Vic Mensa, Fat Joe, Stevie Wonder, and More Talk Disaster Relief at Tidal Charity Concert

The third annual Tidal X: Brooklyn charity concert took place Tuesday night, with special performances from Jay Z, Cardi B, DJ Khaled, Stevie Wonder, and more artists doing their part to raise money and awareness for those affected by recent natural disasters.

Complex News' Speedy Morman hit the red carpet at Tidal X: Brooklyn to chat with Vic Mensa, ASAP Ferg, Wonder, Lin-Manuel Miranda, and others who highlighted the importance of helping those in need. Check out those conversations and highlights from the concert above. 

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Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks Discuss Eminem’s Trump Diss on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska give a full breakdown of Eminem's BET Hip Hop Awards cypher verse where the Detroit legend took full aim at President Donald Trump. The crew also discuss the other cyphers from the BET Awards, including Fat Joe and 6lack. Additionally, Budden and Akademiks dive into the video of Birdman going off about the Lil Wayne situation. 

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Fat Joe, Remy Ma, and More Contribute to Tidal’s Hurricane Relief Efforts

Some of hip-hop’s biggest names came together Saturday to help the millions of people suffering in Puerto Rico.

The initiative was launched by Tidal earlier this week, after it announced plans to send 200,000 pounds of supplies to the hurricane-stricken island. The streaming service set up 19 drop-off locations around New York, where people could donate necessities like cases of water, non-perishable food, batteries, new and gently used clothing, hygiene products, diapers, and more.

“Tidal, in partnership with [New York] Governor Andrew Cuomo's Empire State Relief and Recovery Effort, has announced the start of the TIDAL X: Puerto Rico initiative with the charter of a cargo plane that will bring much needed supplies to aid in the recovery and relief in Puerto Rico,” the company wrote in statement.

Artists like Fat Joe, Remy Ma, Jadakiss, and Romeo Santos stopped by the drop-off locations Saturday to help collect, sort, and package the supplies. 

“As the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico grows, our brothers and sisters are desperate for our help. Please join myself, TIDAL, Governor Cuomo, and Ruben Diaz Jr. as we collect and transport much-needed supplies to the island,” Fat Joe said in a video earlier this week. “I thank you all from the bottom of my heart and I promise all these items will be delivered by ME personally to Puerto Rico. God bless.”

You can check out photos from the drop-off locations as well as PSA from participating artists below. To learn more about Tidal's relief efforts and how to donate, go to tidal.com/puertorico

Hot 97 helped organize an event for the community in The Bronx to bring supplies for Puerto Rico and Mexico as well.

 

NYC for Puerto Rico @revolttv love

A post shared by NOREAGA/DRINKCHAMPS (@therealnoreaga) on Sep 30, 2017 at 1:26pm PDT

 

The trucks are filling up! #PuertoRico #Mexico #helppuertorico #helpmexico #helpusvi

A post shared by HOT 97 (@hot97) on Sep 30, 2017 at 12:05pm PDT

 

@djcamilo x @blendonthewater #PUERTORICO HURRICANE MARIA RELIEF 🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽

A post shared by HOT 97 (@hot97) on Sep 30, 2017 at 5:28pm PDT

Proceeds from this year’s TIDAL X: BROOKLYN benefit concert will go toward organizations that support recovery from Puerto Rico. The concert will take place Oct. 17, and will include performances by Jay Z, Jennifer Lopez, Cardi B, DJ Khaled, and Fifth Harmony.

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What You Need to Know About the 25-Year-Old Douche Bro Behind Fyre Festival

For the last four or five days, your Twitter timeline has no doubt been inundated with the nightmare situation known as Fyre Festival, which went from being a $12,000-a-pop music festival for the rich, white elite to what looked like a disaster recovery situation (with actual disaster relief tents). In the fallout, it's been announced that Ja Rule and the squad behind the Fyre Festival is being hit with a $100 million class action lawsuit for their gross fuck up.

While it's been easy to chuck “Ja Rule The Scammer” tweets out there, it might be time to look at one of the other “names” on the Fyre Festival lawsuit; Billy McFarland. At 25, dude's already had his name affixed to a number of companies, primarily with an emphasis on millennials who want the finer things in life. He's one of those entrepreneurial guys who always seems to have a plan, and can apparently talk his way into a pile of money without truly delivering on his promises. A.k.a. the American way. Here's a look at Billy McFarland's pre-Fyre highlights.

McFarland's always been a businessman

When you were 13, you probably were trying to bag shorty in your math class; yung McFarland was already building his first startup, which apparently outsourced design work. A few years later, he was already dropping out of Bucknell University to found Spling, which at the time was another addition to the social networking space that secured $400,000 in funding back in 2011.

Neither of these startups caused as much havoc as his 2014 startup Magnises, which found McFarland creating his own black card (which after turned into an app, Magnises NOW) for millennials who were trying to get their IRL social status game up. It sounds dope, but apparently, you had to promise to spend $250,000 a year through the card (with a $250 annual fee) to get the Magnises perks like 24/7 concierge service, special treatment and discounts from elite brands and restaurants, and invites to exclusive events.

At the time, McFarland told Bloomberg that Magnises “enhances and really improves your everyday life in the city,” but in January of 2017, Business Insider reported that cardholders felt scammed, saying that the perks that Magnises promised (which included everything from Hamilton tickets to SR-22 plane rides to the Hamptons) were not being met. At the time, McFarland said Magnises “hit some roadblocks along the way, and that's what happens when you grow really quickly, and that's on me.” But McFarland's troubles weren't focused solely on Magnises' troubles.

McFarland trashed his $13,000-a-month West Village home

It's a given that when most young guys secure a bag, they might go ham with their earnings. According to the New York Post, in 2013 McFarland had a 500-person birthday party for photographer/socialite Patrick McMullan at his $13,750-a-month duplex on Greenwich Ave. This was one of many “blowout parties” that the landlord said caused roughly $62,000 worth of damage to the spot. At the time, the owner was looking for McFarland to pony up $100,000 in damages, but McFarland said the charges were “not valid.”

WTF is Fyre Media?

That's hard to say; according to LinkedIn, Fyre Media, Inc. was founded in 2015 is “an on demand service that makes booking the most influential celebrities, artists, athletes, models, and entertainers seamless and transparent.” They have an app, and it looks like some of their “exclusive” artists feature Fat Joe, Waka Flocka, Soulja Boy, Jim Jones, and Ja Rule. Rule, who has been listed as a co-founder of Fyre, is reportedly the “mastermind” behind the Fyre Festival, which McFarland was touting as a “luxury music festival” that was due to span two weekends (April 28-30, 2017 and May 5-7, 2017) in the Bahamas.

Aside from the musical acts, which were to include everyone from G.O.O.D. Music and Blink-182 to Disclosure and Lil Yachty, Fyre Festival was reportedly set to have $1 million worth of “hidden treasures” that would be found all over the island. It was also set to feature all kinds of rich, elite millennials attending, paying upwards of $12,000-a-pop to experience the music, art installations, talks, amazing food, and much more while chilling on the sands of Fyre Cay in the Bahamas.

As we now know, what the people got when they hit the island was the exact opposite of a “luxury music festival” experience, a day which McFarland told Rolling Stone was “definitely the toughest day” of his short, intriguing, possibly scam-filled life. It doesn't help that the festival appeared to be doomed from the start, with everything from “a rampant shark problem” and sandflies to the fucking FEMA tents and not having a stage(?!) setup revealed that Fyre was the dumpster fire it turned out to be from the rip.

McFarland also told Rolling Stone that “there will be make-up dates, May 2018 in the U.S., free for everybody who signed up for this festival,” although at this point, with his cache (and the social media shitstorm that followed the Fyre Festival) and that $100 million lawsuit looming over his head, what masochist would want to subject themselves to Fyre Festival, The Sequel?

Maybe McFarland needs to do what he does best: find new ways to rope money-hungry millennials into giving him more of their cheddar.

 

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