Man Suing Cardi B Over Mixtape Cover Is Reportedly Trying to Extort Her

Late last year, a model accused rapper Cardi B of using his image as part of the artwork for her debut mixtape, Gangsta Bitch Music Vol. 1., also filing a lawsuit to the tune of five million in damages. She hasn't said much about the situation or suit before, but in documents obtained by The Blast, Cardi B and her team are certain the man suing her, Kevin Brophy, is trying to extort her.

“Whatever piece of Cardi B’s income he can gouge out, and whatever free ride on her famous coattails he can gain, through extortionate means of this unfounded, preposterous action,” the documents say. Her team also states that since Brophy is never named or identified in the album's artwork, there isn't any harm being done.

While the back tattoos tattoos do look strikingly similar, the design itself may have been digitally lifted and placed on the model who actually is in the photo. This makes a lot of sense considering Cardi's legal team called the photo “a classic example of transformative work created in the exercise of the First Amendment rights of the photographer.”

It's also possible a different person has the same ink themselves, especially since one huge difference, Cardi notes, is that the model on her artwork doesn't have the same “Born to Lose” neck tattoo as Brophy. TMZ reported that Cardi also clarified the man on the cover is a “young, black man,” while the Brophy is white. At the time the album dropped, she posted other images from the same shoot showing a model that is definitely not Brophy.

The rapper wants the case against her dropped as soon as possible.

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Tomi Lahren Is Getting Roasted for Completely Missing the Point of March for Our Lives

Famous clout chaser right-wing pundit Tomi Lahren is getting slammed on social media for dishing out some insensitive comments about March for Our Lives, a student-organized gun control rally (March 24th) sparked by the Parkland school shooting that claimed 17 lives. As hundreds of thousands of protestors (some of whom have lost family, colleagues, and loved ones due to senseless gun violence) took to the streets, the conservative commentator did what she does best: tweet.

“Simply being anti-NRA is not a solution. March FOR something, not just against everything,” she tweeted in an attempt to diminish the movement. “Disarming the citizenry is the first step to oppression and tyranny. Kids, I suggest you crack open the history book and learn this pattern. #marchforourlives.”

People on Twitter swiftly reminded Lahren of the glaringly obvious point she missed, which is that the march is actually “for” the protection of innocent lives (as evidenced by the name.)

The backlash, of course, didn't stop Lahren from running her pro-gun rhetoric into the ground. She continues to tweet boilerplate messaging in support of the NRA and the second amendment, suggesting that any step toward gun control is one step closer to tyranny. Unbelievable.

Thankfully, there were far more public figures supporting the rally than opposing it. Several famous names including Kanye West, Kim Kardashian, Amy Schumer, Paul McCartney, Ariana Grande, and Jaden and Willow Smith all touched down in Washington, D.C. to show support for the cause.

Meanwhile, Lahren is promoting a sweet new line gun-friendly athletic wear in case you need to pull out your piece on the way to yoga.

 

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Woman With ‘F*ck Trump’ Truck Sticker Has Been Arrested

A Texas woman’s pickup truck received national attention this month because of the large and profane decal that read: “FUCK TRUMP AND FUCK YOU FOR VOTING FOR HIM.” Of course, this message was pissing a lot of people off in the Lone Star state, so much so that local authorities were considering charging the owner—identified as Karen Fonseca—with disorderly conduct. On Thursday, Fonseca was arrested.

According to Houston’s KHOU, the woman was taken into custody for an outstanding warrant. She posted bond and was released shortly after.

“I had just bought me soup was going to go to the house. I turn around and he says, ‘I'm not going to put handcuffs on you. I'll follow you to your house, park your truck and come with us,’” Karen Fonseca said after her release. “I go, 'A warrant? I've been doing background checks recently, and they've all come out clear.’”

The warrant stems from a 2015 incident in which Fonseca was accused of fraudulent possession or use of identifying information. The case was reported reviewed in July of this year, when the warrant was issued.

Fonseca said she was convinced her politics played a part in her arrest.

“I'm almost certain it does have to do with this,” she said. “People abuse the badge, and in my opinion, money talks. When you're in politics, people know how to work the system.”

The women’s truck went viral after Bend County Sheriff Troy E. Nehls posted an image of it on Facebook asking the public to identify the owner. He wrote: “I have received numerous calls regarding the offensive display on this truck as it is often seen along FM 359. If you know who owns this truck or it is yours, I would like to discuss it with you. Our Prosecutor has informed us she would accept Disorderly Conduct charges regarding it, but I feel we could come to an agreement regarding a modification to it.”

After many people and organizations, including the ACLU, accused him of ignoring First Amendment rights, Nehls insisted he wasn’t trying to censor the owner; he just wanted to “prevent a potential altercation between the truck driver and those offended by the message.”

Foresca and her husband, Mike Foresca, told KHOU they don’t intend to remove the decal.

“No plans to take it down,” Mike Foresca said. “Unless he can show me where it says that in the law book, it's not coming down until the weather takes it down or I replace it with something else.”

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Donald Trump Only Supports Free Speech When It’s White People Speaking

Donald Trump is not slick. He thinks he is, but he's not. For one, President U. Bum still hasn't figured out how to thread tweets.

Exhibit A: this disjointed, idiotic statement he made over the weekend about the legal, peaceful NFL demonstrations against police brutality and racism, which started with the still-unemployed Colin Kaepernick. After calling them “sons of bitches,” Trump insisted that players exercising their First Amendment rights be fired for “disrespect” to the national anthem and flag. 

Because America is already (somewhat) great, that statement was met with even more player protests, some of which included the very owners Trump attempted to appeal to. But that didn't stop him from doubling down on his stance Monday, insisting 1) it wasn't about race; and 2) that players not be vocal or demonstrative about their legitimate criticisms of this country's fucked-up, systematic, race-based issues.

Trump is mindbogglingly inconsistent in his support or criticism of free speech. But, as it turns out, he's pretty damn consistent with when he chooses to be critical. Instead of telling you, I'll just show you.

Trump had a busy weekend on Twitter; in addition to dropping his unsolicited opinion about the NFL, he announced he was rescinding his White House visit offer to Steph Curry, leaving Curry's team, the Golden State Warriors, with no choice but to decline the visit as a unit.

Even though Trump attributed the reason for the withdrawal to Curry's “hesitation,” the basketball star had been made it abundantly clear that his stance is unwavering against Trump and his dangerous rhetoric. It's pretty safe to assume Trump's decision was made in response to Curry's personal opinion, which he has every right to vocalize.

And then there's the incredibly messy case of ESPN correspondent Jemele Hill's recent criticism of Trump. In a conversation on Twitter, Hill unabashedly (and correctly) called Trump a white supremacist.

In retaliation, the Trump administration, via White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, recommended Hill be fired.

“I think that's one of the more outrageous comments that anyone can make,” Sanders said during a press briefing, “and certainly something that I think is a fireable offense by ESPN.”

What do the aforementioned presidentially shunned figures have in common? Yep, that's right: they're all people of color. Keep that in mind. Let's press on.

In contrast, Trump praised figures in the NASCAR industry Monday for saying anyone who protests in the sport would be fired, effectively quashing members' rights to demonstrate peacefully.

You don't need Google to know that NASCAR is one of, if not the whitest sport in the world. But in case you need some context: this summer, Darrell “Bubba” Wallace Jr. became the first black driver to race at NASCAR's top level in more than a decade. The reason he made it in? He replaced another driver, who was injured in a wreck. So, here we have Donald, supporting the very white NASCAR owners and corporate leaders, for making it clear that they don't support free speech. Got it.

But wait a minute. Let's go back to February, when Trump threatened U.C. Berkley with the revocation of federal funds because they did not “allow free speech.” In this instance, Trump tweeted in defense of former Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos, whose inflammatory, racist speeches regularly incite riots and violent protests.  

But wait a minute, take two: just last month, Trump tweeted in support of protestors in Boston, who counter-demonstrated against a self-described free speech rally that was held one week after the convening of white supremacists in Charlottesville that turned deadly.

Hmm… what is it about Boston that makes it different than say, Ferguson or Baltimore? Why might Trump be more willing to support protestors there?

Looking a little funny in the light there, President Bum.

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