Jay Z Shouts Out Meek Mill During 4:44 Show in Philadelphia

During the most recent stop on his 4:44 tour, HOV paid tribute to Meek Mill by calling out his unjust imprisonment and performing his hit track “Dreams and Nightmares (Intro).” While performing in Meek's hometown of Philadelphia on Friday, Jay told the crowd, “That man is being stomped by the system. That man is in jail for doing wheelies and breaking up a fight.” 

 

Many fans in attendance, in addition to Trey Songz and Yo Gotti, were seen sporting “Free Meek” merch at the Wells Fargo center Friday night. Jay added “Free Meek” before playing the same intro he performed alongside the Philly native during Made in America in September. Similar to the crowd's reaction when Meek surprisingly joined Jay on stage, the Philly concertgoers lost it when Jay brought out the intro to Dreams and Nightmares

 

Tonight was LEGENDARY #FREEMEEKMILL @MEEKMILL

A post shared by Lil Nizzy – GLOWING (@lilnizzyd4s) on Dec 1, 2017 at 10:01pm PST

During his show at the Wells Fargo Center, Jay reminded the crowd of how Colin Kaepernick shed light on the racist institutions that continue to target people of color. “That shit is not about inanimate objects. It’s about people dying. It’s about young people leaving their house and never coming back home. And it’s not a black and white issue. It’s a human issue. Everybody should be fighting that.” HOV has been very vocal about his opinion regarding Meek's imprisonment. In an op-ed he wrote in the New York Times, Jay wrote about the unjust racial prejudices that prompted Meek's sentencing.

You can check out footage from Jay's performance above.

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Floyd Mayweather Accuses Ex-Girlfriend of Stealing Money From Him in New Lawsuit

According to TMZ, a lawsuit Floyd Mayweather just filed against his former girlfriend Shantel Jackson sees the undefeated boxer alleging that Jackson funded several personal shopping sprees for herself by gaining unauthorized access to his credit card accounts, in addition to taking cash that was scattered around his house. He also says that, in an effort to keep her spending a secret, she had several items that she purchased shipped to a secret location.

In a bizarre twist, Mayweather's suit says that Jackson praised him in public whenever he got crappy press for the sole purpose of gaining his trust. “As a result of that confidence, Mayweather, whose education ended at eighth grade, did not audit or otherwise inspect either his cash or his credit card statements for theft by Jackson,” it reads, though the boxer's reps later clarified that he actually left school four years later, in the 12th grade.

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Finally the claim says that Mayweather only learned of the alleged deceit when one of their mutual friends informed him that Jackson was bragging about it. Though there no specific dollar amount is available, Mayweather is suing her for theft. He says he wants “triple damages.” As if that wasn't complicated enough, she's also suing him for a number of things, including invasion of privacy, defamation, and domestic violence, the last of which is expected to get a trial date in the very near future.

Jackson first sued Mayweather back in 2014, where she alleged that he choked her during an argument, accused her publicly of aborting their twins, and pointed a gun at her head. The couple had a romantic relationship that lasted for eight years, and they lived together from 2008-2013.

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Cam’ron Claps Back at Mase With New Diss Track “Dinner Time”

 

 
 

Cam'ron didn't take long to respond to Mase's diss track “The Oracle” as he unleashes “Dinner Time” Saturday night.

The Harlem MC and Diplomats representative teased the The Heatmakerz-produced record on Instagram following the release of “The Oracle” and also made the claim that Mase was running a ponzi scheme when he transitioned out of rap to work as a pastor. Cam touches on that in “Dinner Time,” as well as calls into question Mase's true roots to Harlem:

“Why you talking Harlem? You from Jacksonville, Florida
I used to give you all my clothes don't you forget you was bummy
I fed you when you was hungry, that's just dummy
But the shit he said next, I swear it ain't funny 
Said kid, 'I'm a deacon, them deacons be getting money'
That's blasphemous, word to Jesus and Lazarus
You got bad karma, stay away, he hazardous
Collection plate, money in his pocket, he a klepto

There's also a line that's a direct response to Mase claiming Cam had sex with his own sister. “I ain't got a sister, only sister I fucked was yours,” Cam raps. For what it's worth, Mase's sister previously denied that happened.

 

@rsvpmase’s sister said @mr_camron lying about sleeping with her lol… See previous post

A post shared by FAMEOLOUS (@fameolousig) on Nov 24, 2017 at 7:29pm PST

Cam also alleges Mase ​was involved in some type of sexual activity with a dildo at Puff Daddy's house, who Mase has been aligned with since the Bad Boy days in the late '90s. “So you gon' tell me when you was staying with Puff, and I came over there and used the bathroom there wasn't a dildo on the sink?”

“Hope Y'all enjoy da facts,” Cam'ron wrote on IG. “No fake sisters..etc.. just da dildos on ya sink, when u was living wit puff, the Cory Wright, rock from Jefferson, and blinky blink, slaps etc. now go back home to Florida.”

Check out “Dinner Time” above.

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Jay Z Cancels Two Shows on 4:44 Tour Due to Technical Difficulties

Jay Z’s 4:44 Tour won’t make it to Lincoln, Nebraska, after all.

On Friday, the rapper released a statement explaining he was forced to cancel the Dec. 6 show because of “technical difficulties.” The production crew apparently deemed it “impossible” to set up the screens in The Pinnacle Bank Arena. It’s disappointing news, to say the least, but fans won’t be completely screwed over. According to the Omaha World Herald, all tickets will be fully refunded at the point of purchase.

“Due to the scale of this production, we cannot get the screens up on time into the building in Nebraska. This tour is too important to me to do it halfway. I have to cancel the show,” he wrote. “I respect you guys too much to take the money and run. Peace, Hov.”

Jay said he had to cancel a Fresno concert earlier this month for the same reason.

The 4:44 concert kicked off in late October and will include stops in Philadelphia, Chicago, Seattle, and Oakland, before wrapping up Dec. 21 in Inglewood, California.  

 

Moment of clarity #JayZ

A post shared by Rap Radar (@rapradar) on Nov 24, 2017 at 4:23pm PST

Jay’s 4:44 Tour has nabbed several headlines in recent weeks. During his show in Cleveland, the rapper pointed to a child in the audience and reassured her she could be president one day. Shortly before that, he used his time on stage to speak on the NFL protests and the injustices in our country.

“I want y’all to understand…when people are kneeling and putting their fists up and doing what they’re doing, it’s not about the flag. It’s about justice. It’s about injustice,” he told the crowd in Miami. “And that’s not a black or a white thing. It’s a human issue. It’s a human issue. Everybody should feel the same way. If your 16-year-old child left the house and didn’t come back, everyone should be affected. That’s not a black or a white issue. That’s a human issue. That’s a young person who lost their life senselessly.”

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Woman With ‘F*ck Trump’ Truck Sticker Has Been Arrested

A Texas woman’s pickup truck received national attention this month because of the large and profane decal that read: “FUCK TRUMP AND FUCK YOU FOR VOTING FOR HIM.” Of course, this message was pissing a lot of people off in the Lone Star state, so much so that local authorities were considering charging the owner—identified as Karen Fonseca—with disorderly conduct. On Thursday, Fonseca was arrested.

According to Houston’s KHOU, the woman was taken into custody for an outstanding warrant. She posted bond and was released shortly after.

“I had just bought me soup was going to go to the house. I turn around and he says, ‘I'm not going to put handcuffs on you. I'll follow you to your house, park your truck and come with us,’” Karen Fonseca said after her release. “I go, 'A warrant? I've been doing background checks recently, and they've all come out clear.’”

The warrant stems from a 2015 incident in which Fonseca was accused of fraudulent possession or use of identifying information. The case was reported reviewed in July of this year, when the warrant was issued.

Fonseca said she was convinced her politics played a part in her arrest.

“I'm almost certain it does have to do with this,” she said. “People abuse the badge, and in my opinion, money talks. When you're in politics, people know how to work the system.”

The women’s truck went viral after Bend County Sheriff Troy E. Nehls posted an image of it on Facebook asking the public to identify the owner. He wrote: “I have received numerous calls regarding the offensive display on this truck as it is often seen along FM 359. If you know who owns this truck or it is yours, I would like to discuss it with you. Our Prosecutor has informed us she would accept Disorderly Conduct charges regarding it, but I feel we could come to an agreement regarding a modification to it.”

After many people and organizations, including the ACLU, accused him of ignoring First Amendment rights, Nehls insisted he wasn’t trying to censor the owner; he just wanted to “prevent a potential altercation between the truck driver and those offended by the message.”

Foresca and her husband, Mike Foresca, told KHOU they don’t intend to remove the decal.

“No plans to take it down,” Mike Foresca said. “Unless he can show me where it says that in the law book, it's not coming down until the weather takes it down or I replace it with something else.”

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Creek Boyz Are Going Global With Positivity, Unity, and the Contagious Hit “With My Team”

In today's hip-hop, the group mentality has become almost non-existent amongst artists and fans alike. Most groups today center around one star act and when a group manages to hold it together like the Migos, we as fans encourage them to break apart and release solo work. Groups like Wu-Tang Clan, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, and A Tribe Called Quest all had their rough patches, but they all maintained a balance and there were rarely points where one member completely separated himself from the group to a point of no return. Baltimore rap group Creek Boyz plan to bring the concept of unity back to the forefront of hip-hop.

Earlier this year, Turk P. Diddy, Fedi Mula, J. Reezy, and ETS Breeze built a huge buzz with their single, “With My Team.” The song took off online and was actually was the first song the four members ever recorded together as a unit. They've formed an unbreakable bond since then, both on and off-record, to the point where they even stack their vocals in the studio and record at the same time, in the same booth. Today, the group is here with a revamped video for their breakout hit and also spoke to us about their impact and the importance of teamwork.

How did you all come together?

Turk P. Diddy: The music, that's what brought us together initially. I met Fetty back in middle school. We consider each other brothers from another mother, for real. That's what we call each other.

How long have you guys been making music together?

Fedi Mula: I'd say about a year and a half but we didn't all really come together as one at first. It was more like J Reezy and Breeze had their thing and me and Turk had our thing and then we just brought it all together and named it Creek Boyz.

When did you bring it together, on “With My Team?”

All: Yessir!

Who influenced you guys growing up? I saw you guys mention Gucci Mane, Styles P, and The Lox before.

Turk: My parents really influenced me, because of the struggles I had to go through at home. My grandmother, she's the one that had passed away, she influenced me. She was the first person in my family to actually tell me to pursue this career even when everybody else in the family was like, “Nah, don't be a rapper, be something else.” Family influenced us.

J. Reezy: Musical influences would have to be Yo Gotti, Gucci Mane, Three 6 Mafia.

Turk: J Cole, Fab, Nas, and Biggie. That's all I'm here for, that's all of my music, fam.

Breeze: My big brother, my brother played the drums, we were always musically inclined. We used to go to church and stuff like that. So we kind of carried that over to the street and eventually we mixed everything. Growing up I listened to Dru Hill, Al Green, Teddy Pendergrass—that's where we get the old school from.

Fedi: I grew up with music, born into the family of it. Everybody, like my whole family was trying to do music at one point. So, it just was what it was. It was a natural attraction. By the time I got eight, nine years old, I sung in my elementary choir, Woodland Elementary with Ms. Otis. I got kicked out two years later, so I started rapping. My older brother did everything, he was always making beats on Fruity Loops. He played a big influence. As far as musical influences, Michael Jackson, number one, 2Pac, number two, and then I like all the groups going nuts like the Temptations.

You guys shout out kids a lot in your interviews and stuff, do you think that most of your fans are younger?

Turk: That's what I see, yeah.

Fedi: We’re influencing all of the young'uns coming up right now.

Does that affect the kind of music that you guys record?  

Turk: Yeah, we got to make sure stuff is kid-friendly, PG-13 type of lyrics. I mean, I still go crazy, but I try not to. You gotta keep pushing it in a different way.

So no more “Keep Them Freaks Out.”

Turk: Let 'em keep them freaks out the house. [LaughsNah, you're gonna still get that, still get that aesthetic!

The whole world was built on teamwork, but everybody says they did it by themselves.

How do you guys pick who's gonna be on each song? Is it open to everybody or do you work together separately and then come together with different songs?

Breeze: Every song and everything we do usually comes natural. So if one of us comes up with a hook or a song, we all try and flow but some people it comes naturally in certain types of songs. We don't force nothing, everything we do comes genuinely. Usually we vibe separately and then come to the studio, bring it all together, and that's what makes the masterpiece.

Whose idea was it to stack vocals like that and have all four of you singing into the microphone at the same time?

Fedi: Our producer. That's our style, that's our new genre of music.

How have you guys adjusted to the music industry? Have you gotten to meet any people involved in the industry, like other rappers and stuff like that?

Turk: Fetty Wap, Trey Songz, Gotti. A couple other artists on 300 like Tee Grizzley, TK Kravitz.

Fedi: The music industry just has encouraged us to all be on the same page so we can show them all that this team is really a team.

Turk: None of that funny stuff. Show them the unity in the group.

What’s in store for 2018?

J. Reezy: Albums, solo projects, tour, merch, awards, more money. [Laughs] That’s just me brainstorming. I’m gonna keep it 100 with you, where we’re from, I’d feel lucky to be alive next year. Anything could happen. Our main focus is to get to 2018.

How important is it that you have such a strong following amongst kids in your environment, knowing the potential dangers both you and them face on a day-to-day basis?

Fedi: It’s a huge impact. Especially just being able to work together as a team. The whole world was built on teamwork, but everybody says they did it by themselves.

Breeze: I agree.

Turk: Let me give you a quick story. A little boy was rapping to me, trying to freestyle, but the only thing he could rap about was killing and shooting. So I asked him why and he said, “I only rap about it because everyone else talks about it.”

So what we’re doing right now is setting a positive example. There’s a lot of tension going on in our city. The power that we have is the power to change these kids’ perceptions on life. Instead of being a drug dealer you can be a doctor, a nurse, a ball player… or a rapper!

 

A post shared by Pigeons & Planes (@pigsandplans) on Nov 14, 2017 at 8:27am PST

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Cam’ron Calls Out Kanye for the Way He Handled Jay Z Feud

This time last week, all we knew was that Cam'ron was dropping his latest mixtape. After gracing ComplexCon over the weekend (with a gang of puppies), we didn't know WHAT to expect from Cam's new project, The Program, although he did drop some hints at the material he'd be releasing, posting on Instagram earlier this week that he was “on some bullshit on this joint,” then warning “If u emotional don't listen.” Who was thinking that this meant he had some lines ready for Kanye West?

On the mixtape's fourth track, “Coleslaw,” Cam starts things off speaking about the situation between Kanye West and Jay Z, which rose back into conversation via Hov's “Kill Jay Z” on 4:44. After saying “you don't like it when I'm nice. You only like it when I'm ignorant, so that's exactly what you get,” Cam went in.

Kanye got on stage, what he do? Play Jay-Z out
What he do next? Check into the crazy house?
Fuck that, you made a living talking greasy
Besides that, man, you Yeezy with the Yeezys
Be yourself, you ain't gotta go AWOL
And fuck that, 'Ye, I been that way since yay tall
If you regret it, then dead it, but if you said it, you said it

It's hard to tell what made Cam address the situation, aside from a longstanding (and still extant) antagonism towards Hov. No matter what, it's an interesting verse. On one hand, Cam appears to be throwing shots at Kanye, but on the other hand, Killa Cam is also encouraging 'Ye to stand behind his words.

Interesting times, either way. Check out The Program for more of Cam's fire.

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Meek Mill Sentenced to 2-4 Years in Prison for Probation Violation

On Monday afternoon Meek Mill was given a sentence of 2-4 years in prison after a judge ruled that he violated multiple provisions of his probation.

The 30-year-old rapper was on probation due to a 2008 conviction for gun and drug charges. For those charges, he did an eight month bid (in addition to the probation sentence). Also, in 2016, he was placed under 90 days of house arrest for violating that probation after embarking in some unapproved travel.

According to a TMZ report that was released last week, this most current violation was likely to earn him a sentence in the neighborhood of 20 months (which appears to be pretty accurate).

We will update this post with more information as it becomes available.

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André 3000: ‘When I Pass Away, People Will Find Hours and Hours of Files’

André 3000 interviews are few and far between, so whenever the celebrated rapper steps into the limelight for a convo on his latest happenings, it always feels like an event of sorts. His new Q&A with GQ Style is no different.

André sat down with the magazine’s Editor-in-Chief, Will Welch, for a lengthy talk about where he’s at musically, what he has in the vault, and why his longtime Outkast partner Big Boi is a better rapper than him.

The discussion also touched on a pretty entertaining topic: André, inspired by buying a bootleg Anita Baker shirt, wants to spearhead her official merch line.

On a more personal note, the ATLien revealed the one regret he would have if he died today. “Here’s the only thing that I would regret: Man, you know, there is still that album that you wanted to do.”

André previously told Complex he would be at peace if Outkast never dropped another album, and also compared rap to boxing. Here, he used Floyd Mayweather’s career as an analogy for his own.

Check out some choice excerpts below, and head over to GQ Style (the Holiday issue is available on newsstands now) where André also talks about his parents (both have passed) and his partnership with Tretorn.

On being at the end of his music career

It’s Mayweather. He knows. He’s like, yeah, I can fight maybe three more of ’em. But I’m slowing down, and I see these young kids coming up and I was them. And at a certain point, no matter how Mayweather you are, I think it’s classy to be like, you know what? [brushes off hands].

I think I have, like, maybe two more Mayweather fights… Or maybe one.

On what he’s got in his music vault

When I pass away, people will find hours and hours of files…hard drives and shit. It’s hard drives of me just in the house alone playing horrible guitar. Me playing piano. Me playing a little sax. I was trying to find out: What can I be excited about? Because I never was, to me, a great producer or a great writer or a great rapper. I always felt that I was less than everybody else, so I fought harder.

On why he believes Big Boi is the better rapper

When you watch early Outkast videos, Big Boi’s the leader. He always had the confidence, where I was kind of like the shy one. Big Boi can rap better than me—I always said that. If somebody said, “Pick who you want from Outkast to go to battle with you,” it wouldn’t be me. ’Cause like, what I’ma do? Say some mind shit? You can’t have thoughts in a battle—nobody gives a shit about that.

On feeling out of the loop with the current sound of rap

I hate going to the studio. So what’s got me going once again is me being excited about other artists. I’ve been working on producing a few artists. A couple projects. But here’s the crazy thing: I don’t have the pulse anymore. Rhythms change every generation. The intensity and the drums change. And I’m not on the pulse. I can’t pretend. It’s kinda like watching your uncle dance. So the only thing I can do is this kind of novelty, off thing for them.

For me, hip-hop is about freshness. You can always hop, but you won’t always be hip.

On his plans to start an Anita Baker T-shirt line

I’m an artist, and I’m buying bootleg shirts of another artist, so I felt bad. So I was like, maybe, so my conscience feels good, let me try to find an address for Anita and send her a little check. And it’ll be a joke, like, “Anita, I just bought these shirts, I feel bad about it, here’s $50.” Then I started thinking, wouldn’t it be great to design a line of Anita Baker tees and present the line to Anita? Maybe she needs some merch.

If she says no, hey, it’s fine. It was just an idea. There’s no way to lose here.

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