‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Posted a Historic Second-Weekend Box Office Total

Avengers: Infinity War casually crossed the $1 billion mark in worldwide box office sales over the weekend, and its dominance was further bolstered by one of the biggest second-weekend openings of all time.

“Disney and Marvel’s latest collaboration earned $112.5 million from 4,474 locations in its second frame,” reported Rebecca Rubin of Variety. “The 56% decline was just enough to top the record previously held by fellow Marvel title Black Panther, which made $111.6 million in its second weekend. Star Wars: The Force Awakens holds the prize for biggest second weekend, with a mighty $149 million in 2015.”

Even with that drop in mind, it's worth noting that the film hasn’t even opened in China, where it potentially stands to earn even more.

For further context, Infinity War is only the fifth film to rake in $100 million during its second weekend. Per USA Today, Black Panther ($108 million), Star Wars: The Force Awakens ($149.2 million), Jurassic World ($106.6 million) and The Avengers ($103.1 million) are the other movies to pull off the feat.

As expected, rolling out a star-studded addition to the MCU has been great for Disney’s bottom line. Business Insider reports that Disney shares increased by 2 percent last week as Infinity War broke box office records.

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KFC and Taco Bell Will Start Offering Home Deliveries Across the Country

In news that doesn’t suck: KFC and Taco Bell’s home delivery service will soon be available nationwide.

According to Business Insider, the chain’s parent company Yum Brands has inked a $200 million deal with Grubhub, which will serve as its official delivery partner for thousands of KFC and Taco Bell locations across the country. As of now, the chains are only offering delivery in select cities, including Indianapolis; Louisville, Kentucky; and Omaha, Nebraska.

Yum Brands announced the partnership Thursday in a press release, explaining how the new deal is expected to increase sales “through online ordering for pickup and delivery.”

“We are committed to making our iconic brands easier to access through online ordering for pickup and delivery, and aggressively pursuing delivery as a strategic global growth opportunity, with nearly half of our 45,000 restaurants already offering it today,” Yum Brands CEO Greg Creed said in the press release. “We’re pleased to secure this partnership with Grubhub in order to drive incremental, profitable growth for our U.S. franchisees over the long term. Our partnership and strategic investment in Grubhub demonstrate our laser-like focus on two of our growth drivers: Distinctive, Relevant & Easy Brands and Unmatched Franchise Operating Capability.”

TL;DR: You won't have to leave your house to get that bucket of chicken or Double Stacked Taco you’ll inevitably crave.

See, dreams really do come true. 

Business Insider reports the chains will begin rolling out the nationwide delivery service in the upcoming months. Stay tuned as more information becomes available. 

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What You Need to Know About the 25-Year-Old Douche Bro Behind Fyre Festival

For the last four or five days, your Twitter timeline has no doubt been inundated with the nightmare situation known as Fyre Festival, which went from being a $12,000-a-pop music festival for the rich, white elite to what looked like a disaster recovery situation (with actual disaster relief tents). In the fallout, it's been announced that Ja Rule and the squad behind the Fyre Festival is being hit with a $100 million class action lawsuit for their gross fuck up.

While it's been easy to chuck “Ja Rule The Scammer” tweets out there, it might be time to look at one of the other “names” on the Fyre Festival lawsuit; Billy McFarland. At 25, dude's already had his name affixed to a number of companies, primarily with an emphasis on millennials who want the finer things in life. He's one of those entrepreneurial guys who always seems to have a plan, and can apparently talk his way into a pile of money without truly delivering on his promises. A.k.a. the American way. Here's a look at Billy McFarland's pre-Fyre highlights.

McFarland's always been a businessman

When you were 13, you probably were trying to bag shorty in your math class; yung McFarland was already building his first startup, which apparently outsourced design work. A few years later, he was already dropping out of Bucknell University to found Spling, which at the time was another addition to the social networking space that secured $400,000 in funding back in 2011.

Neither of these startups caused as much havoc as his 2014 startup Magnises, which found McFarland creating his own black card (which after turned into an app, Magnises NOW) for millennials who were trying to get their IRL social status game up. It sounds dope, but apparently, you had to promise to spend $250,000 a year through the card (with a $250 annual fee) to get the Magnises perks like 24/7 concierge service, special treatment and discounts from elite brands and restaurants, and invites to exclusive events.

At the time, McFarland told Bloomberg that Magnises “enhances and really improves your everyday life in the city,” but in January of 2017, Business Insider reported that cardholders felt scammed, saying that the perks that Magnises promised (which included everything from Hamilton tickets to SR-22 plane rides to the Hamptons) were not being met. At the time, McFarland said Magnises “hit some roadblocks along the way, and that's what happens when you grow really quickly, and that's on me.” But McFarland's troubles weren't focused solely on Magnises' troubles.

McFarland trashed his $13,000-a-month West Village home

It's a given that when most young guys secure a bag, they might go ham with their earnings. According to the New York Post, in 2013 McFarland had a 500-person birthday party for photographer/socialite Patrick McMullan at his $13,750-a-month duplex on Greenwich Ave. This was one of many “blowout parties” that the landlord said caused roughly $62,000 worth of damage to the spot. At the time, the owner was looking for McFarland to pony up $100,000 in damages, but McFarland said the charges were “not valid.”

WTF is Fyre Media?

That's hard to say; according to LinkedIn, Fyre Media, Inc. was founded in 2015 is “an on demand service that makes booking the most influential celebrities, artists, athletes, models, and entertainers seamless and transparent.” They have an app, and it looks like some of their “exclusive” artists feature Fat Joe, Waka Flocka, Soulja Boy, Jim Jones, and Ja Rule. Rule, who has been listed as a co-founder of Fyre, is reportedly the “mastermind” behind the Fyre Festival, which McFarland was touting as a “luxury music festival” that was due to span two weekends (April 28-30, 2017 and May 5-7, 2017) in the Bahamas.

Aside from the musical acts, which were to include everyone from G.O.O.D. Music and Blink-182 to Disclosure and Lil Yachty, Fyre Festival was reportedly set to have $1 million worth of “hidden treasures” that would be found all over the island. It was also set to feature all kinds of rich, elite millennials attending, paying upwards of $12,000-a-pop to experience the music, art installations, talks, amazing food, and much more while chilling on the sands of Fyre Cay in the Bahamas.

As we now know, what the people got when they hit the island was the exact opposite of a “luxury music festival” experience, a day which McFarland told Rolling Stone was “definitely the toughest day” of his short, intriguing, possibly scam-filled life. It doesn't help that the festival appeared to be doomed from the start, with everything from “a rampant shark problem” and sandflies to the fucking FEMA tents and not having a stage(?!) setup revealed that Fyre was the dumpster fire it turned out to be from the rip.

McFarland also told Rolling Stone that “there will be make-up dates, May 2018 in the U.S., free for everybody who signed up for this festival,” although at this point, with his cache (and the social media shitstorm that followed the Fyre Festival) and that $100 million lawsuit looming over his head, what masochist would want to subject themselves to Fyre Festival, The Sequel?

Maybe McFarland needs to do what he does best: find new ways to rope money-hungry millennials into giving him more of their cheddar.

 

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Here’s What Snapchat’s CEO Loves To Listen To

It’s fairly well-known that Evan Spiegel, the CEO of Snap Inc., values his privacy incredibly highly. He doesn’t have a public Facebook account, nor does he regularly tweet, like the majority of top execs at tech companies. He does, however, regularly share his current music tastes on Hype Machine.

“Share” might be a bit of a strong word, considering the site just aggregates and keeps track of his listening habits on a public profile. But for how private he is everywhere else, he might as well be announcing, “Hey! Look at this!”

Spiegel is a huge fan of dance and pop; he just played the Slander & B-Sides remix of “Let Me Love You” by DJ Snake & Justin Bieber in the last hour, and it’s his 11th time listening to it, no less.

He’s also been listening to “Love Is Alive” by Louis the Child and Elohim, as well as “Phones Down” by Lost Kings, “White Lies” by Odesza, and “Let You Get Away” by Shaun Frank feat Ashe.

His current ‘obsession’ is “Yea, Babe, No Way” by LANY, which he’s played an astounding 48 times.

You can peruse Spiegel’s full listening history on his Hype Machine account.

 

via Business Insider

This article was first published on Your EDM.
Source: Here’s What Snapchat’s CEO Loves To Listen To

New York City Nightclubs Ban Photos and Videos

Listen here: New York City Nightclubs Ban Photos and Videos

An article in The New York Times’ Style section recently came out stating that New York City clubs are now enforcing a strict no-photo policy. Clubs such as Le Baron, No. 8, Output and recently opened Sankeys will be enforcing this new rule by banning photos and videos in an effort to refocus the attention on the music instead of your Instagram pictures.

Business Insider wrote “The purported rationale behind the no-photo policy is that without smartphones constantly in-hand, A-list clientele will feel more comfortable, people will be more willing to let their guard down, and the party will feel more exclusive.”

Many are complaining about the new photo-ban, but after seeing Deadmau5′s crowd on New Years Eve, what’s your thoughts on this new photo ban?