President Trump Was Quietly Subpoenaed for 2007 Sexual Assault Allegation

Lost among the nuclear war tweets, paper towel throwing, and general disgrace that has been the Trump Administration was a seemingly unnoticed subpoena and a legal motion from Summer Zervos and her legal team as part of a larger lawsuit against Trump. 

Zervos was a former contestant on Trump’s reality show, The Apprentice. In October of 2016, Zervos accused Trump of kissing and groping her during a 2007 meeting at his bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel to discuss a potential employment opportunity. When Zervos’ accusations became public weeks before the 2016 election, Trump called the accusation a lie. Zervos subsequently sued Trump for defamation, and the aforementioned subpoena requests preservation all documents it had about Zervos and at least nine other women who have accused Trump of groping them. Trump has until October 31 to file a response to the motion.

A copy of the subpoena obtained by Buzzfeed requests the following:

“All documents concerning anyone connected to Summer Zervos, including without limitation her attorney, Gloria Allred, and/or any of Ms. Zervos’s relatives or friends. All documents concerning Jessica Leeds, Mindy McGillivray, Rachel Crooks, Natasha Stoynoff, Temple Taggart, Kristin Anderson, Cathy Heller, Jill Harth, Jessica Drake, or any woman alleging that Donald Trump touched her inappropriately. All documents concerning any of Donald J. Trump’s statements that Summer Zervos fabricated, created, or lied about her interactions with him, or was motivated to come forward by fame, money, politics, or pressure from the Clinton campaign, or his statement that he never met Ms. Zervos at a hotel or greeted her inappropriately.”

In 2005, Trump was recorded saying he regularly engages in such sexual assaults while talking with former Access Hollywood host Billy Bush about women aboard a bus on the set of Days of Our Lives.

For those on impeachment watch, it would take an act of “treason, bribery, and other high crimes and misdemeanors” for Trump to be removed from office. Both the House and Senate would need to find such an act to proceed with articles of impeachment.

No sitting President has been impeached for sexual assault. In 1998, the House of Representatives approved two articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton, under charges of lying under oath to a federal grand jury and obstruction of justice. Paula Jones and her attorneys sued Clinton for sexual harassment, however, the actual impeachment charges were related to Clinton’s grand jury testimony and not Jones’ accusations nor Clinton’s consensual affair with Monica Lewinsky. In February of 1999 Clinton was acquitted on both perjury charges. Clinton settled with Jones out of court.

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Vince Staples Addresses Eminem’s Trump Freestyle (UPDATE)

UPDATED 10/14/17 2:20 p.m. ET: Vince Staples wasn’t done. Hours after he explained his criticism of Eminem’s BET Hip Hop Awards freestyle, the Long Beach rapper returned to Twitter to answer more questions on the matter.

Staples reiterated that his problem wasn’t necessarily with Eminem; it was with the people who applauded the “trash” freestyle. He spoke about his respect for the Detroit rapper, but insisted his bars received more praise then they deserved. Staples said he believed this was a result of white privilege, which many Shady fans fail to acknowledge. 

Read the original story below.

Vince Staples is entitled to his own opinion. One in particular, where he weighs in on Eminem’s Trump freestyle at this year’s BET Hip Hop Awards, might have been taken out of context. At least, according to him.

Pitchfork ran a story this evening with the headline “Vince Staples Calls Eminem’s Trump Freestyle ‘Trash.” In the piece, Staples is quoted from his appearance at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art for the publication’s In Sight Out series. He says Em’s freestyle was “trash” and that “he can do better.”

He later explained if he were to rap those same lines, he wouldn’t of have the same impact. “If I said, ‘This is for Colin/Ball up a fist/And keep it balled up/Like Donald the bitch,’ they would be like, ‘Get this ni**a out of here.’”

Vince did share what he actually liked about the freestyle. “My favorite thing about the Eminem freestyle is the wall of dark-skinned black people behind him,” he said. “That was great.”

Shortly after the piece was published, Staples went on Twitter to clarify his words and said it was all in good fun.

In other Vince Staples news, he shared a new freestyle over YBN Nahmir's “Rubbin Off The Paint” on his Beats 1 radio show, which you can listen below.

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Joe Budden Fires Back at Chance the Rapper on ‘Everyday Struggle’

On today's Everyday Struggle, Joe Budden, DJ Akademiks, and Nadeska run through the day of rap news that includes YG asking for more credit in light of Eminem going at Donald Trump. The crew also break down Rick Ross' very direct shots at Birdman over the Lil Wayne situation and debate whether Rozay is overstepping his boundaries. Budden also responds to Chance the Rapper and shares some facts for the Chicago MC. 

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Eminem Destroys Trump in the 2017 BET Hip Hop Awards Cypher

Shady’s back. And he has more words for Donald Trump.

During this year's BET Hip Hop Awards, Eminem returned to the highly-anticipated cypher showcase, where he unleashed a 4-minute freestyle that took aim at POTUS. The NFL protests, hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico, and the border wall were just some of the topics Em touched on.

“But we better give Obama props, ’cause what we got in office now is a kamikaze that’ll probably cause a nuclear holocaust/And while the drama pops, and he waits for shit to quiet down/He’ll just gas his plane up and fly around until the bombing stops,” Eminem rapped. “Intensity’s heightened, tensions are rising/Trump, when it comes to giving a shit, you’re as stingy as I am/Except when it comes to having the balls to go against me, you hide ’em/’Cause you don't got the fuckin’ nuts, like an empty asylum.”

He also had a message for his fans who also supported Trump:

“Any fan of mine who’s a supporter of his, I’m drawing in the sand a line: You’re either for or against/And if you can’t decide who you like more and you’re split on who you should stand beside, I’ll do it for you with this: Fuck you.”

Additionally, Eminem put a fist in the air at one point and gave Colin Kaepernick a shout-out. Kaepernick acknowledged it by directing a tweet at Eminem a short time later.

You can watch the full freestyle above. 

The Detroit rapper participated in the annual freestyle battle back in 2009, with Mos Def and Black Thought. He returned in 2011 for the Shady 2.0 Cypher alongside Slaughterhouse, Yelawolf, Joe Budden, Crooked I, Royce Da 5’9”, and Joell Ortiz.

Eminem’s participation tonight has fueled rumors surrounding an upcoming project release. His long-awaited studio album has been teased since last year; however, speculation has surged within the last week after Shady Records producer Denaun Porter announced the album was officially completed. Though he later took back the statement, claiming he was simply trolling fans, HITS Daily Double reported Em’s next album will drop Nov. 17. Eminem’s camp has yet to confirm this.

Stay tuned. 

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Memo Reminds NBA Players Must Stand During National Anthem, Outlines Ways Players Can Effect Change

NBA Deputy Commissioner Mark Tatum sent out a memo to all 30 teams Friday instructing players and coaches to stand during the national anthem. Although there was no mention of punishment should players choose to kneel, he expressed that the league has a rule in place disallowing players from sitting or kneeling during the anthem. 

In the memo, obtained by Complex Sports, Tatum asked that teams use their season openers “to demonstrate your commitment to the NBA’s core values of equality, diversity, inclusion and serve as a unifying force in the community.” The memo continued: 

If you have not done so already, we suggest organizing discussions between players, coaches, general managers and ownership to hear the players’ perspectives.

One approach would be for team leadership to review existing team and league initiatives and encourage players to share their thoughts and ideas about them. Following those conversations, teams could develop plans prior to the start of the regular season for initiatives that players and senior leadership could participate in, such as:

  • Hosting Community Conversations with youth, parents, community leaders and law enforcement about the challenges we face and our shared responsibility to create positive change.
  • Creating “Building Bridges Through Basketball” programs that use the game of basketball to bring people together and deepen important bonds of trust and respect between young people, mentors, community leaders, law enforcement and other first responders.
  • Highlighting the importance of mentoring with the goal of adding 50,000 new mentors to support young people through our PSA campaign.
  • Engaging thought leaders and partners.  A variety of experts, speakers and partner organizations are available to players and teams as you continue these conversations and develop programming.
  • Establishing new and/or enhancing ongoing team initiatives and partnerships in the areas of criminal justice reform, economic empowerment and civic engagement.

Teams are urged to show videos prior to tip-off in their efforts to exemplify unity. It was also recommended that a player or coach address fans directly if a message is to be conveyed. 

Earlier this month, NFL players across the country took a knee during the anthem in protest of police brutality and in honor of Colin Kaepernick's decision to spearhead the gesture. This collective demonstration roused a response from the president, causing something of a sociopolitical tidal wave. NBA players Lebron James and Steph Curry both spoke out in support of NFL players’ decision to take a knee, and publicly criticized Donald Trump for claiming they should be fired for doing so. 

More likely than not, individual NBA players or entire teams are going to express their solidarity for the Black Lives Matter movement (something their counterparts in the WNBA have been at the forefront of), whether that be in the form of kneeling during the anthem or not. And it's not because they don't have respect for the NBA or the white men who run it. It's because they should have the right to take a stand against the bigotry and racism that continues to plague this country. 

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Cavaliers Owner Dan Gilbert Says He Received ‘Most Vile, Disgusting, Racist’ Voicemails After LeBron’s Trump Tweet

After LeBron James posted the tweet where he called Donald Trump a “bum” for withdrawing the Golden State Warriors' invitation to the White House, Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert says he received a ton of eye-opening racist voicemails directed at his star player. “The thing is, I mean, some of the most disgusting things I've ever heard people say,” Gilbert said on Friday's episode of CNBC's Squawk Box. “And you could hear it in their voice—the racism. It wasn't even really about the issue, and that's what really got me, because they went to who they really are, some of them.”

The voicemails opened Gilbert's eyes to the despicable racism that still exists today. “I received voicemails after LeBron tweeted that were some of the most vile, disgusting, racist [messages],” he said. “There's an element of racism that I didn't even realize existed in this country this much.” Gilbert admits to saving the voicemails, but has yet to tell LeBron about them—though he presumably knows now…

Earlier this week, Gilbert, whose company donated $750,000 towards Trump's inauguration and who allowed him to use the Cavaliers' Quicken Loans Arena for the 2016 Republican National Convention, released a statement addressing his relationship with the president of the United States. “Our interests are in the policies at the federal level, and not the politics surrounding the elections,” the statement read. “We have often supported both political parties in the same election so that we have the ability to impact positive change, regardless of who occupies the offices.” Gilbert and his wife did give a much smaller donation ($75,000) to Hillary Clinton's campaign. 

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You Buying This Explanation for Why Colin Kaepernick Wasn’t on That Controversial SI Cover?

Earlier this week, Sports Illustrated released one of the most controversial covers they’ve put out in a long time, even though they probably didn’t necessarily think that it would be all that controversial when they were planning it. As a reaction to all of the protests that took place last weekend after Donald Trump came out and criticized NFL players for taking a knee during the national anthem prior to games, SI put together a cover with the title, “A NATION DIVIDED, SPORTS UNITED.” It featured LeBron James, Steph Curry, Roger Goodell, Steve Kerr, Michael Bennett, and Candace Parker on it, among others.

As soon as the SI cover started circulating on social media, the first question most people had was: “WTF is Roger Goodell doing on it?” While Goodell did release a statement and—sort of—distance himself and the NFL from Trump’s anti-protest comments, he hasn’t exactly gone out of his way to support the players who have protested racial injustices and police brutality over the last year. And lest you forget, he’s kept quiet with regards to the petition that a handful of players sent him over the summer asking for the NFL to devote an entire month to social activism. So his inclusion on the SI cover was puzzling at best and downright disrespectful at worst in the eyes of many.

It also didn’t take very long for people to start asking another question once they got a glance at the cover: “Where is Colin Kaepernick?” Kaepernick is obviously the reason that this SI cover even exists in the first place. If he doesn’t take a knee during the national anthem before a preseason game last season, and if he doesn’t continue to take a knee during the national anthem before every regular-season game last year, and if he doesn’t influence other players to start taking a knee during the national anthem before games, and if he doesn’t get blackballed by the NFL in the offseason for igniting the entire #TakeAKnee movement, there is no reason for SI to do a “NATION DIVIDED, SPORTS UNITED” cover. So—where is Colin Kaepernick?

A lot of people asked this question:

Hell, even Curry, who was featured front and center on the SI cover, thought it was completely idiotic for SI to run a cover like this without giving a nod to the guy who is responsible for it existing. He went off on the cover on Wednesday and accused SI of trying to capitalize on the moment rather than actually doing something impactful for the culture.

“That was terrible,” he said. “Just kind of capitalizing on the hoopla and the media and all that nonsense. The real people that understand exactly what’s been going on and who’s really been active and vocal and truly making a difference, if you don’t have Kaepernick front and center on that, something’s wrong. It’s kind of hard to see how certain narratives take place, being prisoners of the moment.”

On Thursday, SI attempted to cover its ass by having Executive Editor Steve Cannella put together a video to explain the magazine’s original intention when they first conceived the cover. And it’s a great video—if you’re a fan of hearing someone use a bunch of buzz words that sound important. You can hear all about the “enduring message” of unity that SI was trying to get across with their cover below or here.

But what about the omission of Kaepernick? Again: Where was he? Cannella touched on that, too, and in doing so, he tried to sell everyone on the idea that Kaepernick was on the cover, even if he wasn’t actually there in the physical form.

“In some ways, even though his picture is not there, Colin Kaepernick is there; I think we all know that,” he said. “Colin Kaepernick—for lack of a better word—was looming over everything that happened this past weekend, and looms over many of the issues in society right now.”

Cannella continued by saying that SI’s intention wasn’t to ignore Kaepernick (for the record, he was mentioned at length in the accompanying cover story). Rather, the magazine wanted to shine light on some of the other professional athletes who stepped up in his absence last weekend—since, again, he has essentially been blackballed by the NFL—and continued to carry out his message.

“I thought what we were trying to capture with this cover was the way new voices emerged this weekend,” he said.

And later, he once again tried to push the idea that Kaepernick was a part of the cover even though, well, he wasn’t.

Colin Kaepernick is on that cover,” Cannella said. “Even if his face and his name aren’t there, we all know who stands behind this movement. We all know who got it started. Colin Kaepernick has many more brothers than he did a week ago.”

The problem with all of this is that by not including Kaepernick on the cover, SI—and those who are in favor of the message SI presented with its cover—are taking the focus away from what Kaepernick was protesting last season and instead turning it into a completely different issue. The “united” approach that SI took when it put its cover together is now leading to protests that really aren’t protests at all.

Kaepernick made it very clear why he was protesting shortly after his first protest went public.

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses Black people and people of color,” he said. “To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder…I have to stand up for people that are oppressed.”

So by pushing Kaepernick out of the spotlight—or in this case, off of the SI cover—you’re also pushing the message that he fought so hard to get out there last season out of the spotlight, too. And you’re replacing it with a different message that is overshadowing the one that should be front and center right now. Just like Kaepernick should be front and center on that SI cover.

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