Chris Brown Could Get Up to 6 Months in Jail for His Pet Capuchin

Chris Brown may be heading back to jail.

The 28-year-old R&B star posted an adorable video (below) last month of his daughter, Royalty, holding their pet baby monkey, Fiji. However, not everyone thought the scene was cute. Some of Breezy's followers voiced concern about dangers of the three-year-old being next to the exotic Capuchin monkey and called up the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to report the pop star.

While Brown isn't in trouble for bringing his daughter and the exotic animal together, the Fish and Wildlife team discovered that Brown didn't have the proper permits to house the Capuchin monkey. Because of this, he can face up to six months in jail.

TMZ reports that Brown immediately turned Fiji over to the authorities when they turned up at his house with a search warrant. Now, his case sits with L.A.'s City Attorney who will be seeing Brown's lawyer, Mark Geragos, ASAP. Geragos also spoke with TMZ and criticized the city for “using taxpayer money on investigating monkey business.”

“As I leave my office in downtown L.A. and walk past people sleeping on the street on my way to defend people charged by the City Attorney with selling medical marijuana … now spending taxpayer money on investigating monkey business, this completes the circle on his absurdity,” he said.

The Capuchin monkey, which originates from Costa Rica's jungles, is one of the most popular animals in entertainment and is often seen in films like The Hangover 2 and Pirates of the Caribbean as well as on TV shows, like Ross' famous pet on Friends.

More from Complex

Steve Kerr Goes Off on LaVar Ball and Calls Him ‘the Kardashian of the NBA’

Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr has had about enough of LaVar Ball. Prior to the Warriors' game against the Denver Nuggets on Monday, Kerr went on a rant, blasting the media, specifically ESPN, for their coverage of LaVar and the entire Ball family. “Somewhere, I guess in Lithuania, LaVar Ball is laughing,” he said. “People are eating out of his hands for no apparent reason, other than that he's become the Kardashian of the NBA or something. That sells, and that's what is true in politics, entertainment and now in sports. It doesn't matter if there's any substance involved in an issue.” 

Kerr's problem with the Worldwide Leader in Sports in all of this is that, not too long, ESPN laid off a number of journalists who covered the NBA and provided substance by writing about the X's and O's of the game of basketball. However, all of that has gone out of the window, in favor of what Kerr refers to as “sensationalized news.” 

“You can see they’re not playing for Luke no more,” Ball said of Los Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton. “Luke doesn’t have control of the team no more. They don’t want to play for him.” LaVar's remarks must have struck a chord with Kerr since Walton served as an assistant coach under him for the Warriors from 2014 to 2016. 

It's the second time in as many days where an NBA head coach has criticized ESPN for giving LaVar a platform. On Sunday, Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle called the article where LaVar ripped Walton a “disgrace,” adding that ESPNshould back up the coaches.” 

Watch Kerr's rant regarding Ball, ESPN, and the media below. 

More from Complex

How Scooter Braun Went From Promoting Parties to Building an Entertainment Empire | Blueprint

Scooter Braun is a visionary for the self-made, social media age. After catching the eye of Jermaine Dupri as the hottest young party promoter in Atlanta, Braun signed and diligently broke Asher Roth and Justin Bieber. He went on to manage a bevy of global pop stars to expand his company into other facets of entertainment and to weather some very public storms, all while gathering a following as big as some of his acts.

In our new episode of Blueprint with Complex's Editor-in-Chief Noah Callahan-Bever, Braun shares the vision and journey that helped him become one of the most powerful players in entertainment, and he's still not done.

Watch the full interview above and subscribe to Complex to catch upcoming episodes of Blueprint

More from Complex

Rick Ross Reveals Plans for Movie Collaboration With Gucci Mane

The 2016 video for Rick Ross, Gucci Mane and 2 Chainz’s “Buy Back the Block” may have contained a big clue about Ross’ next move in the entertainment industry. That nearly eight-minute-long clip found Ross and Gucci Mane at odds with a property owner leasing them land for a car wash startup, before the duo eventually sets their sights on an entire block of real estate.

“I am getting ready to shoot a film,” Ross recently told Tashara Jones of PageSix.com. “I got two different flicks that I am ready to make a move on. Me and Gucci Mane got a flick that we wrote together… All I can say is at the beginning of the film, I am at the car wash and it will go from there.”

As Ross pointed out, the “Buy Back the Block” video opened with he and Gucci at an independent car wash. It would seem their project borrows from that storyline in some form.

Two sites that advertise local talent casting posted casting call announcements in the Miami area for a Rick Ross project with the working title Mortgage. Both ClaimFame.com and Backstage.com announced casting calls for African-American men with large builds for paid, speaking lead roles. While filming for Mortgage was reportedly from July 8-10, it is unknown if the project was one of the two upcoming films Ross was referring to.

As for Gucci Mane, 2017 saw him release the independent short film The Spot. Prior to The Spot, Gucci appeared in Harmony Korine’s 2012 film Spring Breakers, which also starred Selena Gomez, James Franco, Ashley Benson and Vanessa Hudgens. Gucci Mane was credited as the character Archie.

More from Complex

Issa Rae Says Hollywood Will Be More Diverse as ‘Racist Old Executives’ Die

Writer, actress, and Insecure co-creator Issa Rae is Complex's new cover star, and in her in-depth interview with Nadeska Alexis she spoke at length about the issues of race in the entertainment industry.

When Rae was asked about a comment she made regarding Hollywood's diversity and progress being tied to racist, old executives dying off, the star didn’t mince words in her response. 

“I'm happy to report that we're making progress. People are dying,” she said in joke-y and serious manner. “Roger Ailes just died. He needed to go. it's great. As time goes on… unfortunately we won't be able to take advantage of it like the younger generation, but it's happening and I feel like there are people in positions of power who wouldn't have had an opportunity in the past that have opportunities now and who have, a firm vision and are intent on hiring the people who haven't been hired in the past. I'm very optimistic on that. People die every day, so it's great.”

Issa Rae's words may rub some the wrong way, but there's truth in what she's saying. Racial issues in the entertainment industry have been well-publicized these last few years, most notably with the #OscarsSoWhite controversy in the movie industry. Television, by comparison, has offered a more diverse crowd of nominees at the Emmys, but make no mistake: there’s still progress to be made—especially at all levels of the creative process, including the executive levels, where money is allocated and shows get greenlit or canceled.

In that respect, Rae highlights the importance of having individuals like Prentice Penny and Melina Matsoukas involved in the day-to-day creation of Insecure. While you wouldn’t describe them as TV veterans, their vision certainly helped shape the show. According to Rae, not everyone gets that opportunity in 2017.

“That's the biggest catch-22 of the situation of just trying to work in Hollywood, trying to hire younger writers, trying to hire people who aren't in the union and who aren't experienced,” she said. “They'll never get those opportunities if they don't get a chance, and some people get a chance and blow it. OK, but at least they got one.”

Watch our full video cover story with Issa Rae here. Season 2 of Insecure premieres on HBO this Sunday, July 23.

More from Complex

Tinashe Got Dragged for Claiming the Black Community Hasn’t Accepted Her (UPDATE)

UPDATE 12:43 p.m. ET: Tinashe has taken to Twitter to respond to people talking about her “colorism” comments. At the time of this writing, she hasn't released an official statement, but she has been replying to users, saying that the colorism comment was not “about colorism in the industry,” and that it is being “taken out of context.”

Original post is below.

Today, the world is waking up to Tinashe trending on Twitter and, sadly, it isn't because Joyride, the long-awaited follow-up to 2015's Aquarius, sprung a leak. It's over some surprising comments she made in an interview with The Guardian, which is doing no favors for her career.

Things started out fine enough. When asked about where her career is going, Tinashe kept it 100: “Things haven’t always gone according to my original plan, but that’s life, and things change.” As the interview progressed, the concept of being a woman in the music industry crept up, and Tinashe voiced her frustrations about the unfair boxes women are painted into. “There are hundreds of [male] rappers that all look the same, that sound the same, but if you’re a black woman, you’re either Beyoncé or Rihanna. It’s very, very strange.” After it was suggested that Ciara made a go of it, Tinashe agreed, saying “It felt like they almost had to sacrifice someone because there wasn’t enough room, which isn’t true. Ciara’s an amazing artist, Beyoncé’s an amazing artist, Rihanna’s an amazing artist, and they’re all very different!”

It was after this that Tinashe dropped the comment that's gotten her into hot water. Explaining that being mixed has been an issue for her in the industry, Tinashe said “There’s colorism involved in the black community, which is very apparent. It’s about trying to find a balance where I’m a mixed woman,” she continued, “and sometimes I feel like I don’t fully fit into the black community; they don’t fully accept me, even though I see myself as a black woman. That disconnect is confusing sometimes.”

And with that comment, Twitter was off to the races with comments about Tinashe as an artist, and why many feel her comments are off-base.

It's understandable that Tinashe would feel some kind of frustration about her career, but these comments were a misfire. The question is, will she be able to battle her way back into the public's good graces when Joyride finally drops?

More from Complex

Meet the 13-Year Old Selling Sneakers to Your Favorite Celebrities

He's just 13 years old, but Mitchell Sozio is already the plug for some of the biggest names in sports and entertainment.

We were first introduced to “Littysneaks” last month, when he was the subject of a profile by the Daily Front Row. Among the many interesting tidbits about this young entrepreneur is the fact that his nanny plays a role in shipping sneakers to customers. To get a first-hand account of Littysneaks experience, Rich “Maze” Lopez and Brendan Dunne invited the New York-based teen to be a guest on Full Size Run.

Detailing his path to becoming a renowned reseller, Littysneaks cites Kanye West as a personal influence when he was in the sixth grade. He started off just buying pairs for his personal collection before realizing there was money to be made by picking up extras.'

“I realized that I had all of these connections,” explained Sozio. “And I was like 'I can make all this money and instead getting one pair, I can just get eight pairs and flip it.”

While he won't reveal the names, Sozio says he has a clientele of A-list celebrities with social media followings in the multi-millions. He's made as much as $3,000 selling a single pair of sneakers.

Watch the full interview with Littysneaks above. If you'd like to listen on the go, check out the audio version below and subscribe to Full Size Run on iTunes.

More from Complex

Fyre Festival Head Admits They Were ‘A Little Naive’ In Statement

The Fyre Festival, a “luxury” music festival in the Bahamas, captured social media today after it was postponed. The reasons this festival fell apart were many: lack of organization, no security on the ground, canceled flights, mishandled luggage, “cabanas” that were actually disaster relief tents, terrible food, lockers without locks, and more. If it sounds like a lot, that’s because it was.

Amid the festival falling apart, the atmosphere was described as “total chaos” and “pandemonium.” For a full rundown of the festival’s demise, read this

Fyre Festival was scheduled to feature performances from some big-time artists: Desiigner, Blink-182, Lil Yachty, Pusha T, Rae Sremmurd, Tyga, and more. Ja Rule co-organized the festival, and Bella Hadid and Kendall Jenner are among the celebrities who promoted it.

Ja Rule said it’s not his fault, but he’s taking responsibility, which I’m pretty sure is literally the opposite of taking responsibility.

The festival’s head, 25-year-old Billy McFarland, has released a lengthy statement—via Rolling Stone—detailing how the festival fell apart and admitting that he and his team were “a little naive.” You can read the full statement below.

“Today is definitely the toughest day of my life. I'd love the opportunity to go through and tell my story of how we got here and how I see it now and where it's going.

I was a computer programmer, and after computers, the two things I love most are the ocean and, for some reason, rap music. So these three hobbies of mine somehow led me to meeting my partner, Ja Rule. Together, we became friends and business partners. For us, it was always a battle of pushing the limits. Once we got flying lessons together, we got on these really bad 40-year-old planes and flew from New York to the Bahamas—not really knowing the Bahamas very well—ran out of gas and landed in the Exumas and both of us immediately fell in love.

We started this website and launched this festival marketing campaign. Our festival became a real thing and took [on] a life of its own. Our next step was to book the talent and actually make the music festival. We went out excited, and that's when a lot of reality and roadblocks hit.

The Exumas didn't have a really great infrastructure—there wasn't a great way to get guests in here—we were a little bit ambitious. There wasn't water or sewage. It was almost like we tried building a city out of nothing and it took almost all of our personal resources to make this happen, and everything we had, to make this festival go on. We thought we were ready and built two different festival sites.

The morning of the festival, a bad storm came in and took down half of our tents and busted water pipes. Guests started to arrive and the most basic function we take for granted in the U.S., we realized, “Wow, we can't do this.” We were on a rush job to fix everything and guests were arriving and that caused check-in to be delayed. We were overwhelmed and just didn't have the foresight to solve all these problems.

We made sure all guests got a place to stay and had a really long conversation overnight last night after everyone was housed about what to do next and realized we couldn't risk the safety challenges. So that was the decision that we made—the first thing for us was making sure all these guests get refunded [and] all the vendors get taken care of. All the guests are going home, the refunds are being processed.

The weather unfortunately delayed flights and made them run into each other in terms of being close to when a lot of people were arriving. That was unfortunately something we had no control of, but it made things unacceptable for guests and we feel bad for it.

We thought we were making timeframes that were correct. We were a little naïve in thinking for the first time we could do this ourselves. Next year, we will definitely start earlier. The reality is, we weren't experienced enough to keep up.

Everybody who wants to go home is being sent home tonight. Some of the guests who are staying in private homes, we're asking them to stay longer, if they can. We're going to take every measure to make this right for everybody now, and make this right for everybody next year, on a large scale.

There will be make-up dates, May 2018 in the U.S., free for everybody who signed up for this festival. We will donate $1.50 [per ticket] to the Bahamian Red Cross. It'll keep the theme of being on water and beach. It'll be not just music, but all forms of entertainment. The one change we will make is we will not try to do it ourselves. We will make sure there is infrastructure in place to support us.”

Reading that, you have to feel at least a little bad for the guy. It’s clear he and his team got caught up in the excitement of their idea—which sounds good in theory, until you realize the Exumas were not set up at all for a festival—and got ahead of themselves.

Granted, a lot of people got screwed over by the Fyre Festival—that's nothing to overlook—but it sounds like the festival’s team is doing what they can to make it right.

More from Complex