Suge Knight Claims Dr. Dre Put a Hit on Him for $20K

According to newly released legal documents, Suge Knight says that he was shown a check for $20,000 that Dr. Dre allegedly wrote to a man named Dwayne Johnson (not that Dwayne Johnson) to have Knight killed. According to TMZ, Suge claims that this purported hit was supposed to go down on the same day (January 29, 2015) that he ran over and killed a man in a Tam's Burgers parking lot, which has led to his current murder trial.

The ex-CEO of Death Row said in legal documents that during a jailhouse visit in July of 2016, both he and a private investigator had Johnson tell them that a check for $20k was given to him as partial payment to kill Knight. Johnson was at the aforementioned parking lot on the date of Knight's hit-and-run that led to his current incarceration.

As TMZ notes about this most recent accusation:

“The upshot of what Suge is arguing … he had reason to fear for his life when he entered Tam's.”

Still, according to the LA Times, Suge says he never got a copy of the check and the PI he mentions “now claims it does not exist.

Knight, of course, is no stranger to throwing out accusations, which has even included a past claim that Dr. Dre hired a hitman to have him killed at the 2014 VMAs pre-party hosted by Chris Brown. At that pre-party, he was shot six times.

Not surprisingly, an attorney for Dr. Dre called these latest claims both “absurd” and “defamatory.”

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Prodigy Beefed With All Your Favorite Rappers, and Always Held His Own

Albert “Prodigy” Johnson, whose death from complications from sickle cell anemia was confirmed Tuesday afternoon, was a true rap legend. As a part of the duo Mobb Deep with Kejuan “Havoc” Muchita, and on his own (especially when partnering with producer Daniel “The Alchemist” Maman), P made classic music that will stand the test of time.

But almost as much as writing great rhymes, Prodigy loved a good rap beef. His career was filled with battles against many of the greatest rappers of all time, and he usually gave as good as he got.

Here is a by-no-means-definitive list of some of P's greatest rap beefs.

Tha Dogg Pound and 2Pac

In his 2011 memoir My Infamous Life, Prodigy traces his beef with nearly the entire West Coast to one video. He says that the clip for Tha Dogg Pound's collaboration with Snoop Dogg, “New York, New York,” which featured the rappers blown up to Godzilla size, walking through NYC wreaking havoc, was something he took personally.

So Mobb Deep teamed up with Capone-N-Noreaga and made “L.A., L.A.” in retaliation. As the East-West rivalry began to heat up, 2Pac, newly signed to Death Row, decided to get involved. 'Pac went at nearly everybody—Big, Nas, Jay Z, and Mobb Deep, plus a few more people for good measure—on “Hit 'Em Up.”

“Don't one of you niggas got sickle cell or something?” Pac teased on the track. “You fuck around with me, you about to have a seizure or a heart attack.”

P struck back immediately. In his book, he says that the very same day he first heard “Hit 'Em Up,” he went to the studio and recorded the vicious “Drop a Gem on 'Em.”

Sadly, just a few weeks later, 'Pac was killed.

Keith Murray and Def Squad

On the now-famous (and oft-parodied) monologue “The Infamous Prelude,” Prodigy took shots at (nameless) rappers who talk about “how much weed you smoke” and “space shit.”

One rapper who did just that, Keith Murray of Def Squad, felt some type of way. Eventually, they squashed the beef at a video shoot. That is, until Prodigy ignited it again by rhyming about “def kids feeling guilty 'bout the space shit” on LL Cool J's “I Shot Ya”—a record on which Murray appeared as well. 

At that point, Murray got into a fight with P outside NYC nightclub the Tunnel (“Keith Murray and his whole clique/Yeah, you snuffed me in front of the cops, that's bullshit,” Prodigy recalled on “In the Long Run”). The two would continue trading disses back and forth for years.

Jay Z

The “New York, New York” video actually started a second major beef in Prodigy's career. Jay made a passing reference to the clip on his 1998 song “Money, Cash, Hoes”: “It's like New York's been soft ever since Snoop came through and crushed the building.”

It was a line Prodigy took public exception to. “Jay was nowhere to be found when that drama popped off between Mobb Deep, Dogg Pound, Pac, and Biggie,” P told The Source. “That was our little personal beef, not a coastal war… so Jay Z is a bitch-ass nigga for making that quote in his lyrics.”

Tensions that had been stewing for years (there were, P claimed, subliminals thrown back and forth on “Trife Life” and “Where I'm From”) exploded in 2001 when Hov debuted his Mobb Deep diss “Takeover” live at Summer Jam, and included the now-infamous picture of a young Prodigy at his grandmother's dance school. 

“I did like the tactic that Jay used,” Prodigy said years later, about the photo displayed on the Summer Jam screen. “That was pretty slick.” He fired back with “Crawlin'”—and, at least according to his memoir, by nearly beating Jay up at Diddy's restaurant, Justin's

Nas

On “Destroy and Rebuild,” released in 2001, Nas took some shots at P, but in a very Nas-like way: “Prodigy, I got love for you,” he says on the song's outro. “Just get them unloyal niggas from out your circle.” Prodigy claimed in his book that Nas rapped this because “he was mad at me for doing a song with Cormega on which Mega took shots at Nas in his verse.”

But there was actually another, deeper level. P said in an interview on Vlad TV that some of Nas' Queensbridge friends were upset that Prodigy was repping their hood even though he wasn't originally from there. 

“I can't even really be mad at Nas, because these is the people he grew up with,” P said. “I had to distance myself from them, because [Nas is] standing next to someone who's threatening my life… that's how it got kind of crazy.” Nas and P reconciled when Prodigy returned home from prison in 2011.

Saigon and Tru Life

To hear Saigon tell it, the origin of this beef comes from Prodigy double-dipping. 

“Prodigy stole $15,000 from Tru Life. Not stole it, but he did a verse for him, and went and did the same verse and took the money, and then went and did the same verse on some other shit,” Sai told This Is 50. “Tru was like, 'Aight, give me another verse.' Son kept ducking.”

Tru Life and Mobb had serious issues from then on, which were documented in the film Beef. Tru claims he and his crew ran into a Mobb studio session with guns and beat some people up.

Because Tru Life and Saigon were close, Sai got dragged in as things escalated. Not helping matters was an interview where P said he didn't like Saigon—something Saigon saw and promised retaliation. It all culminated in a fight between Mobb Deep and Sai at SOBs in the fall of 2007. The two would continue to snipe at each other well into 2011.

As for Tru, he and Prodigy would finally reconcile in 2016.

Crooked I

While incarcerated, P was still keeping up to date on what was going on in hip-hop. Vibe conducted a poll about the best rapper alive in 2008, and Prodigy was not happy with the results. “Vibe says 920,000 people voted for it,” he wrote in a letter. “I would personally bitch slap all 920,000 of these voters if given the opportunity. Who in the fuck picked Crooked I, Flo Rida, and Rich Boy? How did Vibe approve this?”

Crooked responded by challenging Prodigy to a fight.

Havoc

P's propensity for feuds even extended to his own Mobb Deep collaborator, Havoc. In the spring of 2012, Havoc sent out a bunch of strange tweets attacking his partner in rhyme. He went as far as accusing P of having a homosexual relationship while locked up. “”I got n***as in the jail system to back up that prodigy was fucking homes in jail,” he wrote. 

Havoc then released a statement saying his phone was stolen. But that was proven to be a lie when audio of Havoc going at P was leaked to the Breakfast Club. The group went on temporary hiatus, but reunited the following year.

But today, to mark his passing, it's been all love from the rap world. Prodigy is a legend and he will be missed. 

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Troy Ave Claims He Was Going to Sign With TDE Despite Calling Kendrick a ‘Weirdo Rapper’

On his just-released NuPac project, Troy Ave claims he was ready to sign with Top Dawg Entertainment before “the whole shit just fell through.” On the 32-minute commentary track “Truth Be Told PSA,” Troy Ave opens up about his efforts to keep his career moving forward while in jail. During that time, Ave says, Kendrick Lamar indirectly reached out with some words of support.

According to Ave, Lamar said something to the effect of, “I see what you're going through, man. Send my love.” A couple days after receiving Lamar's words, Ave started pondering a future with Top Dawg Entertainment and gave then-manager Hovain a call. “I said, 'Yo, put the plan in action, man,” Ave recalled. “We gonna go out West when I come home and we gonna sign with TD.'” The story falls in line with the theme of Troy Ave comparing his career to 2Pac on NuPac, as 2Pac signed to Death Row after Suge Knight's assistance in posting bail in 1995.

Ave added that he always admired the Top Dawg brand. “I always liked what they was doing,” Ave said. “They kinda independent like us, but way bigger because they went and got with a major. They got shit that I like to see, like loyalty and unity, that type of shit. Cool. I give [Hovain] the whole play. Of course, he can't make that happen at all. At all. He doesn't make it happen. The whole shit just fell through.”

The TDE comments start at roughly the 14:45 mark in the clip below:

Interestingly enough, Ave once said Lamar was “just a weirdo rapper” in the Raekwon and N.O.R.E. collab “New York City.”

Ave later told Hot 97 the lyric wasn't intended as a diss. 

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Suge Knight Claims He Knows Who Killed 2Pac and Insists They Were Really After Him

Back in September of 1996, Suge Knight was driving the BMW that got riddled with the bullets that killed 2Pac. While it was always thought that 2Pac was the intended target (due to a scuffle that went down at the Tyson fight Suge and 'Pac were attending), Knight is now saying he was the one they were shooting at.

This new information comes from a signed affidavit that Knight's attorney Thaddeus Culpepper released. Knight says that it was his ex-wife Sharitha and former Death Row security chief Reggie Wright, Jr. who were behind the hit, and it was Knight, not 'Pac, who they were gunning for. This information is reportedly in the new documentary Tupac Assassination: Battle for Compton, and Knight says everything they presented in this doc is true.

A spokesperson for the film reportedly told Music News that “Culpepper told Carlin individually that not only did Knight confirm the events as portrayed in Compton, which portray Knight was the intended target and Shakur as collateral damage, as true, but also goes on to allege that these 1996 events may have been the first in a history of attempts on Knight's life, culminating in the recent attempted killing of Knight at the 1OAK Club in Los Angeles, where Knight was shot six times.”

Interestingly enough, Knight was adamant that he wouldn't tell the police who killed 'Pac if he knew who it was just two months after 'Pac died. On national television, no less.

Reggie Wright Jr. told AllHipHop in 2015 that multiple people have tried to connect him with 2Pac's death, and that “all these people are dropping dead. I keep telling people God don’t like ugly. I hope people learn a lesson from this.” That's eerie as f*ck, and can be taken a couple of different ways. Either way, there's currently no word on if authorities will be pursuing more with Wright.

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