Cardi B Spent $300K Out of Pocket on Coachella Stage: ‘You Gotta Take That to the Chin’

Less than a week after the release of Invasion of Privacy, Cardi B's debut album is receiving critical and commercial success. It's clear she'll be sticking around for awhile, so she's taking steps to actively invest in her own future.

During a new interview with Sirius XM, Cardi says she'll actually be taking a financial loss this year at Coachella after spending $300,000 of her own money on her stage set. She explains the festival was booked last year, when she wasn't as popular as she is now, so the pay isn't as high as it could be—but she's cool with the situation.

“We booked Coachella like six or seven months ago,” she notes. “So, I'm getting paid for Coachella like 70 [thousand] a day. I've been booked for this. Then it's like, I have to invest so much money on my stage set—my own money that I have to go to Wells Fargo and write a check. It's crazy. Almost $300,000.”

Cardi says she didn't initially realize how big of a deal Coachella was, but now she's willing to spend some of her own money on making the experience as memorable as possible. “It's an investment,” she says. “You've got to take that. You've got to take that to the chin.” Then she joked, “But it's like, 'Dammit. Right after I finished paying my damn taxes.”

During her interview with Sirius, she also spoke about being blown away by all the positive words coming from unexpected places. Cardi says she can't believe artists like Green Day, Sam Smith, Logic, and Erykah Badu have been reaching out with encouragement. She also revealed that Bono was a fan.

“When I did the Grammys, I got a note from Bono,” she explains. “I've got it in my house in a special place where my awards are at and everything, because it's freakin' Bono.”

On a heavy press run this week following the release of her album, Cardi also stopped by Sway in the Morning and talked about how the pressure of success has added anxiety to the recording process.

“At first when I was doing music, it was fun, and I was so eager to get in the studio all the time,” she tells Sway Calloway. “Now, I get anxiety when I go to the studio because everybody is expecting some crazy, amazing magic from me. I want to give you all what I like at the time. I don't want pressure. Stop expecting that everything is going to be a No. 1. Stop comparing me to another person.”

Cardi says the pressure has made music start to feel like a job. “It really has become a job. I don't like that. I don't like to feel like I'm obligated and having a hard time at work. Like, I used to be a dancer and I was having a good time. It didn't even sometimes feel like work.”

You can watch her full Sway interview below, in which she also discusses what she learned about money, Offset’s musical advice, and how she came up with the title for her album.

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Q-Tip Will Teach a Music Course at NYU

Q-Tip, rap legend from A Tribe Called Quest, will become a teacher. Q-Tip will be joining NYU‘s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music to teach a course that will “explore historical, social, and musical connections between jazz and hip-hop,” according to NYU's website. The lucky students who will take this class can expect “in-class and out-of-class assignments under Q-Tip’s mentorship.” Grammy-winning journalist and producer Ashley Kahn will join Q-Tip as a professor for the course, which will begin Sept. 5.

The course will span seven classes, where students will be studying techniques of music and the “fused musical genres” of the Last Poets, Stetsasonic, A Tribe Called Quest, Public Enemy, The Roots, Lauryn Hill, and Kendrick Lamar. The class will cover artists of the '70s, '80's, '90's, “and beyond.”

“I couldn’t be more excited to share with the students what I know and I look forward to them also teaching me. Teaching is an exchange of sharing and receiving for all involved,” said Q-Tip in a statement on NYU's website.

Q-Tip has been keeping busy lately: He recently did a reading of Nelson George's play My Funny Valentine at Joe's Pub in New York City, where he starred and played Miles Davis. A Tribe Called Quest just released their “final” video for the We got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your service opening cut “The Space Program.” The video, directed by Warren Fu, features cameos from Erykah Badu, Vince Staples, Pharrell, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rosario Dawson, Janelle Monáe, Alicia Keys, Anderson .Paak, and more.

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It Sounds Like Takeoff and Carnage Have a Joint Mixtape Headed Our Way

It’s no wonder Migos considers themselves the “biggest group ever.” This week alone, the Atlanta trio released their highly anticipated Culture II album, launched an apparel collection at Bloomingdale’s, and will potentially walk away with multiple Grammys on Sunday. It’s clear Migos is on top of the world right now; however, it sounds like one of its members is gearing up to release a side project. And, no, we’re not talking about Quavo again.

On the same day Culture II dropped, DJ/producer Carnage announced he and Takeoff had a collaborative mixtape in the stash. He announced the project on social media, accompanied by a screenshot of his and Takeoff’s Facetime conversation. 

Carnage linked up with Migos for his 2015 debut album Papi Gordo. The hip-hop EDM producer also released a number of collaborative projects throughout last year: one was the Young Martha mixtape with Young Thug, and the other was the Step Brothers EP with G-Eazy. Carnage is also preparing to release another studio album in the upcoming months, which he says is filled with big-name features, including Takeoff.

“I’m really excited. I put a lot of time in to it,” he said on Power 106’s The Cruz Show this month. “I have a mixture of, like, everybody. You’re going to be blown away.”

While we wait for more information about Takeoff and Carnage’s joint effort, you can check out Culture II on Apple Music and iTunes. The album has already received plenty of love from a wide range of fans as well as the restaurant chain Wingstop. (LOL.)

Gucci Mane also appeared to enjoy Culture II, as he referred to Takeoff as his favorite rapper shortly after the album dropped. 

 

Culture 2 out @yrntakeoff my fav rapper now!!!

A post shared by Gucci Mane (@laflare1017) on Jan 26, 2018 at 8:34am PST

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Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks Debate If Cardi B Is Getting Fake Love for Going No. 1 on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska run through the day of news, including a reaction to Cardi B's “Bodak Yellow” going No. 1. They crew try to determine if some of the love coming her way is fake. Later on the show, they break down Chance the Rapper's new song, with Budden offering up some criticism about the track. Budden and Akademiks also react to Erykah Badu's “For the Dick” challenge and ponder whether they should do their own. 

 

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The Story Behind Childish Gambino’s ‘Awaken, My Love!’ Album Cover

Late last year, Childish Gambino returned to music with Awaken, My Love! The album made headlines for its classic funk sound, stark departure from Gambino's previous work, and its album cover. The cover is dominated by a face frozen—whether that face is feeling ecstasy, fear, or new life is hard to say.

The face is wreathed in an intricate, bone-like headdress designed by WXYZ Jewelry, a Brooklyn design shop led by Laura Wass. She started the company five years ago, and the brand quickly carved out a niche for its instantly recognizable geodesic dome structures. Wass has had her pieces appear in Beyoncé's “7/11” video, been commissioned to make work for Erykah Badu, and the requests have only increased with time. Something in her sculptural jewelry has struck a chord in the music industry, and the Gambino album cover was one of their most prominent placements yet.

Better yet, Wass didn't even know it was coming. “It came as a total surprise,” she said. “The piece was originally meant for another artist… we had even made a body cage to go with it.” When the artwork was released, her phone started blowing up. Not a bad ending for a headdress that was originally meant for another artist. We went to Wass' Bushwick studio to get a glimpse of her process, and hear how her work has infiltrated the upper crust of the music industry. 

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