught up in the excitement of their idea—which sounds good in theory, until you realize the Exumas were not set up at all for a festival—and got ahead of themselves.

Granted, a lot of people got screwed over by the Fyre Festival—that's nothing to overlook—but it sounds like the festival’s team is doing what they can to make it right.

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Luxury Fyre Festival in the Bahamas ‘Fully Postponed’ Amid Reports of Total Chaos

A so-called “luxury” music festival in the Bahamas originally scheduled to feature performances from Pusha T, Desiigner, Lil Yachty, Blink-182, and more has descended into complete pandemonium. The festival was co-organized by Ja Rule and promoted by Bella Hadid and other celebrities, but BBC News reported Friday that the event had been plagued with reports of “no security” and canceled flights.

Reports on social media, including a play-by-play rundown from writer William N. Finley IV that was still in progress at the time of this writing, paint a pretty grim picture of the Exuma proceedings:

On Thursday, Blink-182 issued a statement announcing their decision to pull out of their previously scheduled Fyre Fest performances this weekend and next weekend. “We're not confident that we would have what we need to give you the quality of performances we always give our fans,” the band said. Other artists listed on the festival's schedule included Skepta, Tyga, Kaytranada, Major Lazer, and Rae Sremmurd.

Fyre Festival, according to Vanity Fair, is a product of Fyre Media, the startup Ja Rule launched with tech partner Billy McFarland in 2015. “We didn't just want to be a tech company that was a pure enterprise with no consumer awareness,” McFarland said in an interview conducted prior to the chaos. “So a festival was a great way to go and do that and beyond people who are attending.” The festival aimed for luxury, with a spokesperson telling Vanity Fair it was possible “to spend in excess of $104,995” for the “Fyre experience.”

Early Friday morning, a Twitter account associated with the Fyre Festival announced that the event had been “fully postponed.” In a previous statement on Instagram, Fyre reps conceded that “things got off to an unexpected start” on the first day of the would-be festival.

The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism offered a “heartfelt apology” to Fyre attendees who had traveled for the event, saying in a statement that “tourism is our number one industry” and that they were “extremely disappointed” in the way the festival had unfolded:

We are extremely disappointed in the way the events unfolded yesterday with the Fyre Festival. We offer a heartfelt apology to all who traveled to our country for this event.  Tourism is our number one industry and it is our aim to deliver world-class experiences and events. Hundreds of visitors to Exuma were met with total disorganization and chaos. The organizers of Fyre recently asked the Ministry of Tourism for support for their private event. The Ministry of Tourism is not an official sponsor of Fyre Festival. Given the magnitude of this undertaking, the MOT lent its support as we do with all international events. We offered advice and assisted with communications with other government agencies. The event organizers assured us that all measures were taken to ensure a safe and successful event but clearly they did not have the capacity to execute an event of this scale.  A team of Ministry of Tourism representatives is on the island to assist with the organization of a safe return of all Fyre Festival visitors. It is our hope that the Fyre Festival visitors would consider returning to the Islands Of The Bahamas in the future to truly experience all of our beauty.  

Complex's attempts to reach Fyre Festival reps Friday were not immediately successful.

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