Thirsty Investors Are Taking Out Mortgages on Their Homes to Cop Bitcoin

Being an adult of a certain age, I'm OK with sharing this fact with you: I don't understand the first thing about bitcoin. I mean, I've heard about cryptocoin mining and have had people tell me to invest in it, but how does one do any of that? I couldn't tell you. Hell, even though bitcoin is said to (somehow) be more valuable than McDonalds and Disney, I didn't even realize there were physical bitcoins until I found the above photo for this very post.

Anyways, like I said, heads have been talking about investing in bitcoin HEAVY over the last week or so. Apparently, it's gone up as high as $19,000 per unit at one point (jumping more than 1,000 percent since the beginning of 2017), and is currently hovering around the $16,000 mark. This has people going nuts trying to invest as much as they can, even to the point of taking out mortgages on their homes to invest in Bitcoin. Why? Because people will do anything when something as sought-after as bitcoin is in its “mania” phase.

Despite reports that bitcoin is indeed a bubble, that doesn't seem to stop people. CNBC is reporting that Wall Street isn't even convinced that bitcoin is actual currency, which is concerning. It's wild, especially considering that a show like Mr. Robot, which aims to showcase what would happen during an actual economic crisis, is highlighting how important a bitcoin-esque line of currency would be in those kinds of financial downfalls.

What does any of this mean, in layman's terms? Essentially, invest in bitcoin at your own risk. While the future could change, currently, it's in a frenzied state, and may not even pan out in terms of actual dollars. That said, if you're not ready to put in the work on the pros and cons of playing with that kind of fire, don't do insane shit like putting a mortgage on your house to potentially fuck your livelihood up.

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Apple Reportedly Plotting to Drop 3 New iPhones in 2018

Now that we all have our iPhone X and iPhone 8 devices either currently in our hands or en route to our homes, we are at peace with the crumbling world around us. You could even say we are content and have no interest in entertaining the usual premature hype given to whatever next year's phones may bring, as we have learned the power of simply appreciating what we have.

Obvious lies and idealistic bullshit aside, let's get real. The chatter about Apple's 2018 plans has indeed already kicked off and you know damn well any self-respecting publication will publish every single rumor, even when the rumors contradict each other and offer zero clarity. In that spirit, strap in for the rumored allegedness surrounding whisperings of Apple having a trio of new iPhones on deck for next year.

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As spotted by CNBC Monday, a note from KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo (by way of MacRumors) suggests Apple is planning to drop a “high-end” device with a massive 6.5-inch display. Apple is also reportedly (allegedly, possibly, maybe, etc.) dropping a 5.8-incher and a 6.1-incher. The 6.5 and 5.8-inch devices, MacRumors said, will boast OLED displays, while the 6.1-incher will have LCD. Presumably, the rumored device with a 6.5-inch display is the iPhone X Plus.

All three devices will reportedly arrive with full-screen notched design and the X's TrueDepth camera capabilities. The source of these whisperings, Ming-Chi Kuo, is touted by MacRumors as someone who “doesn't have an absolutely perfect track record, [but] often relays accurate information from his sources within Apple's supply chain.” Fair enough.

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Kobe Bryant Has Words for Big Baller Brand

Besides Michael Jordan, few athletes have been able to match the footwear output and quality that Kobe Bryant was able to achieve during his NBA career. From Adidas to Nike, it's safe to say that he's the second best basketball player in signature shoe history (there, I said it). This past week, Bryant had choice words for another Los Angeles Laker looking to break into the signature shoe game, Lonzo Ball.

During an interview with CNBC, Bryant said about Ball's Big Baller Brand, “It's not good enough to have a shoe and launch a shoe. In that market, in that business, you have to make sure the product is there. That's the only way you can challenge the big guys, is if the innovation and the quality of the product is there.”

It's funny because Lonzo's ZO2 sneakers with BBB are a clear rip off of Bryant's signature sneakers with Nike. With this happening, the guys at Full Size Run (myself included) decided to break down what Kobe's words mean.

Watch the episode above.

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Cavaliers Owner Dan Gilbert Says He Received ‘Most Vile, Disgusting, Racist’ Voicemails After LeBron’s Trump Tweet

After LeBron James posted the tweet where he called Donald Trump a “bum” for withdrawing the Golden State Warriors' invitation to the White House, Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert says he received a ton of eye-opening racist voicemails directed at his star player. “The thing is, I mean, some of the most disgusting things I've ever heard people say,” Gilbert said on Friday's episode of CNBC's Squawk Box. “And you could hear it in their voice—the racism. It wasn't even really about the issue, and that's what really got me, because they went to who they really are, some of them.”

The voicemails opened Gilbert's eyes to the despicable racism that still exists today. “I received voicemails after LeBron tweeted that were some of the most vile, disgusting, racist [messages],” he said. “There's an element of racism that I didn't even realize existed in this country this much.” Gilbert admits to saving the voicemails, but has yet to tell LeBron about them—though he presumably knows now…

Earlier this week, Gilbert, whose company donated $750,000 towards Trump's inauguration and who allowed him to use the Cavaliers' Quicken Loans Arena for the 2016 Republican National Convention, released a statement addressing his relationship with the president of the United States. “Our interests are in the policies at the federal level, and not the politics surrounding the elections,” the statement read. “We have often supported both political parties in the same election so that we have the ability to impact positive change, regardless of who occupies the offices.” Gilbert and his wife did give a much smaller donation ($75,000) to Hillary Clinton's campaign. 

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Uber Hit With Criminal Probe by U.S. Department of Justice

The not-so-great press continues for Uber, this time with the launch of a criminal probe. The U.S. Department of Justice kicked off one such probe into Uber Technologies Inc. this week, CNBC reported. The investigation centers on Uber's use of a software tool known as “Greyball,” which helped the popular ride-on-demand service identify and ultimately avoid government officials in areas where the service hadn't been approved for use.

Greyball's use was limited following publication of a New York Times story about its controversial capabilities earlier this year. In March, in a piece by Mike Isaac entitled “How Uber Deceives the Authorities Worldwide,” the Times described a program involving Greyball in which evasion methods were employed in cities including Paris, Las Vegas, Boston, and Portland. In now-public letters to Portland officials from Uber attorneys, the company asserted that Greyball had been used “exceedingly sparingly” in Portland prior to the service's eventual approval in 2015.

Also revealed in the Times piece was the potential legality issues surrounding Greyball. The tool, Wayne State University law professor Peter Henning said at the time, could potentially be considered a federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act violation, or possibly worse: an intentional obstruction of justice. “We all take our foot off the gas when we see the police car at the intersection up ahead, and there's nothing wrong with that,” Henning explained. “But this goes far beyond avoiding a speed trap.”

In a separate Times report in April, Uber was alleged to have secretly identified and tagged iPhones even after the app had been removed from the device. The “fraud detection maneuver” was a violation of Apple's privacy rules, prompting Apple CEO Tim Cook to call a meeting with Uber boss Travis Kalanick in 2015. Cook demanded Kalanick put an end to the methods, or risk being banned form the App Store altogether. Kalanick honored Cook's request.

Uber did not immediately respond to Complex's request for comment.

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